Let's Make a Deal

How the week's two historic settlements stack up
January 14, 2013

The NHL's most recent lockout—the league's third since the 1994--95 season—came to a merciful end early on Sunday morning when commissioner Gary Bettman and players' association head Don Fehr announced they had settled on the framework of a new collective bargaining agreement. Here's how hockey's drawn-out labor struggle, which wiped out nearly half the season, compared with the recent Congressional negotiations on matters of even greater importance.

[The following text appears within a chart. Please see hardcopy or PDF for actual chart.]

FISCAL CLIFF

NHL LOCKOUT

Money Difference

Fiscal Cliff: $650 billion

President's first proposal was for $1.55 trillion in new tax revenue; GOP countered with proposal for $850 billion in new revenue.

NHL Lockout: $462 million

Owners wanted to cut the players' share of the NHL's $3.3 billion in revenue from 57% to 43%.

Roots of Conflict

Fiscal Cliff: In December 2010, Congress extended the Bush tax cuts through Dec. 31, 2012.

NHL Lockout: In July 2005, the NHL and NHLPA agreed on a salary cap of $39 million, as players accepted a 24% salary rollback.

Presidential Statements

This is not class warfare. It's math.

Do right by your fans.

Length of Negotiations

33 Days

191 Days

Regrettable Comments

Fiscal Cliff: John Boehner, speaker of the House, to Senate majority leader Harry Reid: "Go f--- yourself."

NHL Lockout: Panthers winger Kris Versteeg: "... you got to cut out the cancers, and ... [deputy commissioner] Bill Daly and Bettman, they've been looting this game for far too long."

PHOTOMEDIOIMAGES/PHOTODISC/GETTY IMAGES (MONEY) PHOTODAVID E. KLUTHO (BETTMAN) PHOTOSAUL LOEB/AFP/GETTY IMAGES (OBAMA) PHOTOALEX WONG/GETTY IMAGES (BUSH) CHART PHOTO

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)