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Buddy Boeheim: Apple Farmer

The Syracuse basketball guard has another NIL commercial, and it is hysterical.

Syracuse basketball guard Buddy Boeheim posted a video on his Instagram page on Friday. That is not normally a noteworthy event. However, this video is a commercial for Beek and Skiff Apple Orchards, where he pretends to be pursuing his dream of being an apple farmer. And it does not go well. You can watch the video embedded below. 

Buddy Boeheim has been quite active with NIL opportunities, even making history in some instances. Boeheim endorsed Three Wishes Cereal, which is described as a high protein, low sugar, grain free cereal option. The cereal even has a limited edition Buddy Box as part of the promotion. It is the first traditional ad campaign featuring a college athlete, according to Business of College Sports

Buddy was also the first athlete to sell his own merchandise with the school trademarked logo. Buddy partnered with The Players' Trunk to create "Buddy Buckets" apparel. Joe Girard announced the same later in the day, and now you can purchase JG3 gear from the company. Both are also on Cameo, where fans can pay for a video shoutout from those players as well as Jimmy Boeheim.

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Buddy also announced a partnership with ISlide back in July, a company that makes customizable slide sandals and other apparel. There you can purchase Buddy Buckets slide sandals or socks. He even has a special promo code BB35 to get 10% off your purchase.

This is just the latest example of Syracuse athletes taking advantage of NIL opportunities. Buddy has been one of the more active Orange athletes to do so, no doubt taking advantage of his national popularity stemming from a tremendous NCAA Tournament run last season.

Josh Black, a defensive lineman on the Syracuse football team, announced a partnership with WolfPak Clothing. You can use code "JoshBlack" to get 30% off any order. Wide receiver Taj Harris released merchandise with his name and picture. 

The ability for student-athletes to profit off of their Name, Image and Likeness went into effect on July 1st.