Bulk doesn't necessarily mean brawn. Big muscles can be weak for their size, and San Francisco--based startup Skulpt knows that. The company builds cellphone-sized devices that use electrical impedance to measure the ratio of fat to muscle fiber and determine muscle quality. According to cofounder Seward Rutkove, Skulpt's MQ rating corresponds to "the force generation of a muscle divided by its cross-sectional area."

And Rutkove knows muscles. He heads the Division of Neuromuscular Disease at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston and researches illnesses including ALS, muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy. In early November, Skulpt (skulpt.me) launched a fund-raising campaign for a new version—Chisel—on Indiegogo and hit its $100,000 target within two weeks, which will allow the company to flex some financial muscle too.

PHOTOCOURTESY OF SKULPT

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)