Report: Top Recruit Allegedly Took $100K Bribe To Attend Louisville

An Adidas executive allegedly wanted to pay $100,000 to the family of a top-rated prospect to represent Adidas once he went pro.
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The FBI's investigation into a college basketball corruption scheme alleges that a top-rated prospect took a $100,000 bribe to join the University of Louisville, reportsThe Courier Journal.

An Adidas executive allegedly wanted to pay $100,000 to the family of a top-rated prospect to represent Adidas once he went pro. In one of the three criminal complaints released, the player was only identified as "Player-10."

The prospect supposedly committed to the University on or about June 3, "or almost immediately after the illicit bribe scheme." The only prospect who fits this description is Brian Bowen, who is a freshman at Louisville this season. 

Bowen, a five-star small forward out of La Lumiere School in La Porte, Ind., was the No. 2 prospect in Indiana and No. 19 prospect in the nation, according to 247sports. 

"I don't know anything about that," Bowen's mother, Carrie Malecke, told the Courier-Journal. "I don't know anything about that. I'm not aware of anything like that. Not me. I had no idea."

Four College Assistant Coaches Charged in Corruption Scheme

On Tuesday, Oklahoma State assistant Lamont Evans, Auburn assistant Chuck Person, Emanuel "Book" Richardson of Arizona and USC assistant Tony Bland and six others were each charged in the corruption and fraud scheme.

No one from Louisville has been charged, but the investigation is ongoing. 

Louisville's head basketball coach Rick Pitino had already been suspended by the NCAA for the first five Atlantic Coast Conference games this season, following an investigation into the program's basketball escorts case.

The university released a statement Tuesday. 

“UofL is committed to ethical behavior and adherence to NCAA rules; any violations will not be tolerated,” Louisville interim president Gregory Postel said in a statement. “We will cooperate fully with any law enforcement or NCAA investigation into the matter.”