The California State Athletic Commission on Tuesday announced several rules changes.

The most impacting -- at least publicly -- will likely be the "Change of Decision" addition. Rule 368 grants the Commission the option to change a victory to a "no decision" if the winning fighter returns a positive drug test result. Although it had already been instituted and utilized in Nevada, the California commission has not had the option available until now. The rule will be utilized on a case-by-case basis and does not automatically change the decision of a bout.

The following are the rules changes issued by CSAC Assistant Executive Director Bill Douglas:

Rule 227: Arbitration Procedures

This rule change formalizes the process for athletes and managers/promoters engaged in a contract dispute arbitrated by CSAC and the AG's Office. Forms will be available online very shortly that must be submitted in order to request arbitration.

Rule 281: Physical Condition of Boxer

This rule change specifies guidelines related to the condition of an athlete prior to licensure.

Rule 303: Administration of Use of Drugs

This rule change specifies that any athlete who has previously tested positive for anabolic agents or drugs of abuse must provide a "clean" drug test as a condition of licensure prior to being licensed or having his or her license renewed. Additionally, the rule clearly defines the classifications of drugs that are tested for.

Rules 314 and 523: Alternate Ring Specifications

This rule change allows pro and amateur boxing, pro and amateur kickboxing, and mixed martial arts to be held in the five roped ring at the same event.

Rule 323: Bandages

This rule change permits 10 yards of tape and 20 yards of bandage for each hand as part of the hand wrap.

Rule 368: Change of Decision

This rule change states that a positive drug test will permit the Commission to change a victory to a "no decision." This rule change will apply to drugs of abuse on a case-by-case basis.

Rule 389: Appeal Procedures

This rule change formalizes the process for athletes in an appeal hearing for a suspension or fine by CSAC. The community wanted it, well, the community gets what they asked for (a formal procedure for appeals written into California law spreading the time equally between both the Attorney General and the athlete's representation). Forms will be available online very shortly that must be submitted in order to request an appeal hearing.

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