THE MAIL

May 27, 2013

I want to thank Thomas Lake for his feature on athletes who drive under the influence. Too many of us average Joes, myself included, have gotten behind the wheel after a night of drinking when we clearly should not have, and thought nothing of it because we made it home without incident. Unfortunately, that's what keeps the cycle going. Lake's article had a profound impact on my change in attitude regarding drinking and driving.

Edgar Dickson, Richmond

Ethical Decisions

I am a high school guidance counselor and head football coach who works with teenagers to help them make more positive decisions in life. I appreciated Thomas Lake's story on Josh Brent and Jerry Brown (Drinking, Driving and Dying) because it reinforces the message that I am trying to teach my students: Negative actions have negative consequences. I applaud the people at MADD for their commitment and efforts to reduce the number of deaths by drunken driving. Although tragic stories like this make it appear as if MADD's message is falling on deaf ears, I have seen firsthand that our youth are still watching and listening.

Erik Ormberg, Bellingham, Mass.

Good Things Come in Threes

In addition to the Heat's much-ballyhooed perimeter shooters (Space Odyssey), guard Norris Cole is now lighting it up from behind the arc for Miami, shooting 68.8% from three-point range in the playoffs (81.8% against the Bulls in the conference semis). All credit should go to Pat Riley, who over the past two seasons added Cole, Ray Allen and Shane Battier to the roster to help improve the team's depth from long range.

Jeffrey Hecht, Delray Beach, Fla.

Gift of Life

I loved Steve Rushin's essay about Cameron Lyle (POINT AFTER) and his decision to forgo the remainder of his final spring track season to donate bone marrow and save a life. Lyle's story reminded me of Villanova head football coach Andy Talley and his bone-marrow foundation, through which he has been encouraging college athletes to donate bone marrow since 1992. In 2010, Matt Szczur, who was an All-America wide receiver and an outfielder for the Wildcats' baseball team, gave stem cells to a 19-month-old leukemia patient.

Bill Friel, Dayton

Head to Head

I disagree with Michael Rosenberg's assertion that the Sidney Crosby--Alex Ovechkin rivalry has lost steam (Jaw-Dropping). Both players are candidates for the Hart Trophy, given to the NHL's most valuable player. In 2013, Crosby was second in the league in assists (41), while Ovechkin led the league in goals (32). Sure, Crosby is known for coming back from his injuries and making an immediate impact for the Penguins. But Ovechkin rarely misses a game, and his durability was a major part of the Capitals' resurgence this season. Their rivalry is alive and well.

Timothy D. Kelly, Rockville, Md.

Contact

SPORTS ILLUSTRATED

Letters

E-mail SI at letters@SI.timeinc.com or fax SI at 212-467-2417. Letters should include the writer's full name, address and home telephone number and may be edited for clarity and space.

Customer Service and Subscriptions

For 24/7 service, go to SI.com/customerservice. Call 1-800-528-5000 or write to SI at P.O. Box 30602, Tampa, FL 33630-0602. To purchase reprints of SI covers, go to SIcovers.com.

Advertising

For ad rates, an editorial calendar or a media kit, e-mail SI at SIpubqueries@timeinc.com.

SOCIAL MEDIA

Do you agree with Phil Jackson's claim that Michael Jordan was a better leader, shooter and defender than Kobe Bryant?

Justin Robert Disagree. I love Phil and respect his opinion, but Kobe is a better shooter. Yes, MJ was an all-around better player, but Kobe not only bests him in shooting but also might even be a better defender.

Leo Chung Jordan was quicker and more athletic. Kobe shoots the ball better, but he takes too many ill-advised shots, which drives down his shooting percentage.

Michael Hopfinger I agree with everything Jackson said. Kobe wasn't even the best player on his team during the Lakers' title run in the early 2000s. Shaq was.

Kevin Oley Kobe and MJ are quite similar when it comes to being a team leader: They both berated and abused their teammates because they felt those guys could never match their level of greatness. Michael eventually learned to trust his teammates more, so that took some pressure off him—a lesson Kobe has yet to fully embrace.

TWEET OF THE WEEK

"I JUST WATCHED CHRIS PEREZ WALK BRENDAN RYAN [.173 BA] ON 6 PITCHES. DO YOU REALIZE WHAT KIND OF CONTROL A GUY MUST HAVE TO WALK BRENDO?"

DENNIS LAWSON (@GR33NAZN)

PHOTOELIOT J. SCHECHTER/NHLI/GETTY IMAGES (COVER)FOR May 13, 2013
PHOTOWALTER IOOSS JR. FOR SPORTS ILLUSTRATED (JORDAN) PHOTOJOHN W. MCDONOUGH/SPORTS ILLUSTRATED (BRYANT) PHOTOTWITTER.COM (TWEET) PHOTO

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)