Picking each MLB team's No. 1 prospect for 2017

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Wednesday February 22nd, 2017

One of the pleasures of welcoming baseball back every year is sifting through the major prospect lists. Admittedly, they’re imperfect predictors of who will pan out and who will bust—prospect evaluation is an inexact science, and it’s not hard to find disagreements between evaluators—but the lists are fun to read. At this time of year they also offer cues about whom to keep an eye on early in spring training.

After scouring the lists of Baseball America, Baseball Prospectus, ESPN and MLB Pipeline (MLB.com), what follows here is a look at each team’s top prospect—not necessarily someone who will help the big club in 2017, but someone whose name should become familiar. A few already are, thanks to major league bloodlines or inclusion in past blockbusters. Sometimes, there’s a strong consensus about who that player is, but sometimes it’s a split decision, because the hard-working folks behind these lists all vary in their philosophies and their views of each player’s tools.

For each player listed, I’ve identified the publication that ranked him the highest. The player ages are as of June 30, and the ETAs are, of course, estimates.

Arizona Diamondbacks: Anthony Banda, LHP

2017 Age: 23
Highest Prospect Ranking: 88 (BA)
MLB ETA: 2017

ESPN’s Keith Law called the Diamondbacks' system the game's worst; the BP staff added that it's "almost entirely devoid of impact talent;" and three of the four lists didn't include a single Arizona player in their rankings. Nonetheless, Banda is no lost cause. A 10th-round 2012 pick who was acquired from the Brewers in the '14 deadline trade for Gerardo Parra, he's improved steadily over the past two seasons and now offers a fastball that sits in the mid-90s, a curve that some see as a plus pitch (60 on the 20–80 scouting grade scale) and a changeup that's at least average and should help him counter righties. He's a potential third or fourth starter who should make his MLB debut sometime this year.

Atlanta Braves: Dansby Swanson, SS

2017 Age: 23
Highest Prospect Ranking: 2 (BP, ESPN)
MLB ETA: Debuted 2016

The No. 1 pick of the 2015 draft and the centerpiece of last winter's Shelby Miller heist, Swanson played 38 games for the Braves last year, hitting .302/.361/.442 with three homers and three steals and falling one at-bat short (129) of exhausting his rookie status. On the offensive side, he's an ideal No. 2 hitter with an advanced approach at the plate and plus speed on the bases, but his strikeout rate is a bit high given that he only has gap power. Defensively, he's got exceptional range, an above-average arm and good hands. He'll not only stick at shortstop but also be a natural leader and a franchise player. 

Baltimore Orioles: Chance Sisco, C

2017 Age: 22
Highest Prospect Ranking: 57 (BA)
MLB ETA: 2018

With Matt Wieters departing via free agency, the O's have a long-term need for a catcher, but Sisco is not the second coming of his predecessor, who was a consensus No. 1 prospect circa 2009. A second-round 2013 draft pick, Sisco hit .320/.406/.422 with four homers in 479 plate appearances last year at Double A Bowie before getting a brief promotion to Triple A Norfolk. As that stat line suggests, he's got a plus hit tool but has yet to unlock the in-game power hinted at by an opposite-field homer at last summer's Futures Game at Petco Park. He's less advanced defensively, with a fringy arm, below-average pop times and game-calling skills that are a work in progress, though he projects to wind up as an average defender. Along with his offensive skills, that should make him an above-average player, but probably not a star. 

Boston Red Sox: Andrew Benintendi, OF

2017 Age: 22
Highest Prospect Ranking: 1 (BA, BP, ESPN)
MLB ETA: Debuted 2016

The seventh pick of the 2015 draft, Arkansas product Benintendi shot to the majors and the top of three of the four major lists in his first full professional season and hit .295/.359/.476 in 118 plate appearances with the Red Sox late last year. Though not a big guy (listed at 5'10" and 170 pounds), his compact and sometimes violent swing generates plus power thanks to quick hands and the loft in his swing; he figures to generate 20 homers and a ton of doubles per year. More special is his hit tool, generally considered plus-plus (70 grade), with Alex Speier reporting, "Multiple evaluators believe that Benintendi has a chance to be a perennial All-Star who competes for batting titles." His above-average speed plays up thanks to good instincts, and while he could cover centerfield, on the Red Sox he's slated for left, where his range could make him a Gold Glove contender.

Chicago Cubs: Eloy Jimenez, OF

2017 Age: 20
Highest Prospect Ranking: 9 (BP)
MLB ETA: 2019

This strapping 6'4" Dominican—whom the Cubs signed for a $2.8 million bonus in 2013—tore up the A-level Midwest League as a 19-year-old (.329/.369/.532 with 14 homers). He's drawn comparisons to Giancarlo Stanton based on his size, bat speed and plus-plus power; perhaps not coincidentally, he homered off the third-level facade at last summer's Futures Game in Petco Park. His hit tool is a plus, as he uses the whole field well and doesn't sell out for power. On the downside, he could stand to walk more (just 25 free passes in 464 plate appearances in 2016) and is a below-average runner. Defensively, his arm has been called "fringy," though he's young enough that if he commits to improving his throwing accuracy, then rightfield could be his destination instead of left. He'll likely start the year in Class A.

Chicago White Sox: Yoan Moncada, 2B/3B

2017 Age: 22
Highest Prospect Ranking: 2 (BA, MLB)
MLB ETA: Debuted 2016

The Red Sox thought so highly of the 6'2", 205-pound Moncada that they paid a 100% tax on a $31.5 million bonus upon signing him out of Cuba in February 2015. He finished at .294/.407/.511 in 2016 with 15 homers and 45 steals after continuing to hit well at Double A Portland, but an ugly September showing with the Red Sox (12 strikeouts in 19 at-bats and a base-running gaffe that buried him on the bench) dimmed his luster after he’d topped the BA and MLB midseason prospect lists. On Dec. 6, he was dealt to the White Sox as the centerpiece of the Chris Sale return.

Still, there’s plenty to love about the switch-hitting, athletic second baseman, who has tremendous bat speed and offers plus power from both sides of the plate. He's drawn comparisons to Robinson Cano from the left side but has more speed and arm than Cano—both tools have been graded as high as plus-plus—though his play at second base has been described as "stiff." He looked more natural in a late-season trial at third base, and some scouts have suggested he belongs in centerfield, but for now he's staying at the keystone and will likely spend most of the season at Triple A.

Cincinnati Reds: Nick Senzel, 3B

2017 Age: 22
Highest Prospect Ranking: 9 (BA)
MLB ETA: 2017/18

The No. 2 pick out of Tennessee in 2016, Senzel was considered the draft's best college bat and got off to a strong professional start at Class A Dayton (.329/.415/.567 with seven homers and 15 steals in 58 games). All five of his tools grade between average and plus, which makes him a very safe bet in the long run rather than a perennial All-Star. With good bat speed, advanced pitch recognition and plus raw power, he's a potential middle-of-the-order bat, one whose speed and instincts make him a base-stealing threat as well. Defensively, he's got a strong, accurate arm with good hands and range. Though he'll likely start the year at high A, he could get a September look and should compete for a major league job next year.

Cleveland Indians: Francisco Mejia, C

2017 Age: 21
Highest Prospect Ranking: 18 (ESPN)
MLB ETA: 2018

This undersized  (5'10", 175 pounds) switch-hitting catcher reeled off a 50-game hitting streak last summer, the minors' longest since 1954, and finished with a .342/.382/.514 line with 11 homers at two Class A stops. He's got an aggressive approach and makes hard contact from both sides with a surprising amount of pop, with the potential for 15–20 homers. Defensively, his arm drew an 80 grade from Baseball America; the rest of his receiving skills lag behind, but he has the potential to be at least average behind the plate. Summarized Law, his top proponent: "[I]f Mejia catches, he might be MVP-worthy, like Joe Mauer, but with a better build for the position."

Colorado Rockies: Brendan Rodgers, SS

2017 Age: 21
Highest Prospect Ranking: 11 (BP)
MLB ETA: 2019

The No. 3 pick of the 2015 draft behind Dansby Swanson and Alex Bregman—college players who are already in the majors—Rogers hit 281/.342/.480 with 19 homers at low A ball in 2016. He's got elite bat speed, strength and a polished approach, with hit and power tools that project to be either above-average or plus. He's got a plus arm and great hands, but some see him as a bit stiff at shortstop; he could wind up at second or third depending upon whether he maintains his range and where the Rockies have openings once he's ready. He'll put up big numbers at hitter-friendly Class A Lancaster, but he's got a ways to go. 

Detroit Tigers: Matt Manning, RHP

2017 Age: 19
Highest Prospect Ranking: 61 (BA)
MLB ETA: 2020

The lone Tigers prospect on three of the four lists, Manning was the ninth pick of last year's draft out of a Sacramento high school; the 6'6" righty is the son of former NBA player Rich Manning. He's barely gotten his feet wet professionally, but he struck out 46 of the 88 hitters he faced in 29 1/3 innings in the Gulf Coast League last year. Manning's fastball sits 96–97 mph and plays up thanks to his extension and steep downhill plane. He's got a power curve, too, of which the BP team says, "What impresses most is that he can locate the deuce for strikes at the bottom of the zone or bury it to finish off batters." His changeup has the potential to be average or above-average, and he gets high marks for his makeup. In all, he has the potential to be a frontline starter.

Houston Astros: Francis Martes, RHP

2017 Age: 21
Highest Prospect Ranking: 15 (BA)
MLB ETA: 2017

Acquired from the Marlins in a 2014 deadline swap centered around Jarred Cosart, the Dominican-born Martes draw Johnny Cueto comparisons for his burly stature (6'1" and 225 pounds) and future frontline potential. In 2016 at Double A Corpus Christi, he posted a tidy 3.30 ERA with 9.4 strikeouts per nine in 125 1/3 innings, allowing just four homers. His fastball and curve are both plus-plus pitches: The heater sits in the low 90s with sink, but he can gas it up to 98–99 mph, and his hard curve "comes in at slider speed with tight rotation and late 11–5 break, and he has shown capable of working it in zone to steal strikes or taking it below as a potent chase pitch," according to BP. His changeup gets plus grades from some but lacks consistency, and he's experimented with a cutter against righties. Martes will start the year in Triple A and should see the majors at some point this year. 

Kansas City Royals: Hunter Dozier, 3B/OF

2017 Age: 25
Highest Prospect Ranking: None
MLB ETA: Debuted in 2016

The Royals didn't land a single prospect on any top-100 list, and three different players have topped the team lists of BA, BP and ESPN; MLB has yet to issue theirs, but Dozier topped last year's in-season list, so he breaks the tie. The eighth pick of the 2013 draft out of Stephen F. Austin State, he hit a combined .296/.366/.533 with 15 homers split between Double and Triple A before a September look with Kansas City. He's old for a prospect, and both his hit and power tools get average-to-above-average ratings, with more concerns about the latter given the likelihood that he'll wind up in an outfield corner because he's a fringe-average defender at third base. 

Los Angeles Angels: Jahmai Jones, OF

2017 Age: 19
Highest Prospect Ranking: 78 (BP)
MLB ETA: 2020

The Angels' system is one of the majors' worst, and Jones, a second-round 2015 pick, made only two of the four lists, but at his age, that's still not a bad thing. Jones got a taste of the Midwest League after hitting .321/.404/.459 with three homers and 19 steals in 48 games of Rookie ball. An all-state wide receiver in Georgia, he's athletic but raw, with speed his lone plus tool but all five grading out at least average. He gets high marks for his makeup and baseball IQ, but he's a ways from helping the big club.

Los Angeles Dodgers: Cody Bellinger, 1B

2017 Age: 21
Highest Prospect Ranking: 6 (ESPN)
MLB ETA: 2017

If the son of former Yankees utilityman Clay Bellinger doesn't outdo his old man, something will have gone very wrong, because the 6'4" lefty is among the top dozen prospects on three of the four lists and is a star in the making. A fourth-round 2013 pick out of an Arizona high school, he's drawing acclaim for his rapid adjustments; in '16, he hit .263/.359/.484 with 23 homers at Double A Tulsa, with three more knocks in three games at Triple A Oklahoma City. Bellinger has plus-plus power and has been successful at shortening his swing to cut down on strikeouts. Thanks to his size and mobility, his defense grades out as plus-plus as well; he could be a Gold Glove contender at first base and can play the outfield as well, even spotting in centerfield. With Adrian Gonzalez signed through 2018, Bellinger is the heir apparent and could help the Dodgers down the stretch later this year.

Miami Marlins: Braxton Garrett, LHP

2017 Age: 19
Highest Prospect Ranking: 42 (ESPN)
MLB ETA: 2020

The Marlins have a bottom-tier system at the moment—the second-worst, via ESPN—but Braxton, the seventh pick of the 2016 draft out of an Alabama high school, was considered the second-best high school southpaw in the draft; he didn't pitch beyond the instructional league after signing. Garrett has a low-90s fastball with late life, and scouts envision him adding velocity as he fills out his 6'3", 190-pound frame. His best pitch is a plus curve "regarded by scouts to be among the best in the 2016 Draft class," per MLB Pipeline; his changeup should be average or better, and his command is advanced. He could jump directly to full-season ball but is a ways off from his ceiling as a No. 2 starter.

Milwaukee Brewers: Lewis Brinson, OF

2017 Age: 22
Highest Prospect Ranking: 12 (BP)
MLB ETA: 2017

The centerpiece of the Brewers' return from the Rangers in the Jonathan Lucroy trade, Brinson hit a combined .268/.305/.468 with 15 homers and 17 steals at Double and Triple A, with a brief detour to Rookie ball to rehab a left (non-throwing) shoulder strain that cost him three weeks. Baseball America gives him 60 grades on all but his defense (55), but his production has yet to come around, and he's done a lot of tinkering. He has the speed to be an outstanding centerfielder, but both his routes and throwing accuracy need work. Likewise, while he has great bat speed and impressive raw power, he's still undisciplined and vulnerable to chasing breaking balls out of the zone. If he can make enough contact, he's got All-Star potential. 

Minnesota Twins: Nick Gordon, SS

2017 Age: 21
Highest Prospect Ranking: 48 (BP)
MLB ETA: 2018/19

The son of former All-Star reliever Tom Gordon and half-brother of the Marlins' Dee Gordon, Nick was the fifth pick of the 2014 draft. He spent 2016 in high A ball, where he hit .291/.335/.386 with three homers and 19 steals. The lefty swinger has a plus hit tool with a whole field approach but has struggled against lefties thus far and has little power (30 grade, ouch) and just average speed, which can seem like a disappointment when the family tree has a two-time stolen base champ. Most impressive about Gordon is his plus arm, which combined with his average range, good hands and great instincts suggests an above-average defender at shortstop. He'll start at Double A in 2017.

New York Mets: Amed Rosario, SS

2017 Age: 21
Highest Prospect Ranking: 3 (ESPN)
MLB ETA: 2017

You’d have to go all the way back to 2003 to find a Mets position-player prospect who rates as highly as Rosario: four-time All-Star Jose Reyes, though the shapes of the two Dominican shortstops’ games are different. Rosario, who hit a combined .324/.374/.459 with five homers and 19 steals at Class A and Double A, has outstanding bat speed and contact abilities; his hit tool is a plus, and while most see below-average power, there's the potential for more as he fills out his 6'2", 170-pound frame. His speed grades out as at least a plus, but his defensive ability is his real selling point; BA graded him as plus-plus and called him "a true impact defender" thanks to his range and arm strength. In short, there's All-Star and Gold Glove potential here, and he could see the majors this year and become the starting shortstop in 2018. 

New York Yankees: Gleyber Torres, SS

2017 Age: 20
Highest Prospect Ranking: 3 (ESPN)
MLB ETA: 2018

Signed out of Venezuela for a $1.7 million bonus by the Cubs in 2013, Torres was acquired in the Aroldis Chapman trade and rocketed into the top five of three of the four lists thanks to his post-trade showing, which included becoming the youngest MVP ever in the Arizona Fall League. As a 19-year-old, he hit .270/.354/.421 with 11 homers and 21 steals in 547 plate appearances at two Class A stops. He draws raves for his pitch recognition skills, exceptionally quick hands and advanced approach at the plate; his hit tool grades out as plus, with his power above average, and some see 20-homer potential. Defensively, he's got a plus arm and soft hands, though there's a split as to whether he'll stick at short or wind up at second or third. The Yankees won't have to decide immediately, as he's likely to start the year in Double A. He could be a list-topper a year from now.

Oakland Athletics: Franklin Barreto, SS

2017 Age: 21
Highest Prospect Ranking: 40 (BA)
MLB ETA: Late 2017

The trade of Josh Donaldson to the Blue Jays hasn't worked out well for the A's, but Barreto may yet help to balance the scale. The Venezuelan shortstop went through some ups and downs in 2016 but finished at .281/.340/.413 with 10 homers and 30 steals—a solid showing for a 20-year-old in Double A—and briefly tasted Triple A in September. He's a line-drive hitter with a short, quick stroke, but while his hit tool is a plus, his power is just average. Once a burner, he's thickened through his trunk and legs, so his speed is merely above average. Continued growth could push him off shortstop, where he's just an average defender; his arm could play better at second base, and centerfield is a possibility as well.

Philadelphia Phillies: J.P. Crawford, SS

2017 Age: 22
Highest Prospect Ranking: 4 (BP)
MLB ETA: 2017

The 16th pick in 2013, Crawford is coming off a somewhat disappointing season (.250/.349/.339 with seven homers and 12 steals in 36 games at Double A and 87 at Triple A), struggling against advanced arms. A high-contact hitter with a compact stroke and excellent plate discipline, he could be a top-of-the-lineup hitter even despite just average speed. His power hasn't developed as quickly as expected, but as he fills out his 6'2", 180-pound frame, he could be a double-digit home run threat. By itself that's not terribly exciting, but his defense has Gold Glove potential thanks to a plus arm, good range and fast hands, and he figures to be an All-Star and a cornerstone of the Phillies' rebuilt lineup. He'll start the year at Triple A and could be up in the second half.

Pittsburgh Pirates: Austin Meadows, OF

2017 Age: 22
Highest Prospect Ranking: 6 (BA, BP)
MLB ETA: Late 2017

The ninth pick of the 2013 draft, Meadows appeared as though he might wind up with a big league job sooner rather than later given the Pirates' attempts to trade Andrew McCutchen, though the former MVP's continued presence—and shift to rightfield—slows down the timetable. That may not be a bad thing given that injuries have limited Meadows to 307 minor league games in four seasons, costing him developmental time. In 2016, he hit .266/.333/.536 with 12 homers and 17 steals in 87 games, splitting his season between Double and Triple A, with a brief detour to low A ball after missing a month due to a hamstring injury. He's got a plus hit tool and plus raw power that's only starting to manifest in games and is more likely a No. 2 hitter than a middle-of-the-order guy. Fast and athletic enough to play a competent centerfield, he'll likely move to a corner, though some feel he may not have the arm for right. Expect him later in the season, whether or not McCutchen is still around.

St. Louis Cardinals: Alex Reyes, RHP

2017 Age: 22
Highest Prospect Ranking: 1 (BP)
MLB ETA: Debuted 2016

As this list isn't just about 2017 impact, Reyes—who just days after being anointed the No. 1 prospect by Baseball Prospectus (the only player besides Andrew Benintendi to top the major lists this year) went under the knife for Tommy John surgery—still gets the nod for the Cardinals even though he'll miss the entire season. Though his 2016 season started with a 50-game suspension for marijuana use, the 6'3" righty ended the year posting a 1.57 ERA with 10.2 strikeouts per nine in 46 innings for St. Louis. Reyes owns an elite fastball that sits 96–100 mph fastball and can touch 102, with a hammer curve that is a plus-plus pitch, as well as a plus changeup. "The overall arsenal is potentially one of the best in baseball—not the minors, baseball," wrote the BP folks. Alas, we'll have to wait at least a year to see it again.

San Diego Padres: Anderson Espinoza, RHP

2017 Age: 22
Highest Prospect Ranking: 21 (BA, ESPN)
MLB ETA: 2019

Acquired from the Red Sox last July in exchange for lefty Drew Pomeranz, the slightly built (6'0", 160 lbs) Venezuelan has drawn comparisons to Pedro Martinez. He's got exceptional command to both sides of the plate with his 95–98 mph fastball and already has two plus secondary pitches: a 70-grade changeup and a 60-grade curve, though his command of the latter is spotty, which led to an unexceptional 4.49 ERA at two Class A stops in 2016. He's got the stuff to be a legitimate ace and could reach the majors sometime in 2018 before arriving for good the next season.

San Francisco Giants: Tyler Beede, RHP

2017 Age: 24
Highest Prospect Ranking: 62 (ESPN)
MLB ETA: Late 2017

Hit hard by trades, the Giants’ system doesn't have much in the way of high-end prospects; Beede, their 2014 first-round pick out of Vanderbilt, is the only one who cracked a major list. After a rough three-month introduction to Double A in 2015, he fared much better the second time around, posting a 2.81 ERA with 8.2 strikeouts per nine in 147 1/3 innings. The 6'3" righty throws a 92–94 mph four-seam fastball, a two-seamer and a promising cutter as well. His curve and changeup are both average-to-plus, depending upon whom you ask. Lacking a true put-away pitch, it's not an overwhelming package given some command and control issues, but he could help fill out the Giants' rotation in the not-too-distant future.

Seattle Mariners: Kyle Lewis, OF

2017 Age: 21
Highest Prospect Ranking: 29 (MLB)
MLB ETA: 2019

The 11th pick of the 2016 draft out of Mercer University, Lewis hit .299/.385/.530 with three homers and three steals in 30 games at Class A in 2016 before tearing his right ACL as well as the medial and lateral menisci in a home plate collision; already, there's concern that the injury will force him to rightfield, given that his speed graded out as average at best. His best tools, both graded as plus, are his arm and his power, the latter of which plays to all fields and gives him 30-homer potential. His hit tool is a bit less developed, in that he's a patient hitter with a whole-field approach but a long swing. He won't resume baseball activity until April, and the Mariners hope he'll be playing full-season ball by mid-summer.

Tampa Bay Rays: Willy Adames, SS

2017 Age: 21
Highest Prospect Ranking: 10 (BA)
MLB ETA: 2018

The key piece in the 2014 trade of David Price to the Tigers is now within sight of the majors after a breakout season in which he hit .274/.372/.430 with 11 homers and 13 steals at Double A Montgomery. Adames has shown continued improvement in his approach, working deep into counts and cutting down his strikeout rate, and producing line drives to all fields. He's added opposite-field power and now projects to hit 15–20 homers a year to go with his plus hit tool. His ability to stay at shortstop is in question; he's got the hands and the arm, but his lateral range isn't exceptional. If it all breaks right, he's a middle-of-the-order shortstop with the makeup to be a leader, though a move to second or third base is possible.

Texas Rangers: Yohander Mendez, LHP

2017 Age: 22
Highest Prospect Ranking: 39 (BP)
MLB ETA: Debuted 2016

Signed for $1.5 million out of Venezuela in 2011 as part of the same international spending spree that landed Nomar Mazara, Mendez won't blow you away with his stuff (he averages 90–93 mph with his fastball) and looked like a deer in the headlights in his MLB cup of coffee last year, getting tagged for six runs on five hits and three walks in only three innings, though he got to the majors after starting the year way down in Class A. But the lanky Dominican lefty (6'4" and just 180 pounds) boasts good sinking action on his fastball and an excellent changeup (MLB Pipeline calls it "one of the best ... among pitching prospects"), as well as an in-development slider. Couple that with his good control (a walk rate of 2.8 per nine in 292 2/3 minor league innings) and spot-on ability to locate (a miniscule 0.5 home-run-per-nine rate), and you have the makings of a potential mid-rotation starter. As Baseball Prospectus put it in their writeup of Mendez, "The sum here is greater than the parts."

Toronto Blue Jays: Vladimir Guerrero, Jr., OF

2017 Age: 18
Highest Prospect Ranking: 20 (BA)
MLB ETA: 2020

Born in the spring before his father made his first All-Star team, Vlad Jr. has been the apple of the Blue Jays' eye since he took swings in their Dominican complex at age 14. As a 17-year-old in the Rookie-level Appalachian League, he hit .271/.359/.449 with eight homers and 15 steals in 67 games. Scouts gush over his hand-eye coordination, strike zone judgment and power, envisioning an above-average hitter capable of 30-homers. He's got a plus arm and plays a solid third base considering that he’s relatively new to the position. Rest assured, you'll hear about his progress up the ladder.

Washington Nationals: Victor Robles, OF

2017 Age: 20
Highest Prospect Ranking: 7 (BP, MLB)
MLB ETA: 2018

The Dominican-born Robles finished the season as the youngest player in the Class A Carolina League and hit .280/.376/.423 with nine homers, 37 steals and a remarkable 34 hit-by-pitches across three levels; one of those plunkings cost him three weeks due to a thumb injury. A five-tool centerfielder who gets additional high marks for his makeup and baseball IQ, Robles has speed that grades out as plus-plus as well as a plus arm and should be able to stay in centerfield. His bat speed is outstanding, and his approach advanced given his age; his power grades out as merely average, but some think the hit tool could eventually be plus-plus. "He's a few years away from the Majors, but Robles is well on his way towards becoming a franchise player," wrote MLB Pipeline.

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