Tim Layden's story on Johnny Evers (Tinker to Evers to Chance ... to Me) is one of the best written and most-moving articles I have read in SPORTS ILLUSTRATED. We all have family who have passed on and whom we wish we could connect with to better understand who we are. Layden's exploration of his ancestry proved to be just as compelling as Evers's legacy.

Robert Aaron Greenberg, Cherry Hill, N.J.

Getting Ahead of Yourself

In Stewart Mandel's column, Selectoral College (SCORECARD), he mentions that the controversial call in the Oct. 13 Notre Dame--Stanford game in which the referee ruled that Cardinal running back Stepfan Taylor's forward progress had been stopped before he reached the end zone "cost the Cardinal a playoff spot." The truth is, even if Taylor had scored on that play, the game would have been 20--19 at best. It is unfair to assume that Stanford would have made the extra point or would have come out on top in the second overtime.

Alan Reisinger, Avon Lake, Ohio

Just for the Record

I couldn't agree more with Phil Taylor's assessment that breaking sports records has become a joke (POINT AFTER). I will never forget how disgusted I was when Brett Favre basically laid down on the field to give Michael Strahan the single-season sacks record in 2002. That brazen act rendered the record meaningless.

Jack Weiss, Wilmington, N.C.

I have always thought that there was one record in the sports books that was a bit distorted and deserved an asterisk: Cal Ripken Jr.'s consecutive games record. Ripken's streak should have ended the moment the major league baseball players went on strike on Aug. 12, 1994. The players were not locked out by the owners; rather they walked out. Since Ripken was a part of the players' association he, too, chose not to play, thus ending his consecutive-game streak.

Rick Midddleton, Carleton Place, Ont.

No Hustle in His Game

I loved your story on Houston general manager Daryl Morey (Moneyballsy). There is no better example of the essence of Morey's refreshing take on undervalued basketball players than your picture of the five Rockets running downcourt with laser-focus intensity as they initiate their transition offense, while Carmelo Anthony languishes in the background and fails to get back on defense.

Greg Collins, Chevy Chase, Md.

Healing Power

Peter King's article on Andrew Luck and the recovery of Colts coach Chuck Pagano (Chuckstrong, Luckstrong) really captured how both men have inspired a city and brought back the winning spark to a deflated Colts franchise. Seeing Luck's success this season has helped heal the wounds brought on by Peyton Manning's departure from Indianapolis last spring.

Tim Solon, Denver

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FEEDBACK

Who do you think should be NFL Comeback Player of the Year, Adrian Peterson or Peyton Manning?

Brett Michael Hughes: Peterson. He tore both his left ACL and MCL last December, and many people didn't think he was going to be the same after that. Instead, he's come back even better.

David Walker: Manning. I think a neck injury is a bit more serious than a knee injury. Plus, Manning was cut by the Colts and had to start over in Denver with new teammates, a new offense and new coaches.

Steve Schnurstein: Manning, for sure. Peterson played in 12 games last season, so how can his return be a real comeback?

Rempel Design and Photo: Peterson all the way. It hasn't even been a year since he tore his ACL and MCL and he's leading the league in rushing (1,600 yards). Besides, he gets pounded by opposing defenses at least 20 times a game, while Manning gets touched maybe five to 10 times per game.

Brian Zabady: Manning, and it shouldn't even be close. Peterson may have gotten his knee shredded, but Manning's neck was also shredded. He had four surgeries and missed an entire year trying to recover. The nerves in his neck were damaged to the point where his range of motion had to be restored.

TWEET OF THE WEEK

"JERRY SEINFELD BECOMES ARBITRATOR FOR NHL LOCKOUT, SAVES SEASON BY REPEATEDLY ASKING, 'WHAT'S THE DEAL?' UNTIL BOTH SIDES COME TO AGREEMENT"

LA PETITE BORT (@IMPORTANT_CELEB)

PHOTODAVID E. KLUTHO (COVER)FOR Dec. 3, 2012 PHOTOPETER READ MILLER (MANNING) PHOTOTWITTER.COM (TWEET) PHOTO

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