THE 1-2 PUNCH

ECHOES OF '98 ABOUND AS THE FOOTBALL WORLD WEIGHS THE MERITS OF THE QUARTERBACK PAIR CERTAIN TO BE TAKEN AT THE TOP ON APRIL 26. Like PEYTON MANNING AND RYAN LEAF 14 YEARS AGO, ANDREW LUCK AND ROBERT GRIFFIN III WILL BE FOREVER LINKED AS COSTARS IN A DRAFT THAT WILL SHAPE THE FATES OF TWO FRANCHISES
April 23, 2012

In 1998, the story of the NFL draft was the prospecting being done at the top. The Colts, in need of a quarterback, had the first pick, and there were two promising candidates. Peyton Manning or Ryan Leaf? Bill Polian, newly named general manager in Indianapolis, had a devil of a decision to make—or so it seemed. In reality Polian knew he wanted Manning 16 days before the draft, and spent the rest of the lead-up time double- and triple-checking his pick.

"At the scouting combine in 1998," Polian says, "Leaf missed his appointment with us, though there was some dispute about the reason. Manning used his appointment to interview us. He had a yellow legal pad with all these questions—what was our offensive philosophy, how would we build the team. Talk about a harbinger of things to come. Then we had their workouts, Manning at Tennessee and Leaf at Washington State, on back-to-back days. There were all these tales out there at the time. Manning had zero ceiling, average arm, bad athlete. Leaf had the high ceiling, rocket arm, better athlete. We saw that the opposite was true. Actually, we were shocked at Leaf's workout. He wasn't in really good shape. He was heavy. Much less lively arm than Peyton. And when we talked with them, we just felt there was a huge difference in the maturity of the two guys. Peyton was much more ready to handle the burdens of being a rookie starter in the NFL. So before the draft, I told [owner] Jim Irsay, in sort of a jocular way: 'If we miss on Leaf, that'll be a gigantic miss. If we miss on Manning, we'll have [the next] Bernie Kosar, which isn't so bad.'"

Polian, of course, took Manning, his first-ever pick for the team. And he didn't miss. Fourteen years later, with Indy in a similar situation, he was preparing to draft Manning's heir—but never got the chance. Throughout the fall of 2011, Polian, then the Colts' president, worked with his son Chris, the team's G.M., scouting the two best quarterbacks in college, Andrew Luck of Stanford and Robert Griffin III of Baylor. By December, as the Colts limped toward a 2--14 finish with an injured Manning watching from the sideline, they knew they were preparing for the stunning possibility of having the first pick in another draft with two quarterbacks of immense potential at the top. Bill Polian watched Luck in person three times and Griffin twice, and he was deep into his film and personality study of both prospects when Irsay called him into his office on Jan. 2 and fired him. Chris was fired too. They never saw it coming. And there went all the work on Luck and Griffin.

This would have been a much tougher call than Manning over Leaf, Polian said last week. Both Luck and Griffin are extremely talented players with Eagle Scout characters. Both have the football brain to process offensive adjustments quickly and under pressure. But in the end the quality that would seem to be Griffin's greatest advantage—his tremendous mobility and speed—could end up being what makes Luck the first pick. Here's why: All quarterbacks get hit and are subject to injury, obviously. But mobile quarterbacks are especially vulnerable. Michael Vick has played all 16 games in a season just once. Tim Tebow was repeatedly slammed during the Broncos' playoff loss at New England in January and came away from that game with rib and chest injuries.

So, given the choice in 2012, whom would Polian take? "Probably Luck," he said. "When you boil it down you worry a little about running quarterbacks getting hurt. But it's close. Very close. If Manning and Leaf were apples and oranges, I'd say Luck and Griffin are McIntosh and Red Delicious."

When you meet Robert Griffin III, you're instantly impressed with his genial presence and his savviness. He's not just a glad-hander. He answers questions expansively and earnestly. "He's got a way to make you feel at ease when you first meet him," says Chiefs coach Romeo Crennel, who interviewed Griffin at the scouting combine in February. "Not only he is very sharp about football, but he's sharp about life. He's not going to have trouble adjusting to our game."

It's all but a lock that Luck goes to Indianapolis first in next week's draft, followed by Griffin to Washington. Griffin has met at length with Redskins coach Mike Shanahan, and more with offensive coordinator Kyle Shanahan, who has visited Griffin in Texas and spent sessions going over the Washington offense. And, of course, the Redskins pulled off one of the biggest trades in history last month to move up to the No. 2 spot, swapping first-round positions with the Rams and giving them first-round picks in 2013 and '14 and a second-round pick this year. And Griffin is ready to adjust to whichever team takes him. "I'm going to assimilate to the culture of the team that picks me, on the field and in the locker room," he says. "I'm not coming into the NFL with, let's say, five plays from Baylor that I love and saying to the offensive coordinator, 'Hey, we have to run these.' That's not my job. I just want to fit in."

As for how much he runs, and gets exposed to big hits, that's going to be a balancing act in the NFL. Mike Shanahan would be foolish to tether to the pocket a man who was a semifinalist in the 400-meter hurdles at the 2008 Olympic trials. But the one aspect that worried two personnel men last week was Griffin's ability to protect himself outside the pocket. He rushed 179 times last fall for 699 yards, and because he has such a physically imposing upper body, he didn't shy from open-field hits. Against Texas A&M last October, Griffin scrambled toward the sideline and was two steps out of bounds when he was blasted by an Aggies defender and sent flying hard into the bench area, prompting a personal-foul flag. Those are the kind of scary hits that mobile quarterbacks often absorb.

It's a game of roulette. Three quarterbacks had more than 75 rushing attempts last year, and two got hurt. Cam Newton ran the ball 126 times in 16 games and stayed healthy. Tebow had 130 attempts in 13 starts (including the playoffs) and was beat up by season's end. Vick had 76 carries in 13 games; he suffered a concussion and missed three games with broken ribs. In the 32 games Shanahan has coached in Washington, his quarterbacks have run the ball 62 times, total. When Shanahan had the mobile Jake Plummer in Denver, Plummer missed only five games in four seasons due to injury. He knew how to protect himself outside the pocket, and Shanahan didn't put him at undue risk very often. That's the way the Redskins will have to use Griffin, who must expose himself to fewer big hits at the NFL level. Shanahan won't want to take away Griffin's ability to improvise on big third downs, but you can be sure his coaches will stress to him that he must be a pocket passer—which is what Griffin, in an interview with SI at the combine, said he wants to be.

Mike Shanahan, who was Steve Young's offensive coordinator from 1992 to '94, should show Griffin video of Young as he matured into a great quarterback. In his last five NFL seasons Young averaged 47 rushing attempts a season. He is the last mobile quarterback to play at a Hall of Fame level. Last week Young said that he'd tell Griffin one thing above all: Do the work. "Most guys who are mobile use it as a crutch," Young says. "When a play looks like it's breaking down, they take off. And they win games that way, so they begin to play that way. But if you know the offense inside and out, you're most often going to find somewhere to go with the ball, so you won't have to expose yourself to the hits.

"Being mobile is not a negative," Young says, "as long as you're intellectually disciplined. As long as Robert Griffin becomes a master of his offense, with the way he moves, he can be great."

Although Griffin is quicker in the pocket and faster out of it, it's a mistake to assume Luck isn't athletic. As Manning did at Tennessee, Luck consistently evaded pressure at Stanford, making smart decisions and sharp throws on the run. At this point Griffin has a quicker release and a consistently better deep ball, but Baylor's speedier wideouts allowed him to go downfield more often. When Luck had his Pro Day workout in March, his last pass traveled 76 yards, a tight spiral, and hit his receiver in the hands. The kid dropped it. (Luck does have one hitch in his delivery: He sometimes lifts his back leg as he throws, lessening the speed of his pass.)

The Colts, virtually stripped bare by a new front office and coaching staff, are starting over. The Redskins are in Year 3 of a rebuilding program; they will have a better offensive line and receiving corps than Indianapolis; they were a respectable 13th in team defense; and they beat the Super Bowl champion Giants twice by double digits. "Luck is as far along in the pro game as any [college] quarterback I've ever seen," says former Ravens coach Brian Billick, "but RG3 is going to have a better rookie year. He'll have more assets around him."

Luck does have more experience in an NFL-style offense, though at times Stanford's attack looked like the Packers of the '60s. Tapes of the 2011 season show clearly that the Cardinal ran a power offense often keyed to the running game. Against Oregon last season Stanford lined up on two straight plays, and not in short yardage, with Luck under center, and a three-man I formation behind him: tight end, fullback and tailback. Both times the tight end went in motion but returned to wham-block a defensive lineman after the snap. Stanford gained 12 yards on the first play, eight on the second.

Mind you, these were both plays Luck could have audibled out of but didn't. He ran what served his offense best. "I could make an argument that he cost himself the Heisman by calling so many runs when he knew he could rack up big yards throwing it," says Stanford coach David Shaw.

Coaches like that. Luck's got a conscience. When in doubt, he's safe and in control.

Griffin's just as conscientious, though. When he learns his offense, you probably won't hear anyone ever calling him selfish, or a shortcutter. And that's what's so compelling about Griffin and Luck. Fans are going to watch these two for years and debate who's better. They're the story of the 2012 draft—and they could be the story of the NFL for the next decade.

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PETER KING'S MOCK DRAFT

The top two selections are all but locked in, but there's plenty of intrigue attached to the decisions of the next 30 teams on the clock in the first round. As the league's offensive explosion continues, protecting the passer—and finding him targets to throw to—will be among the top priorities when it comes time to make the call

1 COLTS

WILL PICK

Andrew Luck, QB, Stanford

SHOULD PICK

Andrew Luck, QB, Stanford

Tough duty ahead for Luck, who'll be fortunate in 2012 to win as many games as the Colts' last No. 1 overall, Peyton Manning, did as a rookie in 1998 (three). Indy has been stripped bare of stars (except for graybeards Reggie Wayne, 33, and Dwight Freeney, 32) and needs to be sure it doesn't overhype Luck's arrival. It'll be a long road back to the playoffs.

2 REDSKINS

WILL PICK

Robert Griffin III, QB, Baylor

SHOULD PICK

Robert Griffin III, QB, Baylor

This way to the backseat, Stephen Strasburg and Alex Ovechkin and John Wall, there's a new sports phenom in Washington. If the electrifying Griffin is even 85% the QB that Cam Newton was as a rookie last year—and he could well be—the Skins will be reborn, and the only person in the nation's capital getting more press will be Barack Obama.

3 VIKINGS

WILL PICK

Matt Kalil, T, USC

SHOULD PICK

Morris Claiborne, CB, LSU

I don't get it. I know the Vikes want to protect Christian Ponder from eternal damnation (and a boatload of sacks), but they have six games a year against Aaron Rodgers, Jay Cutler and Matthew Stafford, who'll throw a combined 100 TD passes each season. Minnesota's secondary is horrible—even worse than its offensive line. The Vikings don't need a corner. They need two.

4 BROWNS

WILL PICK

Trent Richardson, RB, Alabama

SHOULD PICK

Justin Blackmon, WR, Oklahoma State

That's right—I wouldn't take quarterback Ryan Tannehill here. I'd take the guy who gives Cleveland's offense a chance to shape up for Colt McCoy or whoever the QB of the future is. (See pick 27.) Blackmon and Greg Little would give the Browns their first set of topflight wide receivers since the franchise returned to the league in 1999.

5 BUCCANEERS

WILL PICK

Morris Claiborne, CB, LSU

SHOULD PICK

Morris Claiborne, CB, LSU

Ronde Barber is 37, and free agent corner Eric Wright is plenty leaky, so this is Tampa Bay's position of greatest long-term need. The Tigers trusted Claiborne on an island; as a pro he'll have to hold his own against NFC South gunslingers Drew Brees, Cam Newton and Matt Ryan if the Bucs are going to have a chance to be competitive.

6 RAMS

WILL PICK

Justin Blackmon, WR, Oklahoma State

SHOULD PICK

Justin Blackmon, WR, Oklahoma State

Consider it a gift for quarterback Sam Bradford. The Rams love Trent Richardson (join the club), and the 6'1", 207-pound Blackmon doesn't have the size they prefer: Calvin Johnson has him by four inches and 29 pounds. But St. Louis is woefully deficient at receiver, and Blackmon's ability to get open on quick slants and deep routes is beyond instinctive.

7 JAGUARS

WILL PICK

Stephon Gilmore, CB, South Carolina

SHOULD PICK

David DeCastro, G, Stanford

Like Tampa, Jacksonville has a major hole at cornerback, and I hear the Jags like Gilmore a ton, which would have to be the case for them to reach for him here. Still, I'd solve a position of need for the next 10 years with the second-best offensive lineman in the draft—and a guy with the mean streak Jacksonville's O-line needs—then take the corner in round 2.

8 DOLPHINS

WILL PICK

Ryan Tannehill, QB, Texas A&M

SHOULD PICK

Ryan Tannehill, QB, Texas A&M

If you're going to trust the coach you hired (Joe Philbin) to energize the offense and the coordinator you hired (Mike Sherman, who coached Tannehill in college) to tutor the quarterback, you've got to pick the triggerman they want. But you can't panic by moving up to take Tannehill, because that would most likely cost at least a second-rounder. Not worth it.

9 PANTHERS

WILL PICK

Fletcher Cox, DT, Mississippi State

SHOULD PICK

Fletcher Cox, DT, Mississippi State

Carolina G.M. Marty Hurney doesn't like risky choices this high in the draft, and coach Ron Rivera is desperate for a penetrating defensive tackle. Cox had 19½ combined sacks and tackles for loss last season in the SEC, and I'm betting the Panthers view him as a safer selection, in terms of productivity and reliability, than combine phenom Dontari Poe.

10 BILLS

WILL PICK

Michael Floyd, WR, Notre Dame

SHOULD PICK

Mark Barron, S, Alabama

Buffalo will break the Cardinals' hearts by stealing Floyd to pair with Stevie Johnson and give quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick a true second weapon and bona fide deep threat. But I'd rather have the kind of enforcer in the secondary that so many teams covet. The 6'1", 213-pound Barron is a player whom multiple teams will try to trade up to get.

11 CHIEFS

WILL PICK

Luke Kuechly, LB, Boston College

SHOULD PICK

Luke Kuechly, LB, Boston College

The alltime leading tackler in both school and Atlantic Coast Conference history is the perfect player for Kansas City G.M. Scott Pioli: whistle-clean character, great instincts. Kuechly isn't overwhelmingly physical, though. I'd like Dontari Poe here if I were sure he could consistently deliver on the athletic promise he showed at the combine.

12 SEAHAWKS

WILL PICK

Melvin Ingram, DE, South Carolina

SHOULD PICK

Mark Barron, S, Alabama

One note: Seattle will take Ryan Tannehill if he's there at 12. Write it down. If he's not, Ingram is the kind of versatile rush guy Pete Carroll could use both outside and inside; he had 25 tackles behind the line in 2011. Barron? Even with the Seahawks' terrific secondary, his addition would mean Carroll could play three thumping safeties on every down but first.

13 CARDINALS

WILL PICK

David DeCastro, G, Stanford

SHOULD PICK

David DeCastro, G, Stanford

When offensive-line coach Russ Grimm sees DeCastro, he sees a young Russ Grimm: nasty, efficient, mistake-free. And though I'm sure that the Cardinals would love to see Michael Floyd fall to them here, the best guard to come out in several years is a good consolation prize, especially for a team that's had nothing but trouble on the O-line.

14 COWBOYS

WILL PICK

Mark Barron, S, Alabama

SHOULD PICK

Mark Barron, S, Alabama

I wouldn't be surprised to see Dallas trade up to make sure it gets Barron, perhaps with Kansas City at 11. The Cowboys have no identity in the secondary. No big-time players either. Barron would immediately boost a unit that's been beaten down—and provide the kind of tackler at safety that the Boys haven't had since Darren Woodson.

15 EAGLES

WILL PICK

Quinton Coples, DE, North Carolina

SHOULD PICK

Courtney Upshaw, DE/OLB, Alabama

One coach used these words to me about Coples: "Gifted. Sporadic." We're getting to the part of the draft—mid first round—where beauty's in the eye of the beholder, and teams reach for pass rushers who often don't pan out. Philly D-line coach Jim Washburn is as demanding as they come, and Coples will have a chance to make the Eagles more formidable up front.

16 JETS

WILL PICK

Dontari Poe, DT, Memphis

SHOULD PICK

Dontari Poe, DT, Memphis

Rex Ryan's gleeful. Deep down he knows Poe has a chance to be another Haloti Ngata, a freakishly talented interior force against the run and pass. But Poe isn't known for being freakishly productive—five sacks in three years at Memphis—and Ryan and coordinator Mike Pettine will have their work cut out to make him a top NFL starter.

17 BENGALS

WILL PICK

Courtney Upshaw, DE/OLB, Alabama

SHOULD PICK

Courtney Upshaw, DE/OLB, Alabama

Good move by the Bengals—instead of holding their defensive line together with spare parts, they're giving defensive coordinator Mike Zimmer a true three-down end who not only rushed the passer in college but also dropped into coverage effectively. If he's still on the board when Cincinnati picks, the choice won't be hard.

18 CHARGERS

WILL PICK

Riley Reiff, T, Iowa

SHOULD PICK

Riley Reiff, T, Iowa

Marcus McNeill is gone, and no one in San Diego should believe that Jared Gaither is the long-term answer at left tackle. Reiff is a scrapper and a fighter in the tradition of Hawkeyes linemen, but he may not last this long given the tackle-needy teams drafting ahead of the Chargers, most notably the Bills, Seahawks, Cardinals and Jets.

19 BEARS

WILL PICK

Kendall Wright, WR, Baylor

SHOULD PICK

Jonathan Martin, T, Stanford

I'd be stunned if Chicago doesn't fortify its perpetually patchwork offensive line, but I've been stunned before. Coach Lovie Smith had dinner with Wright at Baylor's pro day in March, and I hear he was impressed—enough so to select Wright to go with Brandon Marshall, creating a suddenly formidable wideout corps for quarterback Jay Cutler.

20 TITANS

WILL PICK

Whitney Mercilus, DE, Illinois

SHOULD PICK

Shea McClellin, OLB, Boise State

This is a good season: 16 sacks, nine forced fumbles. That was Mercilus's breakout 2011 campaign at Illinois, and that's why he'll be a first-round pick this year. But he's not as versatile as McClellin, whose stock is rising because he has the speed (a 4.6 40 at 260 pounds) to be an edge rusher and is a sure-enough tackler to play inside if needed.

21 BENGALS

WILL PICK

Dre Kirkpatrick, CB, Alabama

SHOULD PICK

Michael Brockers, DT, LSU

Cincinnati has but one good cover corner, Leon Hall, so Kirkpatrick makes sense here. I wouldn't be surprised to see the Bengals follow the advice of trusted front-office aide John Cooper, the former Ohio State coach, and grab a Big Ten offensive lineman here, but the better pick in my view would be another reinforcement for the defensive line.

22 BROWNS

WILL PICK

Jonathan Martin, T, Stanford

SHOULD PICK

Jonathan Martin, T, Stanford

Love this pick. Right tackle is a trouble spot for Cleveland—waiver pickup Oniel Cousins is the nominal No. 1 on the depth chart right now—and Martin, who helped protect Andrew Luck, should be able to win the job in camp. If not, the Browns can take their time and groom him to be Joe Thomas's bookend. Not a sexy choice, but a smart one.

23 RAVENS FROM LIONS

WILL PICK

Dont'a Hightower, LB, Alabama

SHOULD PICK

Dont'a Hightower, LB, Alabama

For years Baltimore has wanted a top-shelf playmaking linebacker to be trained by Ray Lewis. Here he is. I see the Ravens swapping first-round spots with Detroit (who'll receive a third-rounder too) to sneak in front of the Steelers, because Hightower is a Dick LeBeau special—heavy and fast. Another positive: He was a two-year captain for Nick Saban.

24 STEELERS

WILL PICK

Kevin Zeitler, G, Wisconsin

SHOULD PICK

Kevin Zeitler, G, Wisconsin

Pittsburgh's got to stop treating its offensive-line problems with stopgaps and take a tough guy like Zeitler, whom I've heard compared to Logan Mankins. A 6'4", 315-pound masher, Zeitler will step in on opening day next to Maurkice Pouncey and give the Steelers the stability in front of Ben Roethlisberger that they've lacked for the last several years.

25 BRONCOS

WILL PICK

Michael Brockers, DT, LSU

SHOULD PICK

Michael Brockers, DT, LSU

Denver will be stunned that Brockers is still on the board. And delighted. The Broncos lost free-agent defensive tackle Brodrick Bunkley to the Saints a month ago, and this raw but promising 6'5" 322-pounder could play nose or a more versatile tackle role. "On potential," one coach told me, "Brockers deserves to be a top 10 pick."

26 TEXANS

WILL PICK

Rueben Randle, WR, LSU

SHOULD PICK

Stephen Hill, WR, Georgia Tech

Kendall Wright makes sense if he lasts this long, but Randle is a good fallback. Houston thinks that at 6'4" and 210 pounds he'll be another matchup problem along the lines of Andre Johnson. What team has the corners to cover two wideouts 6'3" or taller? Then again, if that's the logic, I'd take Hill, who's bigger (6'5") and a speed threat.

27 BROWNS FROM PATS

WILL PICK

Brandon Weeden, QB, Oklahoma State

SHOULD PICK

Brandon Weeden, QB, Oklahoma State

Cleveland sends a third-rounder to New England to move up 10 spots, from 37 to 27, and prevent the other Weeden fans—Chiefs, Eagles, Bills, Niners—from grabbing him. I know he'll be 29 in October, but if you think a player can be a good starting quarterback in the league for eight years, and several teams do, he's worth a lot more than the 27th pick.

28 PACKERS

WILL PICK

Jerel Worthy, DT, Michigan State

SHOULD PICK

Doug Martin, RB, Boise State

Worthy would be the long-term replacement for Cullen Jenkins, though I could see G.M. Ted Thompson going for a big-potential outside threat like Nick Perry or Shea McClellin as a bookend pass rusher for Clay Matthews. Martin is the kind of versatile cold-weather back who would fit the Pack perfectly. "He's this draft's Ray Rice," one personnel man told me.

29 LIONS FROM BROWNS

WILL PICK

Amini Silatolu, G/T, Midwestern State

SHOULD PICK

Mike Adams, T, Ohio State

Upset special of the first round. The Lions loved Silatolu when he visited them, and they probably can't wait until their second-round pick (54th) to get him. Powerfully based and more explosive than he looks at 6'4" and 312 pounds, he could succeed Jeff Backus at left tackle, where Silatolu dominated Division II opponents for two years.

30 49ERS

WILL PICK

Coby Fleener, TE, Stanford

SHOULD PICK

Stephen Hill, WR, Georgia Tech

Jim Harbaugh likes smart, physical, versatile skill players, and because he had Fleener for four years at Stanford (including Fleener's redshirt season of 2007), no coach knows a player in this draft better. Fleener isn't as athletic as Vernon Davis, but he did gain 17.8 yards per reception in his last two seasons for the Cardinal.

31 PATRIOTS

WILL PICK

Nick Perry, DE, USC

SHOULD PICK

Shea McClellin, OLB, Boise State

All those who know what the Patriots are going to do with this pick, raise your hands. O.K., anybody besides Mike Mayock? After losing Mark Anderson in free agency and without knowing whether soon-to-be 33-year-old Andre Carter will be back—those two combined for 20 of the Pats' 40 sacks in 2011—New England needs an edge rusher. Perry's my best guess.

32 GIANTS

WILL PICK

Harrison Smith, S, Notre Dame

SHOULD PICK

Shea McClellin, OLB, Boise State

A mature four-year starter for the Irish, Smith has the speed to play free safety and the tackling ability to play strong. The Giants could go in a lot of directions here, with McClellin and Mike Adams both possible because of positional need. But a 47-game college starter and eager special-teamer will be too much for G.M. Jerry Reese to pass up.

PHOTOPhotograph by TODD ROSENBERGROBERT GRIFFIN III QB, BAYLOR PHOTOPhotograph by TODD ROSENBERGANDREW LUCK QB, STANFORD PHOTOGREG NELSON (GRIFFIN)RUNNING, A RISK Griffin's electrifying open-field mobility may counterintuitively be his biggest drawback, since it puts him in greater jeopardy of suffering a knockout hit. PHOTOJED JACOBSOHN (LUCK) PHOTOGREG NELSON (GRIFFIN) PHOTOCHARLES BAUS/CAL SPORT MEDIA (KALIL) PHOTOAL TIELEMANS (RICHARDSON) PHOTOSIMON BRUTY (CLAIBORNE) PHOTOJOHN BIEVER (BLACKMON) PHOTORICHEY MILLER/CAL SPORT MEDIA (GILMORE) PHOTOJOHN BIEVER (LUCK)BY THE BOOK Stanford coach Shaw says Luck may have "cost himself the Heisman"—he finished second twice—by sticking to running calls rather than audibling to pass. PHOTOGREG NELSON (TANNEHILL) PHOTOSHELBY DANIEL/ICON SMI (COX) PHOTODAMIAN STROHMEYER (FLOYD) PHOTOMICHAEL TURESKI/ICON SMI (KUECHLY) PHOTOJIM DEDMON/ICON SMI (INGRAM) PHOTOJAMES SNOOK/US PRESSWIRE (DECASTRO) PHOTORANDY LITZINGER/ICON SMI (BARRON) PHOTOMANNY FLORES/CAL SPORTS MEDIA (COPLES) PHOTODOUGLAS JONES/US PRESSWIRE (POE) PHOTORANDY LITZINGER/ICON SMI (UPSHAW) PHOTOCHARLIE NEIBERAGLL/AP (REIFF) PHOTODAVID E. KLUTHO (WRIGHT) PHOTOBRAD SCHLOSS/ICON SMI (MERCILUS) PHOTORANDY LITZINGER/ICON SMI (KIRKPATRICK) PHOTOJAMES SNOOK/US PRESSWIRE (MARTIN) PHOTOBOB ROSATO (HIGHTOWER) PHOTOJEFF HANISCH/US PRESSWIRE (ZEITLER) PHOTOMANNY FLORES/CAL SPORT MEDIA (BROCKERS) PHOTOBILL FRAKES (RANDLE) PHOTOGREG NELSON (WEEDEN) PHOTOAL GOLDIS/AP (WORTHY) PHOTOMATT STRASEN (SILATOLU) PHOTOTOM DIPACE (FLEENER) PHOTORIC TAPIN/ICON SMI (PERRY) PHOTOBRIAN SPURLOCK/US PRESSWIRE (SMITH)

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)