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To an Athlete Dying Young

Aug. 24, 2015
Aug. 24, 2015

Table of Contents
Aug. 24, 2015

INBOX
JOHN URSCHEL
BRIAN CASHMAN
  • Since being promoted at 30, the Yankees' GM has thrived for nearly two decades in the cauldron of the Bronx. Whether or not he earns a fifth ring this fall, he's already one of the most iconic—and most fearless—figures in franchise history

  • BY SHUNNING BIG TRADES THAT WOULD COST TOP PROSPECTS, CASHMAN HOPES TO GET BACK TO WHERE HE STARTED

POINT AFTER
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To an Athlete Dying Young

JOE ROTH was the quintessential golden boy, a quarterback with blond curls and a dazzling smile whose Cal Bears led the nation in total offense in 1975. A little over a year later he was dead, from melanoma, at age 21. Don't Quit: The Joe Roth Story is a chronicle of Roth's short but shimmering life, a Brian's Song for the 30 for 30 generation. The film features beautiful, washed-out archival footage that Instagram filters can only hope to replicate, and interviews with Roth's family, teammates, coaches and opponents, including Tony Dungy and Dick Vermeil. In November of his senior year, Roth was given 90 days to live, but he participated in postseason all-star games while undergoing chemo, never betraying his condition to teammates. "He wanted to be an ordinary Joe," his mother, Lena, says. "But he was different."

This is an article from the Aug. 24, 2015 issue

PHOTOCOURTESY BLOOD & CHOCOLATE (DON'T QUIT)