Search

JUST MY TYPE

Sept. 17, 2012
Sept. 17, 2012

Table of Contents
Sept. 17, 2012

LEADING OFF
THE MAIL
Inside: THE WEEK IN SPORTS
PEYTON MANNING
PARALYMPICS
  • Eleven years after he lost his legs and nearly his life in a gruesome crash, former open-wheel driver Alex Zanardi is still a speed racer—as a decorated Paralympic handcyclist

COLLEGE FOOTBALL
NASCAR 2012 CHASE PREVIEW
The Boy They Couldn't Kill
  • Thirteen years ago, NFL receiver Rae Carruth conspired to kill his pregnant girlfriend and their unborn son. The child has not only survived but thrived—thanks to the unwavering love of his grandmother

JUST MY TYPE

WELL-DRESSED MAN

This is an article from the Sept. 17, 2012 issue

DWYANE WADE

The Heat star is spending the off-season promoting his book A Father First and clothes shopping for next season's postgame press conferences.

DAN PATRICK:Did you play football in high school?

DWYANE WADE: I actually did.

DP:What position?

DW: A little wide receiver, a little cornerback.

DP:Were you good enough to play in college?

DW: No.

DP:LeBron thinks he can play in the NFL.

DW: We all think we could do other things. Just like a lot of artists think they can hoop in the NBA.

DP:Who's an artist who can play?

DW: Chris Brown can play a little bit.

DP:Have you played against Justin Bieber?

DW: I haven't played against Biebs. I heard he can play. I saw him play in a celebrity game, but he was playing against other celebrities.

DP:Have you ever walked by a court and joined a pickup game?

DW: I did it last season. We played the Knicks in New York. I went shopping and saw some kids playing across the street. I've always wanted to do it. I was like, I'm going for it. I went out and played three-on-three with the kids. I really enjoyed it.

DP:Did you dunk on anyone?

DW: No. I had my shirt tucked in kind of tight, so I couldn't get my arms up.

DP:Who came up with the Heat's postgame wardrobe competition?

DW: I don't know. But it's taken on a life of its own. It's cool to see everyone getting into fashion. They've opened the doors to athletes. They've accepted us.

DP:How have you taken advantage?

DW: In Miami, I've always been a dresser. I just took it to another level, and I'm the one they talk about sometimes. I was just at Fashion's Night Out [in New York] with [Vogue editor] Anna Wintour. It's taken me places I looked at from afar.

DP:All right, but can you put lenses in those glasses?

DW: LeBron started it. Then our team did it for a little while. We didn't think it was going to get out there.

DP:Are you more surprised that Dwight Howard or Steve Nash ended up with the Lakers?

DW: Steve Nash. After New Jersey kind of got out of [the Howard sweepstakes], I felt the Lakers would swoop in. That's what they do. The Lakers always come up with some massive move to put themselves in a position to win a championship. But Steve Nash, I didn't see that one coming at all. I thought [Nash] would probably be in New York.

DP:How long was it before you started to see chemistry in Miami, after LeBron and Chris Bosh came aboard?

DW: I thought last season [2010--11] we started to get chemistry midseason. But we still needed more time to get comfortable with each other. So it took this season to be successful with the talent that we have.

DP:How's the knee?

DW: The knee is good.

DP:If I got 10 tries, could I score on you?

DW: No.

DP:That means you must be 100 percent.

DW: No, if I was 50 percent, you wouldn't score.

"If you're Captain Obvious this time of year, you're going to lose 'em. I don't want to insult their intelligence. They get it. If you start stating the obvious, quite frankly, it's a slap in the face."
—BUCK SHOWALTER, Orioles manager, on preparing his team for the pressure of a pennant race

GUEST SHOTS

SAY WHAT?

Matt Barkley gave credit for USC's offensive prowess to receivers Robert Woods and Marqise Lee. "They could play in the NFL right now—both talentwise and how they understand the game," Barkley told me. "If you watch them on plays when they're not getting the ball, they're really team players, which separates them from everyone else." ... Denver Post columnist Mark Kiszla commented on Peyton Manning's impact on the city. "As crazy as this town was about Tim Tebow," Kiszla said, "Peyton erased it from Denver's collective memory. He must have one of those Men in Black devices." ... The Falcons' Matt Ryan offered his theory on why so many young QBs are starting around the league: "The amount of time college athletes are spending on campus preparing with coaches is probably as much as NFL guys are [in the off-season]." ... I asked Braves third baseman Chipper Jones if he is having enough fun to rethink his decision to retire. "When I'm out there between the lines, I'm focused and ready to go," Jones said, "but when the season's over, there's going to be a part of me that's going to take a deep breath and say, I'm glad it's over."

PHOTOMICHAEL J. LEBRECHT II/1DEUCE3 PHOTOGRAPHY (PATRICK)PHOTOMIMMO CARRIERO/OLYCOM/ABACAUSA.COM (WADE)PHOTOBOB ROSATO (JONES)PHOTOBOB ROSATO (RYAN)PHOTOCYRUS MCCRIMMON/COURTESY OF THE DENVER POST (KISZLA)PHOTOJOHN W. MCDONOUGH (BARKLEY)