The National League Sets a Record For Futility That Hasn't Been Seen in Nearly 50 Years

The National League is struggling in a way that hasn't happened in nearly 50 years of baseball history.
Cincinnati Reds second baseman Jonathan India (6) takes the field as he’s introduced before the first inning of the MLB National League Opening Day game between the Cincinnati Reds and the Washington Nationals at Great American Ball Park in downtown Cincinnati on March 28.
Cincinnati Reds second baseman Jonathan India (6) takes the field as he’s introduced before the first inning of the MLB National League Opening Day game between the Cincinnati Reds and the Washington Nationals at Great American Ball Park in downtown Cincinnati on March 28. / Sam Greene/The Enquirer / USA TODAY

The National League has accomplished something that hasn't been done in nearly the last 50 years of baseball history, and that's not a good thing.

Per @OptaSTATS on social media:

There are 15 teams in the National League. Of those 15, 11 are currently below .500 (73.3%).

That's the highest percentage of a league's teams having a losing record at the end of any single day since July 26, 1976, when 9 of the AL's 12 teams were below .500 (75.0%).

Looking back even further, this hasn't been done in the National League since July 28, 1958!

Current records in the National League entering play on Friday:

Philadelphia Phillies, 44-19

Los Angeles Dodgers, 39-25

Milwaukee Brewers, 36-26

Atlanta Braves, 35-25

Chicago Cubs, 31-32

San Diego Padres, 32-34

Arizona Diamondbacks, 30-33

Cincinnati Reds, 30-33

San Francisco Giants, 30-33

St. Louis Cardinals, 29-32

Pittsburgh Pirates, 29-33

New York Mets, 27-35

Washington Nationals, 27-35

Colorado Rockies, 22-40

Miami Marlins, 21-41

What's even more surprising is how much the National League teams have invested in themselves recently - and that it's not working.

The Reds went out and spent money this past offseason on Frankie Montas, Jeimer Candelario, Emilio Pagan and others. The Diamondbacks added Eugenio Suarez in a trade, re-signed Lourdes Gurriel Jr. and brought in Jordan Montgomery. The Giants added Jordan Hicks, Jung Hoo Lee, Matt Chapman and Jorge Soler, and the list goes on and on.

At some point, some of these teams will figure it out, but for now, it's a rough look for the NL as a whole. In the American League, seven teams are over .500, with two right at .500.

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Brady Farkas

BRADY FARKAS

Brady Farkas is a baseball writer for Fastball on Sports Illustrated/FanNation and the host of 'The Payoff Pitch' podcast which can be found on Apple Podcasts and Spotify. Videos on baseball also posted to YouTube. Brady has spent nearly a decade in sports talk radio and is a graduate of Oswego State University. You can follow him on Twitter @WDEVRadioBrady.