500,000 Expensive Reasons to Stop the Ticket Tax

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Proposed tax would have cost MSU, U of M, and Tigers fans more than $500,000

this weekend.

 

 

 

LANSING, MI – The six percent ticket tax, currently being proposed by the Governor and

some Michigan lawmakers, would have taken a big bite out of the pocketbooks of collegiate

and professional sports fans had it passed earlier this week. The ticket tax would have cost

Detroit Tigers, Michigan State Spartans, and Michigan Wolverines more than $500,000 this

weekend alone — and almost $100 million for the year.

 

More than 157,000 sports fans will flock to Comerica Park and Spartan Stadium this

weekend with hopes of seeing the Tigers clinch the American League Central title and instate

rivals Michigan State and Michigan battle it out on the gridiron.

 

Fans attending the three game series at Comerica would have paid more than $185,000.

Fans headed to East Lansing on Saturday would have paid $315,000. The proposed tax

would have cost UM season football ticket-holders approximately $320,000 per home game

for a season total of more than $2.5 million.

 

In a recent survey conducted by Lansing research firm Marketing Resource Group, 40

percent of Michigan voters said if the ticket tax were passed, they would purchase fewer

tickets to professional and college sporting events, concerts, and live shows in Michigan.

“The hard economic times in Michigan have made it tough for families to scrape together

money to attend sporting and entertainment events,” said Marketing Resource Group MRG

president Tom Shields. “Putting a $100 million tax burden and the backs of fans will only

make it more difficult for families to afford tickets to their favorite sporting and entertainment

events.”

 

“But is doesn’t end there. With fewer people going out, the pain gets felt by the venue

operators, and other businesses such as bars, restaurants and their employees who

provide services to the millions of patrons attending games and concert venues in

Michigan.”

 

The statewide poll was conducted between September 12 and 20 among a random

sampling of 600 likely Michigan voters, with a statistical margin of error of plus or minus 4.1

percent within a 95 percent degree of confidence. The Marketing Resource Group MRG

Michigan Poll is conducted twice yearly to measure the public perception on a wide range

of diverse issues. MRG has conducted the poll more than 25 years.

For more information and new developments regarding the ticket tax, visit www.NoTicketTax.com.

 

  

 

 

 

 

Voters were asked:    

 

If this ticket tax passed, do you think you will purchase more tickets, fewer tickets or the

same number of tickets to professional and collegiate sporting events, concerts and live

shows in Michigan?

More……………………………………………………….. 1%

Same……………………………………………………… 53%

 

 

 

 

Don’t Know……………………………………………….. 4% 

 

 

 

 

Fewer……………………………………………………… 40%