NEW YORK -- Earlier this week, SI.com asked readers to submit their questions for Andy Roddick. Roddick, who has been gearing up for the U.S. Open, received hundreds of inquiries. At last night's BNP Paribas Taste of Tennis event in Manhattan, he stepped away from the grill to answer your questions.

What are your top goals from now until you retire? -- Jason Mauss of Surprise, Ariz.

Well, I'd love to win another Slam. I want to keep being successful in Davis Cup and in playing for the U.S.. If I can just stay consistent, that's what I want to do.

You seem to sweat more than most other players on tour. Do you have to regrip during matches or do you just switch to new racquets? --Hunter Haisten, Chelsea, Ala.

There's a lot of toweling off in between points, and a lot of trying to hydrate before matches. Unfortunately, that's something that's out of my control, so you kind of just deal.

Your 2003 Australian Open quarterfinal against Younes El Aynaoui is often regarded as one of the greatest tennis matches in history. What is the best tennis match you've ever seen? -- Gregory Mathews, Milwaukee

I think it just happened. I think it was Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer at Wimbledon this year. It was amazing. It seemed like it was all anyone was talking about for a couple of days, which was nice, considering it happened in Europe. Coming home and hearing people excited about it was a great thing.

What do you think of Rafael Nadal as the new top-ranked player in the world? Do you think he'll outlast Federer's consecutive 237 weeks at the top? --Aida Mendoza, Manila, Philippines

No. To say anybody would be No. 1 for four years is a tall ask. Rafa, if anyone, is certainly capable. I definitely am happy for him and I think he deserves it. He'd been No. 2 for a while and you know had had a better career than a lot of guys who'd achieved No. 1, including myself. He deserved a spot, and I think everyone's generally pretty happy for him.

How do you think getting married will affect you? --Clifton LaSalle, Scituate, Mass.

[Laughs] I'm really happy in my personal life right now. It's nice to have something solid and I see that can only help as far as my job goes.

Andy, what's your take on the Blake/Gonzalez controversy at the Olympics? What would you have done if you were in either guy's shoes? --Daniel Koontz, Bloomingdale, NJ

I've given away matches before, reversing calls against myself, so I can understand both sides, but I know Fernando said he doesn't know if the ball hit his racquet or not, I feel like that's something you would know one way or the other. If I stepped on your foot, you would feel it. I can understand the frustration, but it is what it is.

Much was made of Phelps' expansive diet at the Olympics. Do you eat differently during a tournament? -- Mia, Washington, D.C.

No. I don't spend 36 hours in a pool a week either. [Laughs] I think if you start eating well during a tournament, it's probably too late. It becomes more of a lifestyle as opposed to when you're playing a tournament. You pretty much have to eat well all the time.

You've lost some weepers in finals in your career, notably to the Fed Express. What one match's outcome would you most want to change? --Jonathan Scott, Indianapolis

It's tough. I would take any of the three Grand Slam finals I've lost to him. In 2004 at Wimbledon, I felt like I was the closest. Probably the one I think about the most. I felt like I was getting the best of him, and then the rain delay happened and it kind of changed the momentum of the match. That's probably the one I would want back.

It's impossible not to think of those matches. When one of your dreams is staring you in the face and you're this close, and you don't get it, you think about it. I realize my worst day is a lot of people's best day, so I think it may be disrespectful to dwell on it too long. That being said, being a competitor, you want to play well, so I normally am pissed off for a few hours and then settle down a little bit.

Can you find the strength within yourself to not break racquets anymore and give them to underprivileged children? --Tamille Hawkins, Washington, D.C.

That's a good question. To be fair, a lot of the racquets that I break do go to various charities. For some reason, people actually like the broken ones sometimes. Two birds, one stone. I give them all away. I don't really have much use for them after the fact.

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