Milwaukee Brewers manager Ron Roenicke before a spring training baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels Thursday, March 5, 2015, in Tempe, Ariz. (AP Photo/Morry Gash)
Morry Gash
March 19, 2015

PHOENIX (AP) Milwaukee manager Ron Roenicke's 2016 option was exercised Thursday by the Brewers.

Roenicke replaced Ken Macha after the 2010 season and has led the Brewers to a 335-313 record. Milwaukee won the NL Central in his first season, then finished third and dropped to fourth in 2013.

Milwaukee started 20-7 last season and led the division for five months, then lost 22 of its last 31 games and finished third at 82-80. The Brewers announced at the end of the season that Roenicke would return for 2015.

''It makes me feel good,'' Roenicke said, who didn't want to enter the season in the final guaranteed year of his contract. ''It's uncomfortable, especially when I concentrate so much on what I'm doing with my job, I don't want to have to answer questions about the personal side of it.''

Roenicke said he has a great working relationship with general manager Doug Melvin.

''I really like where I am. I love the city. I love the management,'' he said. ''He went out on a limb and gave me this opportunity.''

Roenicke admitted he was wondering where he stood at the end of last season after the Brewers faltered.

''It's part of the job. I know you say fair or unfair, but its part of the job,'' he said. ''At times we know as managers that we can do everything right, but things can be wrong and you can still be let go. And if that's just going to crush you, you shouldn't be doing the job.''

''We're happy and excited for him,'' said outfielder Ryan Braun, who slumped along with the team down the stretch in 2014. ''We've all said many times we enjoy him being our manager,'' Ryan Braun said. ''We appreciate his support and what a great manager he is. He's a lot of fun to play for.''

Jonathan Lucroy said players respect Roenicke's even-keel approach.

''He tells you what he thinks. He's honest and that's all you can ask from a manager and I appreciate that,'' the catcher said. ''He always takes you aside and talks to you. He doesn't blow you up in the dugout or throw things around. It's a sign of self control and that he doesn't want to show you up.''

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