Point Of Fact
POINT OF FACT
A National Football League quiz to excite the memory and increase the knowledge of fans and armchair experts
Fast Man With A Fact
Gentlemen's Sport
A SPORT FOR GENTLEMEN
At Washington and Lee University, deep in the heart of the Confederacy, football is a winning game even though it is played purely for fun
18 FOOTBALL DEATHS: IS IT THE HELMET?
In the first six weeks of the 1961 season more high school and college boys were killed than in all of 1960. Three-fourths of the deaths were from injuries to the 'protected' head and neck areas
THE MYSTERY OF THE WALLEYES AND THE WATER
Its solution may well make history. Along the north branch of the Susquehanna River, conservationists and industrialists are meeting head on to determine who should make restitution when a stream flows poison
Hockey Preview
Old Designs
NEW FUN WITH OLD DESIGNS
With cheerful scorn for $1,000 winches and the unfathomable fractions of ocean-racing rules, a growing number of sailors are beginning to have new fun with old designs
Football's Week
Horse Racing
Sporting Look
Gloves to improve your game
Hands that froze, chafed and bled will be safe from harm, and sportsmen will better their performance as stretch and leather combine in sporting handwear
Pro Football
Soaring
A Silence in the Sky
In 1956 there were 600 sailplane pilots in the U.S., or about one for every 5,000 buzzards, an arrangement endorsed by both the Audubon Society and society in general. The sport of soaring was judged expensive and dangerous. Airport Operators conspired to keep gliders from cluttering up their traffic patterns, and small boys with air rifles considered them better targets than the neighbors' cats. In "Government by the People" Burns and Peltason included the Soaring Society of America among oddball organizations, along with the American Sunbathers' Association and the Blizzard Men of 1888.
For The Record
Acknowledgments
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back
Departments