New Guy and Occupy

Golf and politics converged at Benton Shores, where the Senior PGA spawned a virtually unknown winner, Roger Chapman, and a bit of controversy
June 04, 2012

Professional golf rarely intersects with real life. When it does, it's usually awkward. Like on a gusty Saturday morning when a hundred or so Occupy the PGA protestors marched through the modest downtown of Benton Harbor, Mich., carrying a coffin (symbolizing city residents) along with homemade signs with varied messages such as JESUS DON'T GOLF and NICKLAUS DOESN'T KNOW JACK. In other words, last week's 73rd Senior PGA Championship was no ordinary golf event.

This leadoff major (four more "majors" are on tap in the next seven weeks—Gentlemen, recharge your pacemakers) had so many wrinkles, starting with Harbor Shores, a challenging new course with crazy-quilt greens designed by Nicklaus on mostly reclaimed land overlooking Lake Michigan. Fred Funk began his first practice round on the par-5 10th, whose extreme mounds belong in the X Games, and wondered aloud, "Holy s---, is this what we've got the rest of the day?" Despite the fears of Funk and many others, soft conditions led to lights-out scoring on the weekend. The final round featured a nine-under-par 62 (by Kenny Perry), a 63 (Peter Senior) and four 64s.

There was a true Cinderella winner, Roger Chapman, or as most observers called him, Roger Who? Chapman, 53, is a journeyman who got his only European tour victory in 2000 on his 472nd try, in a one-off event in Rio de Janeiro, where he beat Padraig Harrington in a playoff. "I'd give myself a B minus for my career," Chapman said. His previous claims to fame were winning the 1979 English Amateur and beating Hal Sutton in the 1981 Walker Cup at Cypress Point.

Chapman chuckled on Sunday when it was pointed out that he is surely the first major champion born in Kenya. Except he's English. Chapman's father was an agriculture minister for the United Kingdom who moved his family to Kenya for two years, then to Trinidad briefly and finally back to England. "I have an affection for Kenya," Chapman says, "but I'm English through and through. And very proud of it."

Former Masters champ Sandy Lyle, a longtime friend, waited by the scoring trailer after he finished the final round to congratulate Chapman, who got into the field on the strength of his 11th-place finish on the 2011 European Senior tour Order of Merit, on his life-changing victory. "He was always a very good player," Lyle said. "He simply wasn't a prolific winner for some reason."

Chapman didn't look like a journeyman at Harbor Shores, at least not until he stumbled in on the final nine after his lead had grown to nine shots. Chapman hit 62 of 72 greens in regulation, and his third-round 64 was shades of Ben Hogan. "It would've been a good tournament this week if he wasn't around," said Michael Allen, the 2009 Senior PGA Championship winner, who finished 11th.

The win makes Chapman exempt on the Champions tour and earns him a spot in the PGA Championship at the Ocean course on Kiawah Island, S.C., in August. "This is the greatest day of my professional career," Chapman said proudly. "No question about it."

Then there was Hale Irwin, who, rumor has it, may be immortal. A few days before turning 67, Irwin might have snagged a 46th senior title—and an eighth senior major—if his putter had cooperated. In the second round Irwin three-putted his final green for bogey to shoot his age, 66, tripped over an early triple bogey in the third round and still finished third, three shots back. Sometimes it's easy to forget how amazing Irwin is. He is taking golfing longevity to a place where maybe only Sam Snead has been.

Still, there was more to this Senior PGA than golf. There was the Harbor Shores project, which includes a luxury residential community with a marina. It was unusual enough to warrant a big New York Times Magazine piece last December on the somewhat controversial socioeconomic redevelopment plan to revive a dying Rust Belt town. As Jonathan Mahler wrote, "The juxtaposition of Benton Harbor's impoverished population and its two rising monuments to wealth—all wedged into a little more than four square miles—make it almost a caricature of economic disparity in America."

Benton Harbor was a bustling manufacturing center in the 1960s, and its population exceeded 20,000. It's still home to Whirlpool, a Fortune 500 company, but only about 10,000 residents remain. About 90% of them are African-American, and, according to the Times, 60% are getting public aid. Times are tough, but if Harbor Shores becomes a success story, other financially strapped cities will surely try to replicate the model.

Jeff Noel is president of the Whirlpool Foundation, one of three non-profit groups behind Benton Harbor's attempted revival. Noel points to sister city St. Joseph, the affluent suburb to Benton Harbor's urban core. When downtown storefronts in St. Joseph were one-third empty not that many years ago, Noel says, the community cobbled together a low-interest loan program to attract retailers. "Fifteen million dollars later, there's a compass fountain that shoots water in the Curious Kids Museum, a carousel, and all the storefronts are full," Noel says.

Harbor Shores is a marvel in environmental cleanup. The 1st hole was built on the site of a steel mill that closed in the '80s. The 3rd, 4th and 5th holes are on a section of a slag pit used by a brake company. The 14th hole was home to a metal-furniture maker during World War I and became a place where aircraft parts were made, some with radium and mercury, and landed on the government's Superfund toxic waste sites list in the mid-'90s. The 15th hole was a city landfill, while the 16th was an industrial dumping ground.

Meanwhile, the concept for the golf course and housing community in a bankrupt city—Benton Harbor is under the control of an emergency manager, a move made by the state of Michigan after city officials ran up a debt of nearly $5 million—was put on hold for a year to address the city's lack of affordable housing. Former president Jimmy Carter was persuaded to bring Habitat for Humanity to Benton Harbor. Habitat built 22 houses in a week, and since then, 600 homes have been built or renovated.

The progress has been remarkable, but as the Times pointed out, some residents fear redevelopment will lead to their being pushed out in an unofficial class war, or gentrification, as Occupy the PGA terms it on its website. The demonstrators were few in number and varied in their complaints.

"I know some people are frustrated," Noel says. "I can see why some have a sense of hopelessness. I'd hope that those who demonstrated have suggestions, and if they live here, make sure their sons and daughters are enrolled in the Boys and Girls Clubs we've created, come to the M-Tec school we built for job training or get into one of the Habitat homes. We're on a change curve."

The PGA of America bought in two years ago, when the association's CEO, Joe Steranka, learned of Whirlpool's commitment to the area.

"I said, This is like a commercial for We Are Golf," said Steranka, referring to a PGA-supported coalition to grow the game. "We have 530 acres that was transformed from a Superfund site into a five- to seven-hundred-million-dollar development that dramatically increased the tax base and created jobs. Just think, golf was the catalyst that turned this desolate area into an oasis of green space."

There is more to come. More rebuilding, more reviving, more hope and even more golf. And like it or not, the Senior PGA will return to Harbor Shores in 2014.

SI GOLF+

BONUS SECTION | GOLF.COM

SAL'S STAT

Roger Chapman won $378,000 at the Senior PGA. In 41 starts over three years on the European Senior tour he has earned $484,111.

—Sal Johnson

Club Wars

Last week the European tour played the BMW PGA Championship (won by Luke Donald) at the Wentworth Club in Virginia Water, England. The tournament is Europe's version of the Players, yet only three Americans made the trip. Here's a look at how Wentworth stacks up against its PGA Tour competition, the Crowne Plaza Invitational at Colonial (won by Zach Johnson), at Colonial Country Club in Fort Worth, Texas.

DOWN THE ROAD

PHOTOPhotograph by DARREN CARROLLHEADLINERS The journeyman Chapman bolted to the first-round lead and never looked back, while protestors voiced their displeasure about the Benton Shores project outside a Whirlpool office. PHOTOROBERT BECK (DUVAL) PHOTOHUNTER MARTIN/GETTY IMAGES (COLONIAL) PHOTOALBERT PENA/ZUMAPRESS.COM (HOGAN STATUE) PHOTOPATRICK GREEN/ZUMAPRESS.COM (TOMS) PHOTOANDREW REDINGTON/GETTY IMAGES (WENTWORTH) PHOTOANDREW REDINGTON/GETTY IMAGES (CLUBS) PHOTODK LIMITED/CORBIS (PUDDING) PHOTOCRIS BOURONCLE/AFP/GETTY IMAGES (PINOCHET) PHOTOROBERT BECK (GARCIA) PHOTOROBERT BECK (SCOTT) PHOTOROBERT BECK (NORMAN) PHOTOROBERT BECK (MCILROY) PHOTOROBERT BECK (SUITCASES) PHOTOCLIVE BRUNSKILL (HINGIS) PHOTOPAUL BUCK/EPA (IVANOVIC) PHOTOANDREW DIEB/ZUMAPRESS.COM (KUEHNE) PHOTOCHUCK SOLOMON (WILLIAMS) PHOTOHEINZ KLUETMEIER (EVERT) PHOTOCARLOS M. SAAVEDRA (WOZNIACKI)

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)