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Channel Hopper

Sept. 29, 2014
Sept. 29, 2014

Table of Contents
Sept. 29, 2014

INBOX
BASEBALL
  • Derek Jeter might not be the most famous ballplayer ever, but he's certainly the most familiar. In a series of revealing interviews, the Yankees' shortstop reflects on how he survived being watched, photographed, praised and poked like no one else, and what has changed in the game (lots) and in himself (little) over two decades in the New York glare

  • Jeter is almost as famous for his ability to avoid controversy as for his on-field skill, and New York's reporters are still in awe

THE NFL FAN POLL
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
ERIK SPOELSTRA
  • PERVASIVE SELF-DOUBT NEARLY KEPT ERIK SPOELSTRA FROM THE NBA. BUT HE USED THAT FEAR OF FAILURE TO FUEL HIS RISE FROM "THE DUNGEON" TO THE TOP OF THE COACHING FIELD. POST-LEBRON HOPE IN MIAMI STARTS WITH THE AUTHOR OF THE TEAM'S CODE

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Channel Hopper

While her classmates were immersing themselves in a new school year earlier this month, Charlotte Samuels (FACES IN THE CROWD, Oct. 21, 2013), a junior at Ridgewood (N.J.) High, was diving into the English Channel off the coast of Dover. On Sept. 8 she became the youngest person—at 16 years, seven months and three days—to complete the Triple Crown of open-water swimming. (She navigated California's Catalina Channel in August and circled Manhattan in June.) During the 20 hours, 44 minutes and 47 seconds Charlotte was in the water, her spirits were buoyed by her boat crew, who scrawled Facebook messages from friends back home onto a whiteboard for her to see and cheered themselves hoarse when she had to sprint the last three miles to outdistance the current. "I felt like I could have kept swimming for another hour if I needed to," Charlotte said.

This is an article from the Sept. 29, 2014 issue Original Layout

PHOTOMARKO GEORGIEV/NORTHJERSEY.COM (SAMUELS)