Pep Guardiola Defiant as Mourinho, Klopp, Rivals Blast Manchester City's UCL Ban Appeal Win

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Following Manchester City's successful appeal to the Court of Arbitration for Sport over allegedly breaching financial fair play rules, boss Pep Guardiola demanded an apology after Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp and Tottenham head coach Jose Mourinho were among those blasting the decision.

The club was originally banned from European competition for two years, but that ruling was overturned and their original €30 million fine was reduced to €10 million.

The decision allows City to compete in the Champions League next season, and some have already predicted they'll make a run at capturing the Premier League title over Liverpool. While Klopp welcomes City in competition, the Reds' boss expressed his disappointment over the ban appeal.

"From a personal point of view, I'm happy that City can play Champions League next year because if I think about the league if City has 10-12 games less, I don't think anybody has a chance," Klopp said, per ESPN.

"But I don't think yesterday was a good day for football. FFP is a good idea. It is there for protecting teams and the competition so nobody overspends."

Mourinho attacked the decision and said UEFA's FFP rules are "gone." 

"In relation to the decision, in any case, it's a disgraceful decision," he said. "If Man City is not guilty of it, to be punished by some million is a disgrace. If you're not guilty you're not punished," he said, per ESPN. "In the other way, if you're guilty you should be banned. So it's also a disgraceful decision. In any case, it's a disaster."

While discussing rumors of a Saudi-backed takeover at Newcastle, Mourinho addressed how FFP rules can benefit them.

"And I believe that next season, with no FFP, maybe a new owner goes there and spends lots of money, gives him even better conditions. I truly believe FFP is gone. So new owners, probably they will have this feeling of the circus opened the door, so let's go and enjoy it."

Following the widespread judgment of City's ban appeal, manager Pep Guardiola launched his own attack on critics and demanded an apology.

"We should be apologized to," Guardiola said, according to ESPN.

"We have the right to defend ourselves when we believe what we have done is correct. Three [CAS] judges said this. It was a good day for football as we play with the same rules as all the clubs in Europe. If we had broken the rules we'd be banned.

"The people [who] say we cheated were lying and the presumption of innocence wasn't there. Of course, now we are incredibly happy because we can defend what we've done on the pitch."