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Michael Jordan's trainer has program in place for Jordan to attempt comeback

(Kent Smith/Getty Images) Michael Jordan's longetime trainer said that even at 50 years old, Jordan would be the best player on the Bobcats, the team he currently owns. (Kent Smith/Getty Images)

Michael Jordan's upcoming 50th birthday has brought the basketball legend back into the spotlight and even fueled speculation that he could attempt a comeback.

If Jordan chooses to go that route, longtime trainer Tim Grover is prepared to help. Grover has done extensive research to put together a program for Jordan to follow should he attempt a return to the NBA, according to Yahoo! Sports' Adrian Wojnarowski, and believes that Jordan "is still the best player on the Charlotte Bobcats."

The soon-to-be 50-year-old beat 19-year-old No. 2 draft pick Michael Kidd-Gilchrist in a game of one-on-one last month, according to CSNHouston.com's Dave Zangaro.

Jordan's duties as owner of the Bobcats are the main obstacles preventing him from planning a comeback, Grover told Yahoo! Sports. But Grover also said that if he ever gets the call, he will "be ready for him."

Fifty pages inside a binder sit on Grover's desk inside his suburban Chicago home now, information and studies and research and innovations into regenerating the muscle fibers and anti-aging advances and nutrition. From his trips to Europe and Asia and the Far East, Grover has incorporated a small library of intelligence – backed with the most intimate knowledge of Jordan's body and mind and drive – to create a program that awaits the comeback of all comebacks at 50 years old.

In his last comeback attempt at 38-40-years-old, Jordan averaged more than 20 points per game over two seasons with the Washington Wizards. Grover believes that the Hall of Famer could pull off a similar feat a decade later.

"His skill level was so superior to everyone else, his understanding of the commitment to the task so different, I absolutely believe [Jordan] playing again at 50 is obtainable," Grover said. "Of course, things have been diminished away from the game so long, but even with what's diminished by age, by not playing, I still think he's superior to a lot of the players out there now."
Jordan has been working out more frequently in hopes of shedding pounds to reach his former playing weight of 218, as detailed in Wright Thompson's ESPN.com feature.
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