Search

IOC-saw

April 14, 2014
April 14, 2014

Table of Contents
April 14, 2014

SI.com
THE MAIL
2014 NCAA CHAMPIONSHIP
  • After they were banned from the NCAA tournament a season ago, coach Kevin Ollie held the Huskies together by giving them a higher sense of purpose. Then he guided the No. 7 seed to upset after upset—and, with a steely win over Kentucky, to the school's second title in four years

  • The season may have just ended, but it's never too early to start thinking about which teams will be at the top of the polls next fall

PATRICK BEVERLEY
BASEBALL
  • The economic landscape is set for this season: The Dodgers sit atop the payroll heap, the Marlins at the bottom. But in an era of LONG CONTRACT EXTENSIONS (this spring everyone from Indians catcher Yan Gomes to Tigers superstar Miguel Cabrera got one) some teams have players signed through 2024. Here's a season-by-season look at each club's salary commitments over the next decade.

  • The seven-year, $215 million extension he signed in January didn't just make Clayton Kershaw the game's HIGHEST-PAID PITCHER—it also made him the ninth player the Dodgers must pay at least through 2017. The Giants and the Reds have L.A. beat on long-term commitments, though: They already have payroll obligations through '21 and '24, respectively.

POINT AFTER
Departments

IOC-saw

The Committee gave Nicklas Backstrom his silver medal, while Rick DeMont continues to go without his hardware

GOOD NEWS

This is an article from the April 14, 2014 issue Original Layout

Nicklas Backstrom

Games: Sochi '14

Medal:

Event: Ice hockey

Nearly three weeks after the men's hockey final in Sochi, Swedish center Nicklas Backstrom got his silver medal. The 26-year-old Capitals forward had been pulled from his pregame routine, hours before Sweden lost the gold medal game to Canada (3--0), because his urine sample showed elevated levels of pseudoephedrine (SI, March 3) triggered by the allergy medication Zyrtec-D. On March 14 the IOC decided Backstrom had not tried "to improve his performance by taking a prohibited substance," noting he had listed his medication on his doping control form and acted on the advice of his team doctor. The IOC maintained that the ban was "fully justified" but also found Backstrom was entitled to his medal.

STILL BAD NEWS

Rick DeMont

Games: Munich '72

Medal:

Event: 400-m freestyle

Former U.S. Olympic swimmer Rick DeMont is still without his gold medal—from 1972 (SI, Feb. 5, 2001). As a 16-year-old, DeMont won gold in Munich in the 400-meter freestyle, but he had his medal taken away after he tested positive for ephedrine, a banned substance that was in DeMont's asthma medication. He was also prohibited from competing in the 1,500 free, where he held the world record at the time. Like Backstrom, DeMont listed his medication on the appropriate form and followed the advice of team doctors. The USOC cleared and recognized DeMont in '01, but the IOC has yet to acknowledge his achievements, and he remains permanently disqualified after winning gold, which he calls "a tattoo I wear that I can't seem to get off."

PHOTOBRUCE BENNETT/GETTY IMAGES (BACKSTROM)PHOTOJERRY COOKE FOR SPORTS ILLUSTRATED (DEMONT)