Friday's Sports In Brief

GOLF

BEDMINSTER, N.J. (AP) Some of the best golfers in the world are competing in New Jersey this weekend - and vying for attention with a guy whose best finish was an age-group club title.

That would be President Donald Trump.

The president's arrival at his club created such a commotion that crowds at the U.S. Women's Open were asked to keep it down as golfers Lexi Thompson, Brooke Henderson and Stacy Lewis approached the 15th green.

Trump, fresh off a quick trip to France, turned up in a glassed-off patio of the clubhouse with son Eric by his side.

Acknowledging the crowds, the president waved, pointed and gave a thumbs-up, prompting squeals from a group of schoolgirls. Dozens of people swarmed around the clubhouse snapping photos and waving as the president occasionally approached the window.

BEDMINSTER, N.J. (AP) - Michelle Wie withdrew from the U.S. Women's Open because of a neck problem.

She played the final five holes of Thursday first round in pain and withdrew on the second hole of her second round the next day.

Wie said she sprained her neck two weeks ago before the final round of the KPMG Women's PGA. She finished the tournament but did not hit balls in the weeks leading to the Open at Trump National.

There was no indication of any problem in the first round Thursday until Wie returned to the course after a more than two-hour weather delay.

BASEBALL

BOSTON (AP) - Panda-mania is over in Boston before it ever really began.

The Red Sox designated third baseman Pablo Sandoval for assignment, cutting their losses on the $95 million free agent who was never productive or healthy enough to replicate the popularity - or World Series success - he had in San Francisco.

The Red Sox have seven days to trade or release the 30-year-old Sandoval, who was activated from the disabled list (inner ear infection) and returned from an injury rehab assignment with Triple-A Pawtucket. Unless they can find a taker for part of his salary, they will have paid $95 million for a total of 161 games, 575 at-bats, 136 hits and 14 homers - and not a single one of them in the postseason.

ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) - Mike Trout never got comfortable away from the action while he sat out 39 games with an injured thumb.

The two-time AL MVP is grateful to be back in the middle of it with the Los Angeles Angels.

Trout returned to the Angels' lineup on Friday, going 1 for 5 with a third-inning single when Los Angeles came back from the All-Star break to face Tampa Bay. He even stole second base, sliding in headfirst with no apparent worries about the action that caused his injury back on May 28.

Trout got the first significant injury of his baseball life when he tore a ligament in his left thumb with that headfirst slide in Miami. He had surgery before pursuing a steady recovery, which culminated in a rehab stint last week in Class A ball.

PRO FOOTBALL

EDEN PRAIRIE, Minn. (AP) - The NFL has suspended Minnesota Vikings wide receiver Michael Floyd without pay for the first four games of the regular season for violating its substance-abuse policy.

Floyd was arrested in Arizona in December after Scottsdale police found him unresponsive at the wheel of his vehicle while it was running at an intersection, reporting a blood alcohol level of 0.217 - more than 2 1/2 times legal limit in Arizona. He pleaded guilty in February to extreme drunken driving.

Last month, an Arizona judge ordered Floyd to serve one day in jail for failing alcohol tests while under house arrest for the drunken driving conviction. He blamed the results on a type of fermented tea called kombucha.

Floyd will be allowed to participate in all preseason practices and games. He can return to the active roster Oct. 2.

BOXING

LOS ANGELES (AP) - Mikaela Mayer is giving up her gold medal dreams to chase even bigger fighting rewards.

The U.S. Olympic boxer announced her decision to turn pro. Mayer has signed with promoter Top Rank, and she will make her debut Aug. 5 in downtown Los Angeles.

The San Fernando Valley native finished one victory shy of a medal at the Rio de Janeiro Olympics, losing a tight decision in the quarterfinals. Although the 27-year-old Mayer gained fame and respect from her strong amateur performances in recent years, she wanted more out of the sport that has consumed her life for the past decade.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) - Connecticut ethics lawyers say the University of Connecticut violated the state's ban on nepotism by hiring football coach Randy Edsall's son as an assistant coach, but say Corey Edsall can serve out his contract.

In a draft recommendation to the State Office Of Ethics enforcement board, the lawyers recommend no action be taken against UConn if Corey Edsall's one-year, $95,000 contract to coach the team's tight ends is not renewed.

The draft opinion recognizes the ''potential disruption'' to UConn's football program if the younger Edsall is barred from coaching this year.

It also notes that ''UConn and the Edsalls, based on UConn's differing interpretation of the Code of Ethics, in good faith entered into binding contracts and therefore have contractual obligations.''

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