Burnley manager Sean Dyche has claimed that it is becoming increasingly difficult for young British coaches to secure jobs in the Premier League.

By 90Min
November 29, 2017

Burnley manager Sean Dyche has claimed that it is becoming increasingly difficult for young British coaches to secure jobs in the Premier League.

He will take his side to Bournemouth on Wednesday night to face off against a fellow young British boss in Eddie Howe, but both are anomalies in England's top flight.

With Alan Pardew having been appointed at West Brom and Sam Allardyce set to take charge of Everton, many have complained that the path of young coaches is being blocked by those more experienced managers.

"It will be really tough, development wise, for young managers and coaches, if the modern thinking of European and worldwide coaches continues into the game," Dyche said, quoted by the Lancashire Telegraph.

"There’s a lot now in the Premier League and, while I don’t know the current stats on it, it looks like there’s more foreign coaches going into the Championship. 

"Everyone wants to be here – a lot of managers, coaches and players – but is that good for British managers coming through? It’s obviously not ideal."

Dyche also claimed that the incessant pressure on Premier League clubs to win is resulting in less ambitious, safer appointments.

"In football now the buy in is ‘win, end of story,'" he added. "Win and be in the Premier League or win, stay in the Premier League, or whatever it is in the Premier League. 

"That demand is so high now that the first port of call is not young players; it’s stay in the Premier League or get in the Premier League.

“The managers who get into the Premier League are under pressure to stay in there. It’s like anything in life, you often go for anything that you deem to be reliable rather than, ‘all right, let’s give them a chance.’

"The business has changed as much as anything. It is getting harder for younger managers – forget about British. David Wagner has had to come through the playoffs to get there (the Premier League); he may have not got there if that wouldn’t have happened.

"I don’t think it’s just about British. But I think it’s tougher to be a British manager at the top level because the demands are so high so they [owners] go with who they think give you more a guaranteed view of it."

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