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SI NOW

July 27, 2015
July 27, 2015

Table of Contents
July 27, 2015

SI NOW
INBOX
BRITISH OPEN
  • JORDAN SPIETH FELL JUST SHORT IN HIS BID TO WIN A THIRD STRAIGHT MAJOR, AS HARSH WEATHER AT ST. ANDREWS, A DENSE PACK OF CONTENDERS AND A MONDAY FINISH CREATED THE PERFECT CRUCIBLE FOR ANOTHER GOLFER ALSO WITH THE GRIT OF HOGAN

BASEBALL
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
BASKETBALL
  • THE FORMER KENTUCKY AND NBA STAR HAS STRUGGLED WITH AN ADDICTION TO PAINKILLERS SINCE HIS PLAYING CAREER WOUND DOWN 15 YEARS AGO. AFTER BEING ARRESTED FOR THEFT AND TRAFFICKING IN STOLEN PROPERTY, HE'S TRYING TO REBUILD HIS LIFE

Darrelle Revis
  • Now that he's ditched the Super Bowl--winning Patriots for a homecoming (and a lot of cash) in New York, Darrelle Revis wants to make a few things clear. No, it's not all about the money. But it's not entirely about rings either. It's about winning the negotiation ... and, the Jets hope, following in Joe Namath's footsteps

POINT AFTER

SI NOW

By WITH HOST Maggie Gray

SPENCER HAYWOOD

This is an article from the July 27, 2015 issue

The ABA and NBA veteran recounts his days in both leagues and his successful antitrust lawsuit against the NBA, allowing underclassmen to be eligible for the draft.

MAGGIE GRAY: When you were battling in court for the right to [leave college and] turn pro, did you think it would take the shape that it has?

SPENCER HAYWOOD: The ABA allowed me to play that first year [after I left the University of Detroit at the end of my sophomore year], making an exemption, and then all of the players started coming out. Julius Erving, George Gervin, Moses Malone, all of those guys were coming into the ABA, not the NBA. Sam Schuman, the owner of the Seattle SuperSonics, said, "Well, if we don't fight for these guys to play, we are going to lose this case." And so the fight just went on and on. It was sold to the public that [leaving college early] would be the downfall of college basketball. It would be the downfall of professional basketball because you would have a lot of unskilled players coming in, you would have an influx of black athletes coming in. So there was just a lot of stuff going on. That fight took a complete year. [After I joined the Sonics in 1970] I was thrown out of several arenas. When I would walk on the floor, they would make an announcement: "Ladies and gentlemen, we have an illegal player on the floor, number 24, and he must be escorted off the grounds."

MG: That's so dramatic. I can't imagine what that would be like.

SH: It was horrible. I was 20 years old. One night we played the Bulls, and their whole team walked off the floor because their owners didn't want me to set sight on their players.

For more of Haywood's interview, plus the SI Now archive, go to SI.com/sinow

"One night we played the Bulls, and their whole team walked off the floor."
—Spencer Haywood

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PHOTORICHARD SHEINWALD/AP (HAYWOOD)PHOTOSTEVE BARDENS/FIFA/GETTY IMAGES (TEAM)PHOTOMATT YORK/AP (PERALTA)PHOTOANDY LYONS/GETTY IMAGES (DALTON)PHOTOCHRIS CARLSON/AP (KERSHAW)PHOTO