SI.com Staff
Saturday September 3rd, 2016

In today’s game most players have solid, consistent backhands and explosive forehands. 2014 U.S. Open finalist Kei Nishikori is one of the few players who actually wins more with his backhand than his forehand. Here’s a look at some of the top players to see how they compare to Nishikori here through two rounds:

Nishikori’s balance of strength from the backcourt leaves his opponents difficult choices—do they try to attack his forehand or his backhand? His balanced strength of shot also allows Nishikori to play the court from more standard positions—not having to run around his backhand to hit aggressive forehands means that Nishikori doesn’t have to run as far as many of his opponents and keeps him more centered in the court.

Check SI.com's 2016 U.S. Open data hub page throughout the whole tournament for the latest data-driven infographics and charts from IBM, the official technology partner for the U.S. Open. IBM captures and analyzes the data that powers all of the Grand Slams, as well as the digital platforms that extend the experience to fans around the world.

 

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