TV Talking Heads Benefit from Aaron Rodgers’ Minicamp Absence

Television commentators and podcast hosts are making a big deal out of the fact that it’s not a big deal
New York Jets QB Aaron Rodgers in the Turf Club during the Kentucky Derby in Louisville, Ky., on May. 4 2024.
New York Jets QB Aaron Rodgers in the Turf Club during the Kentucky Derby in Louisville, Ky., on May. 4 2024. / Sam Upshaw Jr./Courier Journal / USA

You’ve got to love the TV sports commentators. Regarding the absence of former Cal star Aaron Rodgers from the Jets’ mandatory two-day minicamp, they made a big deal out of the fact that they think it’s not a big deal.

Such is the social media world in which we live when it comes to the status of Rodgers, a 40-year-old, four-time MVP whose controversial beliefs and acts have made him a polarizing figure. Every move he makes and every word he utters are analyzed to death for viewer consumption. 

He is the house fire that pedestrians want to stop and watch burn. But in this case, most TV and podcast commentators are saying, in essence, “Move along, nothing to see here.”

In fact the guilty party is seen as Jets head coach Robert Saleh, who used the word “unexcused” to describe Rodgers’ absence, immediately getting the media fired up to take a stance without knowing the reason for Rodgers' absence.  As a result many commentators are saying Saleh made the issue a big deal when he could have swept it under the rug with a few less inflammatory words.

Let’s take a look at what TV and commentators said about Rodgers’ absence:

This absence will all be forgotten if Rodgers has solid performances in the Jets' first few regular-season games. If he struggles early on, we will be reminded of the "unexcused" absences from mandatory minicamp.


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Jake Curtis

JAKE CURTIS

Jake Curtis worked in the San Francisco Chronicle sports department for 27 years, covering virtually every sport, including numerous Final Fours, several college football national championship games, an NBA Finals, world championship boxing matches and a World Cup. He was a Cal beat writer for many of those years, and won awards for his feature stories.