Rangers' PA Man Chuck Morgan Set to Announce His 3,000th Consecutive Game

Chris Halicke

ARLINGTON, Texas — If there's ever a saying that is synonymous with Texas Rangers baseball, it's announced prior to every Rangers game in Arlington by public-address announcer Chuck Morgan:

"It's baseball time in Texas!"

Outside of one season in Kansas City in 2002, Morgan's voice has echoed through the home of the Rangers since April 4, 1983, when he left the Grand Ole Opry to become the their public-address announcer. Now, Morgan will hit a huge milestone on Saturday night as he works his 3,000th consecutive game behind the mic in Arlington—something he never imagined would come to fruition when he first started on Opening Night in 1983 at Arlington Stadium.

"I didn’t even think about things like that," Morgan said. "I had made every game in Nashville. I never missed at the Grand Ole Opry. I’ve been very lucky in my life that I never would have thought I would have worked 3,000 consecutive games."

Morgan's longevity is not only a testament to his love for the game of baseball and the Texas Rangers, but also to the human immune system. Going 3,000 consecutive games without calling in sick is an accomplishment in and of itself.

“I've not had very many games or have had to fight through it," Morgan said. "My parents were pretty much the same way. My dad got up and went to work every day and sold meat on a route. And he didn't miss very many days. For me, it's not where I'm having to work 30 or 40 consecutive days in a row. The team leaves town. On the weekends, when the team's out of town, I'm at home. I guess I reserve those times to get sick. ... I had to real close calls for games. But other than that, I've been very lucky.”

Morgan does so much more for the Rangers than announce players as the come to bat. His official title with the ballclub is the executive vice president of ballpark entertainment, promotions, and production. Just a couple highlights of his job include editing video that is shown on the scoreboard night in and night out and the infamous Dot Race.

However, if Morgan could select his own title, it would be much simpler.

"Man of the fans," Morgan said with a smile. "My hope is a fan comes out here, enjoys a baseball game, and leaves here, not ever knowing that I was in the ballpark or I had anything to do or take away from anything on the field that they had a great time."

The only thing missing from celebrating this milestone with Morgan is the people he loves interacting with the most: the fans. Current regulations set by Major League Baseball during the COVID-19 pandemic haven't afforded Rangers fans the opportunity to hear Morgan's voice echo through Globe Life Field, the brand new $1.2 billion home of the Rangers.

"It’s just the hand that we’ve been dealt," Morgan said. "It would really be much better for me if we had 40,000 people in the ballpark. But I understand, and I accept it. I don’t like it, but I accept it."

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