By 90Min
March 23, 2018

With Liverpool midfielder Emre Can seemingly edging closer and closer to the exit door, the Reds have been linked with a number of potential replacements in recent weeks. 

The Reds are apparently currently leading the race to sign £50m-rated Napoli midfielder Jorginho this summer, with Arsenal and Manchester United said to also be interested in the Italy international. 

However, it turns out that then-manager Brendan Rodgers was apparently an admirer of the midfielder back in 2013, when he could have signed him for a fraction of his current valuation.

Marco Luzzani/GettyImages

Back in December of 2013, the Metro reported that Liverpool were interested in signing Hellas Verona midfielder Jorginho. Rodgers was looking for players who could help lighten the burden on captain Steven Gerrard and could have sealed a deal for the Brazilian-born Jorginho for as little as £15m. 

Jorginho instead signed for Napoli in January 2014, and has gone on to make over 150 appearances for the Serie A title challengers. Jorginho also had instant success in Naples and won the Coppa Italia and Supercoppa Italiana in his first season at the club. 

Francesco Pecoraro/GettyImages

Had Liverpool signed the Italy international all those years ago, would their fortunes be different? The report from the Metro states that Rodgers had Jorginho in mind to help cover for the ageing Steven Gerrard. That season would become the setting for Liverpool's infamous title collapse, which saw them miss out on the trophy to Manchester City. 

Liverpool will now have to pay as much as £35m more to sign Jorginho this summer compared to 2013. Midfield seems to be an area the Reds are focused on bolstering as they have also been linked with Leicester City's Wilfred Ndidi recently. The Reds also have the arrival of Naby Keita to look forward, who will arrive in Anfield from RB Leipzig at the end of the season.

You May Like

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)