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Running into Trouble

Dec. 12, 2011
Dec. 12, 2011

Table of Contents
Dec. 12, 2011

LEADING OFF
GOLF PLUS
  • How big was Tiger's victory at the Chevron? Can Luke Donald hang on to No. 1? Who's most likely to become the top American? How do the major venues rate, and who will win the four championships?

  • Great majors, a new No. 1, LPGA dominance, an old school fight for the money title and the rediscovery of a vintage track too tough to die made 2011 a terrific year in golf

  • The game will long remember Europe's leading light, a pioneering woman and a television innovator

Inside: THE WEEK IN SPORTS
SPORTSMAN OF THE YEAR / SPORTSWOMAN OF THE YEAR
SPORTSMAN OF THE YEAR, 1981
SPORTSWOMAN OF THE YEAR, 1976
  • A couple of recent divorces have dusted up the Girl Next Door, but as always she will never sit back and accept defeat

SPORTSMAN OF THE YEAR, 1982
  • A man can gather plenty of insight on the road from boy wonder to senior statesman for the sport he loves

PRO FOOTBALL
  • The Patriots' defense, built from spare parts, castoffs and converted receivers, ranks dead last in the NFL, and yet New England is once again cruising to the playoffs. The real test is yet to come

SPECIAL REPORT
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL
BASEBALL
  • In 136 major league seasons, there's never been a more dizzyingly dramatic day than Sept. 28, 2011. The Red Sox and the Braves may disagree, but for everyone else it's a date that will live in ecstasy

PRO HOCKEY
  • With the club slumping and captain Alex Ovechkin seemingly checked out, the Capitals dumped their coach. Now one of the NHL's superstars isn't just struggling to rediscover his game, but he's also trying to shed an ugly label

  • The NHL's coaching carousel began to go 'round in earnest last week, with three jobs turning over in a four-day stretch. Besides the departure of Bruce Boudreau and the arrival of Dale Hunter in Washington, D.C., here's the lowdown on what went wrong and what to expect from here on in

COLLEGE BASKETBALL
WALTER IOOSS JR.
Departments

Running into Trouble

The family of track legend Sydney Maree is protesting his imprisonment in South Africa

Three decades ago South African expatriate Sydney Maree became a voice for the inequities of his homeland's apartheid system, an elite miler without a country. Today his family is giving voice to Maree's struggle for freedom in the country it says has wrongly imprisoned him and thwarted his family's attempts to make contact.

This is an article from the Dec. 12, 2011 issue

Maree was an All-America at Villanova and set a world record for the 1,500 meters in 1983. He then became a U.S. citizen and competed at the '88 Olympics while South Africa was banned from the Games because of its separatist policies. Maree returned to South Africa in 1995 with his wife and five children and later took over as CEO of National Empowerment Fund, a government-owned corporation that provides small business loans to black-run companies. In 2004, Maree was charged with fraud. He pleaded not guilty but was convicted in '06. Maree claims his troubles began when he questioned a government superior who had instructed him to offer an NEF contract to Deutsche Bank without conducting a proper tendering process. The government official, Maree says, decided to invalidate the agreement but instructed him to transfer NEF funds into Maree's personal account, to be paid to Deutche Bank to avoid legal action.

Maree, 55, was convicted two years later but didn't begin serving his sentence until last June. According to Maree's son Daniel, 24, authorities would not release his whereabouts to his family, which had been unable to locate him for months. "The legal system is still rife with delays and corruption," says Daniel. Maree's 10-year sentence was commuted to five because he had been under virtual house arrest while his case dragged on. "Perhaps he can be a source of change again," says Daniel. "This isn't about Sydney Maree. It's about due process."

PHOTOIMAGO/ZUMAPRESS.COM (MAREE)HAPPIER TIME Maree, enjoying his 1,500-meter world record, qualified for the 1984 and '88 Olympics as a United States citizen.