April 14, 2014
April 14, 2014

Table of Contents
April 14, 2014
  • After they were banned from the NCAA tournament a season ago, coach Kevin Ollie held the Huskies together by giving them a higher sense of purpose. Then he guided the No. 7 seed to upset after upset—and, with a steely win over Kentucky, to the school's second title in four years

  • The season may have just ended, but it's never too early to start thinking about which teams will be at the top of the polls next fall

  • The economic landscape is set for this season: The Dodgers sit atop the payroll heap, the Marlins at the bottom. But in an era of LONG CONTRACT EXTENSIONS (this spring everyone from Indians catcher Yan Gomes to Tigers superstar Miguel Cabrera got one) some teams have players signed through 2024. Here's a season-by-season look at each club's salary commitments over the next decade.

  • The seven-year, $215 million extension he signed in January didn't just make Clayton Kershaw the game's HIGHEST-PAID PITCHER—it also made him the ninth player the Dodgers must pay at least through 2017. The Giants and the Reds have L.A. beat on long-term commitments, though: They already have payroll obligations through '21 and '24, respectively.



Every time I read about power hitters or hear someone talk about being in awe of a 400-foot blast, I can't help but think of Indians slugger Vic Wertz being robbed by the New York Giants' Willie Mays on a 450-foot drive to centerfield during Game 1 of the 1954 World Series. Despite the out, that was true power.

This is an article from the April 14, 2014 issue

Michael Arnold, Maplewood, N.J.

Imported Goods

Although I enjoyed Tom Verducci's article on the lack of sluggers in baseball (The Power Gap), I disagree with his inclusion of Joe DiMaggio as one of the Yankees' homegrown hitters. Like Alfonso Soriano, whom Verducci excluded because he played pro ball in Japan before signing with the Yanks, DiMaggio played in the minors for the San Francisco Seals of the Pacific Coast League from 1932 through '36.

Peter B. Reilly, Branford, Conn.

Stuck on Empty

In your Modest Proposal blurb on the Rays (SCOUTING REPORTS) you imply that Tropicana Field is the reason attendance is low in Tampa. That couldn't be further from the truth. The NFL's Buccaneers ranked 29th in attendance in 2013, so it has more to do with the city than it does the actual venue. Besides, there are two things that drive attendance: tradition and winning. It's why Dodger Stadium, Fenway Park and Wrigley Field keep filling up the seats. The Rays have neither the tradition nor the fan base to keep attendance high, despite having a winning team.

Laurence Siegel, Manteno, Ill.

Commish for a Day

I enjoyed LaTroy Hawkins's essay on the changes he'd like to see in baseball (POINT AFTER), but I disagree with him on one key point. I don't think baseball needs affirmative action to get African-American kids involved in baseball. Gone are the days when there were rules that kept African-Americans from playing the game. The fact that any kid in America might choose to play football or basketball rather than baseball is called freedom of choice.

Donald Miller, Greensboro, N.C.

I have no clue if baseball is doing enough to attract more African-American players to the game. However, Hawkins's essay made me pause and wonder: If the NHL heeded Hawkins's suggestion and made every team spend money cultivating talent in the African-American community, would there really be more African-Americans playing hockey?

Albert F. Barry, Staten Island, N.Y.

Miguel Cabrera won back-to-back AL MVPs (2012 and 2013) and hit for the Triple Crown in '12, yet you call Mike Trout the best player in the game?

Tayler Leamon

Ann Arbor, Mich.




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Was signing DeSean Jackson a wise move for the Redskins?

Stephen M. Channell Three years, $24 million with $16 million guaranteed. I think it was a steal.

Jeff Brynan Sure. Another out of control ego to go with Dan Snyder is just what the Skins needed. Good Luck!

Tom Chapman No. They still don't have an offensive line or a defense, and I don't trust RG3 in the long run.


Texans running back Arian Foster's response to a fan's posting a photo of herself with someone she thought was him.

Lol I appreciate the love but that's not me. RT @j__baz: Ran into @ArianFoster at Pub Fiction last night! ...