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Good As New

June 11, 2012
June 11, 2012

Table of Contents
June 11, 2012

LEADING OFF
THE MAIL
Inside: THE WEEK IN SPORTS
JOSH HAMILTON
  • Josh Hamilton has outsized talents and grand plans for the free-agent windfall coming his way. But the Rangers' centerfielder also feels pressure to be larger than life. Through his faith, his family and a more studious approach to the game, he's learning bigger isn't always better

STANLEY CUP FINALS
ROAD TO BRAZIL
BOXING
U.S. DECATHLETES
Departments

Good As New

His no-hitter was special—but more impressive is that Johan Santana is just as effective after shoulder surgery as he was before

We'll have to wait a couple of years to issue the final verdict on the six-year, $137.5 million contract that Johan Santana signed with the Mets before the 2008 season. Last Friday night, however, you couldn't find anyone in Queens who didn't think the deal was a bargain. In the 8,020th game in franchise history, Santana did what Tom Seaver, Dwight Gooden and every other previous Mets hurler couldn't: He threw a no-hitter. In just his 11th start after shoulder surgery cost him the entire 2011 season, Santana threw a career-high 134 pitches against the Cardinals, striking out eight, walking five and creating a million memories for Mets fans.

This is an article from the June 11, 2012 issue

The no-no confirms that the two-time Cy Young Award winner, despite the lost year, is the same great pitcher he was before he got hurt. The shutout lowered his ERA this season to 2.38. He also has 68 strikeouts against 21 walks (an excellent 3.24 K/BB ratio) and a 25.1% strikeout rate. Those numbers compare very favorably with Santana's preinjury performance: From 2008 through '10 he had a 2.85 ERA, a 3.02 K/BB ratio and a 20.0% strikeout rate.

We've become accustomed to seeing pitchers undergo Tommy John surgery and return to their former performance levels. But for Santana to return from surgery on the anterior capsule in his left shoulder is another thing entirely. Doctors don't have nearly the success repairing shoulders that they have with elbows.

Santana has lost something, however. A pitcher who once threw 93 mph is averaging 88 mph with his fastball this season. What Santana has managed to do, however, is modulate his changeup accordingly. The sweet spot for a pitcher is a 10-mph gap between his fastball and change. Santana, who at his peak paired his 93-mph heater with an 82-mph change, is now throwing his changeup at 78. For a fastball-changeup pitcher (four of every five deliveries from Santana are one or the other), velocity matters less than speed differentials, and Santana changes speeds just as effectively as he did when he was the best pitcher in baseball.

He may not get back to that level, largely because he can't carry a 220-inning workload, and major league hitters will make life hard on occasion for pitchers who work in the high 80s. However, Santana has come through surgery with both the physical ability and the skill adjustments to be the Mets' ace for the rest of his time in New York.

Manny Happy Returns?

On May 30, his 40th birthday, Manny Ramirez finished his 50-game suspension for violating baseball's PED policy. As of Monday the A's, who in February signed him to a minor league deal, hadn't activated him—no shock considering Ramirez was 9 for 37 with no extra-base hits in 11 games with Triple A Sacramento. Still, it's easy to see why Oakland took a flier on Ramirez even after years of decline. Here's how five recent sluggers performed at age 40. There can be an upside to signing a great hitter at an advanced age.

JIM THOME

TWINS, INDIANS

2011

.256/.361/.477 15 HRs, 46 BBs in 324 plate appearances

JIM EDMONDS

BREWERS, REDS

2010

.276/.342/.504 11 HRs, 23 doubles in 272 plate appearances

GARY SHEFFIELD

METS

2009

.276/.372/.451 10 HRs, 40 BBs in 312 plate appearances

MOISES ALOU

METS

2007

.341/.392/.524 13 HRs, 19 doubles in 360 plate appearances

EDGAR MARTINEZ

MARINERS

2003

.294/.406/.489 24 HRs, 92 BBs in 603 plate appearances

PHOTOMARC LEVINE/NEW YORK METS (SANTANA)UNCHARTED TERRITORY To nail down the first no-no in Mets history, Santana had to reach a career-high pitch count.PHOTOJIM THOMPSON/ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL/ZUMAPRESS.COM (RAMIREZ)PHOTOMARK DUNCAN/AP (THOME)PHOTOJOHN BIEVER (EDMONDS)PHOTODARREN CARROLL (SHEFFIELD)PHOTOJOHN IACONO (ALOU)PHOTOTOM DIPACE (MARTINEZ)