How will the Seahawks use their picks in the 2018 NFL draft? We’re breaking down every selection.

By Tim Hackett
April 26, 2018

The NFL postseason didn't feature the Seahawks for the first time since 2011, as Pete Carroll's squad was decidedly average in most statistical categories and finished the year 9-7 in 2017. The front office has not been shy about revamping, and that means longtime figureheads like Richard Sherman, Michael Bennett and Jimmy Graham are gone, to the 49ers, Eagles and Packers, respectively.

Other defensive mainstays like Bobby Wagner, Kam Chancellor and Earl Thomas are still around for new defensive coordinator Ken Norton, Jr., and Russell Wilson and Doug Baldwin are back for new offensive coordinator Brian Schottenheimer.

Seattle's running game was inconsistent at best in 2017, and neither Thomas Rawls nor Eddie Lacy are back. 

The Seahawks were involved in a big trade on draft day, sending Green Bay the No. 18 pick along with a seventh rounder in exchange for the No. 27 pick, a third rounder and a sixth rounder.

How will they use their picks in the NFL draft? We’re breaking down every selection below.

Here's the full list of picks the Seahawks hold in the 2018 draft, which will be updated as each selection is made.

Round 1, Pick 27 (No. 27 overall) [via Green Bay]

Rashaad Penny, RB, San Diego State

Andy Benoit's grade: C-

Wait, what? With glaring needs at cornerback and edge rusher, and Iowa corner Josh Jackson and BC edge man Harold Landry still on the board, the Seahawks drafted a running back? (And that running back wasn’t Derrius Guice?) Look, GM John Schneider and head coach Pete Carroll studied all of these prospects infinitely more than we did, and they’re obviously familiar with his team’s needs. And it should be noted that over the years the Seahawks have successfully found lanky press corners in the middle rounds of the draft. They acquired more mid-round capital by trading back in the first round. There’s also a case to be made on the other side of the ball: this team was at its best when the offense ran through Marshawn Lynch. A run-first offense naturally creates more leeway for Russell Wilson’s sandlot style. So we certainly can’t call this pick a blunder. But it’s very surprising the Seahawks didn’t address their D-line or secondary.

Scouting Report: The reigning Division I rushing champion, Penny is a big back with nimble feet to get creative and the leg drive to churn out yards between the tackles. He’s raw in the passing game and will likely have to come off the field on third downs early in his career, but he was a prolific kick returner at the collegiate level.

Round 3, Pick 15 (No. 79 overall) [via Pittsburgh]: Rasheem Green, DE, USC

Andy Benoit's grade: B+

The rebuilding of this once-epic defense must involve pass rushers, as the trade of Michael Bennett and likely retirement of Cliff Avril leaves the Seahawks bereft of many. The fact that this role wasn’t addressed until the third round suggests the Seahawks plan on hanging onto Frank Clark, at least on a trial basis in 2019.

Round 4, Pick 20 (No. 120 overall): Will Dissly, TE, Washington

Round 5, Pick 4 (No. 141 overall): Shaquem Griffin, LB, UCF

Round 5, Pick 9 (No. 146 overall): Tre Flowers, S, Oklahoma State

Round 5, Pick 12 (No. 149 overall): Michael Dickson, P, Texas

Round 5, Pick 31 (No. 168 overall): Jamarco Jones, T, Ohio State

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Round 6, Pick 12 (No. 186 overall) [via Green Bay]: Jacob Martin, DE, Temple

Round 7, Pick 2 (No. 220 overall): Alex McCough, QB, Florida International​ 

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