Here's everything you need to know about the college football leaping rule.

By Nihal Kolur
September 01, 2018

Football rules are often complicated.

Such is the case with college football's leaping rule, which is designed to prevent players from landing on each other while trying to block kicks. Last year, the rule was expanded to disallow defenders running towards the line of scrimmage and hurdling blockers, whether they land on them or not.

The rule isn't invoked often, but can result in a 15-yard penalty and an automatic first down. In 2016, the rule cost Michigan State a game against Indiana after the Hoosiers' kicker missed his field goal attempt but was allowed another try.

Officials ruled that Michigan State defender Drake Martinez landed on another player and caused the penalty. The new rule means that even if Martinez didn't land on a player, a penalty would be called either way.

However, there is a caveat. A lineman who is stationary at the line of scrimmage can leap over a defender. 

Regardless of the rule, there will surely be some unhappy fans when penalties such as this one are called.

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HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)