Stephon Marbury II Commits to Cal Basketball as a Walk-On

Marbury's father was a basketball star in high school, college, the NBA and China, and is the subject of a Netflix documentary
Stephon Marbury II
Stephon Marbury II /

It’s always intriguing when the son of a famous athlete does something newsworthy.  It also makes a lot of us feel old.

On Wednesday, Stephon Marbury II, the son of standout basketball player Stephon Marbury, announced on Instagram that he has committed to Cal for this coming season as a preferred walk-on.

His post included this message:

“My basketball journey and the Marbury Legacy continues. I’m blessed and grateful to announce that I will be a PWO at the University of Cal Berkeley!”

Marbury II is a 6-foot-3 guard who attended DME Academy this year. He is not ranked on reputable recruiting sites such as 247Sports or Rivals, but videos indicate he has some quickness and is a good ball-handler.

He apparently got his ball-handling skills under the tutelage of his father.

Marbury II commits to Cal and head coach Mark Madsen as the Bears enter the Atlantic Coast Conference in the 2024-25 season.  Cal went 13-19 this past season after going 2-29 the previous season under Mark Fox.

His father, Stephon Marbury Sr., was a high school sensation and a star at Georgia Tech for one year before being the fourth overall pick in the 1996 NBA draft. He spent 13 years in the NBA, was a two-time all-star and averaged more than 20 points in seven of his seasons.

Marbury then played nine more seasons in China, where he was an absolute star. He played his final game in China in February 2018. He later became a successful head coach in China.

He was the subject of a Netflix documentary, “A Kid from Coney Island.”


Published
Jake Curtis

JAKE CURTIS

Jake Curtis worked in the San Francisco Chronicle sports department for 27 years, covering virtually every sport, including numerous Final Fours, several college football national championship games, an NBA Finals, world championship boxing matches and a World Cup. He was a Cal beat writer for many of those years, and won awards for his feature stories.