When Walter Byers became the first executive director of the NCAA in 1951, he headed a five-person staff in his hometown of Kansas City, Mo. Over the next 36 years Byers, who died last week at 93 of a bloodstream infection, turned the association into one of the largest and most powerful organizations in sports, with a staff of 143 on a budget of $100 million when he retired in 1987. The man who first resisted Title IX later embraced women's athletics, helped invent the term student-athlete and raised the issue of player compensation before most others, urging lawmakers to enact an athletes' bill of rights. After he retired to raise cattle, his book, Unsportsmanlike Conduct: Exploiting College Athletes, blasted the commercialism he had helped to create.

PHOTORICH CLARKSON FOR SPORTS ILLUSTRATED (BYERS)

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)