Television is swamped with negative advertising. Most of the ads come from Apple, but there are also a few from presidential candidates (I'm looking at you, Brian Moore of the Liberty Union Party.) This week, the NFL is joining the negative ad craze. With many undecided fair weather fans still up for grabs the eight division leaders have each produced commercials attacking each other. Here's a sneak peek.

A shot of the Giants celebrating their Super Bowl victory over the Patriots.

Narrator: The Giants are Super Bowl Champions. With that honor came trips to famous theme parks and jewel-encrusted rings. All the fans got was a $7 increase in ticket prices.

Seven $1 bills are quickly snatched up by a black glove. Broke Giants fans hop a subway turnstile.

Narrator: The last team to raise ticket prices during an economic downturn was the Portsmouth Spartans in 1931. We all know how that turned out.

An old newspaper headline proclaims, "Spartans move to Detroit; Team renamed 'Lions.'

Narrator: Do you want to support an NFL team that's more concerned with putting dollars in their wallet than your butt in their seats? I don't think so.

The kids from Hanson play music on stage. Evander Holyfield clutches his bloody ear. Bill Clinton waves at his inauguration.

Narrator: 1997. It was the last year the Cardinals made the playoffs. Can a team mired in such severe mediocrity win a Super Bowl?

Close up on Kurt Warner's graying beard.

Narrator: Kurt Warner is old. Really, really, old. And he has a dangerous medical history full of concussions. Do you trust Matt Leinart? In an interview with CBS' Phil Simms, the young QB couldn't even explain the Cover-2. Also, he's a celebrity.

The photo of Leinart with Paris Hilton flashes on screen.

Narrator: Don't be fooled by the Cardinals. They're still the Cardinals.

A Jake Delhomme-Steve Smith Bojangles commercial plays in the background.

Narrator: Meet Kayla Brown.

A quick shot of an adorable 8-year-old-girl. The Bojangles commercial resumes playing.

Narrator: She was the biggest Panthers fan in her 3rd grade glass. When she saw her two favorite players urging her to go to eat at Bojangles, she begged her parents to take her. Finally they relented.

Close up of chicken and biscuits.

Narrator: Kayla had the chicken and biscuits. But then something went wrong. Very wrong. The chicken wasn't cooked. Kayla got sick.

A grainy image of a girl running to the bathroom

Narrator: How can Delhomme and Smith support a company that wants to make little girls sick? It doesn't make sense, and neither does supporting the Panthers.

The front of a large skyscraper bustles with businessman

Narrator: The Chicago Bears currently have over 15 corporate partnerships. One of the Bears' "partners" is FreeCreditReport.com. We are in a financial crisis, yet the Bears are still taking money from people in the credit industry.

A panicked Wall Street floor. The market plunges.

Narrator: Remember Freddie Mac CEO David Moffett? He attended the University of Oklahoma, the same school as Bears tackle Tommie Harris.

An old clip of Harris shows him in his Oklahoma crimson.

Narrator: Coincidence? Unlikely. Who are the Bears really working for? Their fans, or their wealthy financial lobbyist friends? Now is the time to show the Bears you're sick and tired of a team under the influence of the credit industry.

Photos of recent Broncos running backs scroll across the screen.

Narrator: Michael Pittman. Selvin Young. Travis Henry. Tatum Bell. Mike Bell. Mike Anderson. They've all been part of the Broncos running back platoon over the years.

A middle-aged man sits on his couch.

Kevin Anderson: Hi, I'm Kevin Anderson. Last year I was cruising to victory in my company's fantasy football league. Then, in the midst of a key playoff match, Selvin Young was replaced by Travis Henry during a crucial series. I ended up losing by one point to that new female intern who tried to use her 2nd pick on Jerry Rice because he was her favorite contestant on Dancing with the Stars. After the loss I became the office laughingstock. I had no choice but to quit. My wife soon left me and my television was repossessed. Don't let it happen to you. Stay away from the Broncos.

Narrator: "Fantasy Football Players for Platoon Freedom" is responsible for the content of this ad.

A defensive back returns an interception in slow motion.

Narrator: The Tennessee Titans. They're 8-0 and sport one of the stingiest defenses in the NFL. But what about their quarterback Kerry Collins. Did you know in 2004 he threw 20 interceptions?

Collins is pancaked by a lineman as the cornerback scores a touchdown.

Narrator: And the following year he went 4-11 as a starter. Even worse, it was for Al Davis' Oakland Raiders.

Davis' greased hair, sunglasses, and shadowy face appear on screen.

Narrator: Davis is known to be one of the most reckless people in the NFL. Why would Collins associate with him? Were they more than just an owner and a quarterback? The Titans are not to be trusted.

A photo of Bengals linebacker Keith Rivers

Narrator: This is Keith Rivers. He won't play football again this year. His jaw is wired shut. He has to eat food through a straw. That's right, a straw. All because he was blindsided by Steelers receiver Hines Ward.

Video of Ward's hit on Rivers plays over and over.

Narrator: And what was Ward's response? He just smiled and smiled and smiled.

Close up on a photo of Ward's 1000- watt smile.

Narrator: What's Ward so happy about? Losing at home in the playoffs last year?

Ward walks off the field after last season's playoff loss.

Narrator: Hines Ward doesn't care about Keith the Linebacker, and the neither do the Steelers.

A scowling Bill Belichick looks at the camera for 30 seconds. Occasionally a photo of Tom Brady and Giselle Bundchen appears next to him.

Narrator: If you root for the Patriots you're a jerk. A big mean jerk.

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