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Already down Alex Caruso, who hasn't played since Dec. 20 due to a foot sprain and health and safety protocols, which he is currently in, the Chicago Bulls will also be without Zach LaVine for Saturday's game against the Boston Celtics.

LaVine injured his left knee in Friday's matchup between the Bulls and the Golden State Warriors. Fortunately, the MRI he underwent on Saturday revealed no structural damage. The expectation is the All-Star wing will not miss significant time.

The Bulls also may be without Lonzo Ball, who is questionable for Saturday's matchup in Boston due to a knee injury.

The Bulls are 7-3 in their last ten games and sit atop the Eastern Conference. Initially, like Friday's matchup against the Philadelphia 76ers, Saturday's game was viewed as a barometer for the Celtics' ability to compete with the top teams in the East. But with key players on Chicago absent, Boston should protect its home court.

The Celtics will be without Marcus Smart, who's in health and safety protocols and hasn't played since sustaining a right thigh contusion in Monday's game against the Indiana Pacers. His absence doesn't help Boston's cause, and the Celtics require a shakeup in more ways than one, win or lose. But Friday's poor showing in Philadelphia should serve as a source of motivation for the Celtics to play up to their capabilities on Saturday.

Update: Lonzo Ball has been downgraded to out. That means the Bulls only have ten players available for Saturday's matchup, their fifth game in seven days.

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