Sign of Power

What the signatures of the last two NBA commissioners tells us about who they really are
October 27, 2014

WHEN ADAM SILVER took over for David Stern as NBA commissioner last February, the league changed its Spalding game balls to bear his signature. That was perhaps the most visible alteration anyone expected from Silver during his first several months on the job—until a certain owner caused Silver to force the sale of the Clippers (page 22). The authoritative decision earned the new commissioner plenty of publicity, not to mention credibility. What else can we expect from Silver, 52, as his first full season in command tips off? Noted handwriting expert Kathi McKnight examined the John Hancocks of both Silver and Stern to find out what the writing on the ball reveals about the personalities of the league's only commissioners since 1984.

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WHAT IT IS WHAT IT MEANS
1 The baseline is straight. He's a perfectionist.
2 Perfectly round, carefully placed dot on 'i'. Pays attention to detail and dislikes clutter.
3 Stem of 'd' is looped. He's hard on himself.
4 The 'e' is an open loop. He's broad-minded.
5 Cross of 't' comes from the 'n.' Has a guilt trip imposed by someone else.
6 No middle initial. Unconventional, outspoken.
7 'A' crossed to form a triangle. Persistent.
8 No frills or flourishes. Straightforward.
9 The 'l' is retraced. Hard-core realist.
10 Written quickly. Sharp-minded and analytical.

SIGN OF THE APOCALYPSE

Cowboys running back Joseph Randle, who was arrested last week for shoplifting cologne and underwear, has signed an endorsement deal with a competing brand of skivvies.

PHOTONATHANIEL S. BUTLER/NBAE/GETTY IMAGES (STERN BALL) PHOTONED DISHMAN/NBAE/GETTY IMAGES (SILVER BALL) PHOTORONALD MARTINEZ/GETTY IMAGES (RANDLE)

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)