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NCAA opposes NBA's 'one-and-done' rule

The NCAA spent $150,000 on lobbyists last year. (Allison Joyce/Getty Images) Many NCAA officials, including president Mark Emmert, want the one-and-done rule changed. (Allison Joyce/Getty Images)

NCAA president Mark Emmert said the rule that allows college basketball players to enter the NBA draft after one season needs revision.

In 2005, the NBA - along with the league's union - passed a rule requiring that players be at least 19 years old and one year removed from their high school class's graduation to declare for the draft. Players could no longer enter the league straight out of high school, and most went to college instead (with a few exceptions, such as Brandon Jennings, who spent a year playing overseas).

Many NCAA coaches and officials have said they would prefer players be required to stay for longer than a season.

"As everyone knows here, this is enshrined in the labor agreement between the NBA and the NBA players, and not a rule that we have control over," Emmert said, via the Associated Press. "I think everybody here knows my position on it."

Big 12 commissioner Bob Bowlsby says he is in favor of Major League Baseball's rule. Players can sign out of high school, but if they don't, they must wait until after their junior years to be drafted again.

"I like the baseball rule. I like, 'Draft 'em out of high school or leave 'em go until after their junior year,'" Bowlsby said.  "And I also think the NBA and NFL need to have some legitimate developmental program to allow people who don't want to go to college to go develop their skills."

Kentucky head coach John Calipari has sent 13 "one-and-done" players to the NBA since the rule was established under the league's 2005 collective bargaining agreement, including No. 1 overall picks Derrick Rose, John Wall and Anthony Davis.

"Every player that I've recruited, and they will tell you, I say the same thing: 'Don't plan on coming to school for one year. You make a huge mistake,'" Calipari said. "But if after one year, you have options, that will be up to you and your family."

"Enjoy the college experience, enjoy the college environment, because the rest of it is work. It's not about family, it's about business. So enjoy it."

HAMILTON: NCAA president: Union model a ‘grossly inappropriate solution’ to problem

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