Joanne P. McCallie Selected To Coach 2006 FIBA Americas

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Joanne P. McCallie Selected To Coach 2006 FIBA Americas

U.S. Under-20 Championship Women’s Team

California’s Joanne Boyle and Furman’s Sam Dixon to assist.

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. -- Michigan State women’s basketball head coach Joanne P. McCallie has been selected to lead USA Basketball’s 2006 FIBA Americas under-20 championship women’s team. She will be assisted by the University of California’s Joanne Boyle and Furman University’s Sam Dixon. The coaching staff selections were made by the USA Basketball Women’s Collegiate Committee, which is chaired by Sue Donohue, the NCAA’s vice president of Division I women’s basketball."This is such a tremendous honor to represent myself, my family, Michigan State University and most importantly, my country," said McCallie, who just completed her sixth season at MSU. "It’s exciting and will add another dimension to my professional career, and it’s a great growth opportunity. I’m very honored that USA Basketball chose me to represent the Red, White and Blue during international competition."I feel great support from my staff, the university, and my family," McCallie continued. "It will definitely be a family affair. They will be traveling with me and it will be an excellent learning experience for everyone. It’s going to be a challenge, but I’m excited to learn about USA Basketball and see how the operation works. I’m thrilled and can’t wait to get started working with Coach Boyle, Coach Dixon and the athletes."The FIBA Americas U20 Championship for Women will feature eight national teams from North, South and Central Americas and the Caribbean. The top three finishing teams qualify for the 2007 FIBA U21 Women’s World Championship that will be held July 27-Aug. 5 in Guatemala City, Guatemala.The eight participating teams will be divided into two preliminary round groups of four teams each. After playing each of the other three teams in its preliminary round group between Aug. 9-11, the top two finishing teams from each preliminary round group will advance to play in the Aug. 10 medal round semifinals, while the third and fourth place finishing teams in preliminary round play will meet in the consolation round semifinals that day. The gold medal, bronze medal, fifth/sixth place and seventh/eighth place games will be played on Aug. 13. The site for the tournament and the training camp are still to be determined. Trials are scheduled for May 18-21 at the United States Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, Colo.2006 USA Basketball Women’s FIBA Americas U20 Coaching StaffHead Coach: Joanne P. McCallie, Michigan StateAssistant Coach: Joanne Boyle, CaliforniaAssistant Coach: Sam Dixon, FurmanJoanne P. McCallie - Head Coach, Michigan StateMcCallie, who is entering her seventh year as MSU’s head coach, continues to shape Spartan basketball into one of the nation’s elite programs. McCallie’s six-year record at MSU stands at 125-66 (.654), and she currently has a career record of 292-139 (.677) in 14 seasons as a head coach. The past two seasons, she has led MSU to an impressive 57-14 (.803) record.In 2005-06, she led the Spartans to their third straight 20-win campaign - a program first - with a 24-10 overall record. MSU finished in a tie for third in the Big Ten standings at 11-5, McCallie’s second-best league finish at MSU, and advanced to the semifinals of the Big Ten Tournament for the third consecutive year. The 24 victories in 2005-06 were the second most in a singleseason in school history. All of this was done while playing arguably the toughest schedule in school history, as MSU matched up against 11 NCAA Tournament teams and six teams ranked in the top 10. The Spartans posted victories over No. 16 Oklahoma and No. 8 Rutgers, who went on to be No. 2 and No. 3 seeds, respectively, in the NCAA Tournament. The Spartans were ranked in the top 20 all season, peaking at No. 9.March is when it matters most, and McCallie guided MSU to its school-record fourth straight appearance in the NCAA Tournament and second straight berth in the Sweet 16 in 2005-06. The Spartans, a No. 4 seed, defeated 13th-seeded Wisconsin-Milwaukee in the first round and fifth-seeded Kentucky in the second round to earn a spot in the Bridgeport Regional. McCallie is 8-4 in NCAA Tournament games at MSU, including a 7-2 record the past two years.After guiding MSU to back-to-back NCAA Tournaments and upper-division Big Ten finishes in the previous two seasons, McCallie led Michigan State to its greatest season ever in 2004-05. Michigan State advanced to its first National Championship game, won a school-record 33 games (10 more than theprevious record), won a school-record 14 Big Ten games while sharing just its second Big Ten regular-season championship, won its first Big Ten Tournament title, finished 13-0 at home, had a school-record 17-game winning streak, and beat 13 nationally-ranked teams, including four teams ranked No. 1, No. 2 or No. 3 in the nation.For her efforts, McCallie was named National Coach of the Year by the Associated Press, Basketball Times, and Nike, as well as being voted Big Ten Coach of the Year by the league’s media. It marked the first time an MSU women’s basketball coach has been named national coach of the year and the second time a Spartan head coach earned the conference’s coach of the year award. McCallie was also named the 2005 Basketball Coaches Association of Michigan College Coach of the Year.In 2003-04, McCallie guided MSU to its first 20-win season since 1996-97 and just the fifth in school history. The Spartans, who finished 22-9 overall, advanced to the second round of the NCAA Tournament after a 72-60 win over Arizona in the opening round. MSU won 10 road games and six conference road games for the first time in school history, while also being nationally ranked for the first time since the 1996-97 season. The Spartans climbed as high as 15th in the ESPN/USA Today coaches poll, marking MSU’s highest-ever national ranking at the time. The 22 wins tied for the second most in a single season for MSU in school history. During the 2002-03 season, McCallie guided a depleted MSU squad to a 17-12 overall record and its first NCAA Tournament appearance since 1997, as the Spartans earned a No. 8 seed in the East Regional. Despite numerous injuries that left MSU with a core of just six players getting nearly all of the minutes, she led Michigan State to its best Big Ten finish since 1997, as MSU tied for fourth in the league with a 10-6 record. The Spartans improved by four wins over the previous season’s Big Ten win total - more than any other team in the conference. Michigan State closed the 2001-02 season with a 19-13 record, and advanced to the semifinals of the Women’s National Invitation Tournament for the first time in school history. The 2001-02 season saw MSU increase its win total from the previous season by nine victories, and included wins against three nationally-ranked opponents. MSU finished the 2000-01 season, McCallie’s first in East Lansing, with a 10-18 overall mark. However, the Spartans struggled with injuries all year, losing senior forward Becky Cummings (foot) and freshman guard Candice Jackson (knee) during the season. McCallie, who was named to the position on March 27, 2000, became just the fourth head coach in Michigan State women’s basketball history. She replaced Karen Langeland, who retired following 24 years as the head coach at MSU. McCallie arrived at MSU after spending eight years as the head coach at the University of Maine. During her tenure with the Black Bears, McCallie guided Maine to a record of 167-73, six-straight NCAA Tournament appearances, two North Atlantic Conference Tournament Championships, two America East Conference Tournament Championships and five regular-season conference titles. A native of Brunswick, Maine, McCallie guided the Black Bears to seven-straight 20-win campaigns, including a 20-11 overall record in 1999-2000 and their sixth-straight NCAA Tournament appearance. She was named conference coach of the year three times, twice in the North Atlantic Conference (1995 and 1996) and once in the America East (1999).  Prior to taking her first head coaching position, McCallie was an assistant coach at Auburn from 1988-92. As the team’s primary recruiter, she helped sign the fourth-ranked class in the nation in 1990-91 and the 16th-ranked class in 1991-92. While at Auburn, McCallie and the Tigers appeared in two national championship games and made an appearance in the NCAA Elite Eight.(THE FOLLOWING IS COURTESY OF USA BASKETBALL)Joanne Boyle - Head Coach, CaliforniaEarning her first USA Basketball coaching assignment, Boyle has collected 13 years of coaching experience in the United States–four of those as a head coach–and a overall record of 310-162 (.657 winning percentage)."Obviously to coach at that level, and to be an assistant under coach McCallie with coach Dixon, it’s just an honor," Boyle said. "I’m looking forward to getting out there with the kids and Joanne and Sam and coaching some great basketball."In her first year as the head coach at Cal, a program that previously had posted 12 consecutive losing seasons, Boyle finished the 2005-06 season 18-12, advancing to the school’s first NCAA Tournament since 1993. Boyle began her duties with the Bears by securing the Blue Star Index’s 12th-ranked recruiting class for the 2005-06 season.Prior to Cal, Boyle was the head coach at the University of Richmond (Va.) (2002-03 through 2004-05), inheriting a 14-16 program that hadn’t played in the postseason since 1991. In her three years there, she recorded three 20-win seasons and the school’s first NCAA Tournament appearance in 14 years. While at Richmond she was 67-29 (.698 winning percentage).In 2005, Boyle’s Spiders ranked in the top five in the Atlantic 10 Conference in 13 categories and received the school’s first at-large bid to the NCAA Tournament. She reached the WNIT quarterfinals in 2003 and the WNIT semifinals in 2004.Two seasons into her nine-year stint as an assistant coach at Duke (1993-94 through 2001-02), Boyle helped the 22-9 Blue Devils advance to the second round of the NCAA Tournament, the school’s first 20-win season in 10 years. The Blue Devils were 225-121 (.650 winning percentage) while Boyle was at Duke, appearing in eight consecutive NCAA Tournaments including two Sweet Sixteens (2000 and 2001), an Elite Eight (1998), a Final Four (2002) and an appearance in the national championship game (1999). Sam Dixon - Head Coach, FurmanDixon has an overall record of 365-314 (.538 winning percentage) after 24 years coaching basketball (1979-80 to present), holding coaching positions at nine colleges."I’m really proud and humbled to represent our country," Dixon said. "It’s a great honor and one taken with the highest regard. I’m excited about the opportunity to coach some of the finest under-20 basketball players in the country and to get the opportunity to work with two outstanding coaches in Joanne McCallie and Joanne Boyle."As the eighth head coach in the program’s 34-year history, Dixon reached 30, 40 and 50 wins faster than any women’s basketball coach in Furman history. After four years at Furman (2002-03 to present), Dixon is 62-54 (.534 winning percentage), posting just one losing season. Under Dixon a total of 22 players have earned Southern Conference Academic Honor Roll selections.In three seasons (1999-00 through 2001-02) as an assistant at Clemson University (S.C.), Clemson made three appearances in the NCAA Tournament, reaching the second round twice (2001 and 2000). He left the school with a 57-34 record (.626 winning percentage), posting a 21-10 finish in 2001. In one season as an assistant at the University of Arizona in 1998-99, Dixon helped the Wildcats secure the program’s first win over a nationally ranked opponent. Arizona finished 18-11, won the Pacific-10 Conference title and advanced to the second round of NCAA Tournament.Before moving from men’s to women’s college basketball, Dixon spent the 1997-98 season as the head men’s basketball coach at Harrison High School in Kennesaw, Georgia.Dixon also was a head or assistant men’s basketball coach at six other colleges. Dixon spent four seasons (1991-92 through 1994-95) as an assistant at Northern Illinois University, four seasons (1987-88 through 1990-91) as the head coach at Denison University (Ohio), two seasons (1985-86 and 1986-87) as an assistant at Davidson University (N.C.), one season (1984-85) as an assistant with Kent State University (Ohio), four seasons at Northern Kentucky University (1980-80 through 1983-84) and one season (1979-80) as a graduate assistant at Eastern Michigan University.Dixon was a four-year letterwinner at the College of Wooster (Ohio). He helped the team reach the NCAA South Regional Finals in 1976. The team’s most valuable player in 1979, Dixon was an All-Ohio Athletic Conference first team selection. In addition, he was an All-Great Lakes selection and an All-America third team selection. In 1989, he was inducted in the Wooster College Hall of Fame.2006 FIBA Americas U20 ChampionshipOriginally known as the FIBA Americas World Championship For Young Women Qualifying Tournament, the event was first held four years ago in 2002 as the U.S. earned the gold medal to qualify for the 2003 FIBA World Championship For Young Women. FIBA recently made the name change to reflect the age of eligible athletes (U20 for the qualifier and U21 for the World Championship). The USA not only captured the gold at the inaugural event in 2002, held in Ribeirao Preto, Brazil, it swept all four games and outscored the competition a whopping 102.8 points per game to 52.5 ppg. Brazil finished with the silver and Argentina claimed the bronze as all three teams qualified for the 2003 U21 Worlds.Courtesy of MSU SID.