2021 Masters DFS: Breaking Down the Top 60 Golfers

What is your game plan for the DraftKings Fantasy Golf Millionaire? For the 2021 Masters, go for the green with Shawn Childs
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Welcome to our golf daily game kit for the Masters. With an overall prize of $1,000,000 to this event's winner for a $10 entry, the casual fan can't let this opportunity slip by him.

Fantasy golf is an excellent experience for daily owners. It gives more length to their investment while providing endless moments of anxiety as each golfer beats the golf ball all over the course. You can imagine the immense pressure these players feel when they are in the heat of the battle.

This tournament by DraftKings.com will give you the same opportunity to be a star for a weekend while not seeing your knees wobble when trying to make a six-foot putt to save par.

The information in this format is geared to narrow down the player pool to create a winning opportunity. The Masters is a unique tournament as the field is smaller with some options having no chance at winning. The possible number of players playing on the weekend is shorter than most PGA events. There will be only 50 golfers making the cut (plus ties).

READ MORE: 2021 Masters Plays, Best Bets & Fades

To win the event, you will need to find the winner, plus every golfer will need to make the cut. There are too many combinations for someone to slip through the cracks.

Each Fantasy golf owner should be looking to find three or four key players to build their team. Ideally, you would like to identify the value plays with upside. Once you have your core, you may want to diversify your roster's backend to give yourself more options to make the cut and win a million dollars.

To win the Masters, a golfer will need to be long off the tee with accuracy. The best swing path is a long draw (power fade for a lefty). Placement with approach shots is essential to create makeable birdie opportunities. A stealth short game is a must, along with a hot putter.


2021 Masters Color-Coded Cheat Sheet

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Dustin Johnson ($11,500)

Mar 12, 2021; Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, USA; Dustin Johnson lines up his putt on the seventh green during the second round of The Players Championship golf tournament at TPC Sawgrass - Stadium Course.

Over the last six weeks in the United States, Johnson has only played in three events. He struggled in the WGC-Mexico Championship (54th) played in Florida with a dull finish in The Players Championship (48th) and a 1-1-1 showing in the WGC-Dell Technologies Match Play.

His last win came in the Covid delayed Masters in November. In his nine contests at Augusta, he's made the cut eight times, with his other top finishes coming in 2015 (6th), 2016 (4th), 2018 (10th), and 2019 (2nd). Overall at the Masters, Johnson is -35 over 38 rounds, with all of his success coming over the past five tournaments (-9, -1, -7, -12, and -20).

He ranks 8th on the PGA Tour in driving distance (313.3), with only 58.9 percent landing in the fairway (119h). Johnson currently sits in 14th place in strokes gained putting (-.182) with a 1.67 to 1 birdie to bogey ratio (34th).

Johnson isn’t in top form, but his resume at Augusta has been impressive over his last five events. He has an eagle swing on the Par 5s, which is an edge at the tournament. Johnson should be in the hunt, but I expect him to fall short of a victory based on his recent play unless his putter catches fire.

Jon Rahm ($11,000)

Rahm missed a golden opportunity last week in the Dell Match Play Championship. He was the highest-ranked player left in the quarter-finals in an upset-filled contest, but Rahm lost to the eventual runner-up Scottie Scheffler.

Over his six stroke-play tournaments on the PGA Tour in 2021, Rahm has four top 10s while being 60 under par over 24 rounds. His last win came in the BMW Championship in late August.

In his first four trips to the Masters, Rahm finished 27th, 4th, 9th, and 7th while being 28 under par over 16 rounds. His play at Augusta has been exceptional over the past three trips (-11, -10, and -10).

He has a big swing (306.1 – 23rd) with improvement in finding the fairway (61.9 percent – 82nd). His putter can get hot at times, but it has let him down in 2021 (122nd in strokes gained-putting - 0.007). Jon sits ninth on the PGA tour in birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.92).

Despite an underachieving feel this year, Rahm looks ready to make a significant push in this year’s Masters. He has all the tools to contend, but he can’t win without finding his putting stroke. I expect the stars to align on the second weekend in April.

Bryson DeChambeau ($10,800)

Before his early exit in the Dell Match Play Championship (1-2), DeChambeau picked up a win and a third in the Arnold Palmer Invitational and The Players Championship. Over his last 15 tournaments, he has two other wins (Rocket Mortgage and US Open).

As an amateur in 2016 at Augusta, DeChambeau finished in 21st with a score of plus five. Over the past three years, he placed 38th, 29th, and 34th while finishing three-under par over 12 rounds.

DeChambeau leads the PGA Tour in driving distance (302.8) with struggles in his accuracy (58.0 percent – 138th). His putter sits 38th in strokes gained putting (0.435). He has the fifth-best birdie-to-bogey ratio (2.05).

To be a winner at Augusta, DeChambeau needs to stay out of trouble with his driver. His length gives him an instant edge on five 5s, but he still needs to stick his approaches to create birdie chances. DeChambeau is getting closer to a Master’s title while still looking a year away from a legit chance at picking up a green jacket.

Justin Thomas ($10,600)

After two excellent final rounds (64-68) to win The Players Championship, Thomas lost his first two matches in the Dell Match Play Championship. He has one missed cut in his last 17 stroke-play events, which came after losing his grandfather in February. Thomas is 81 under over his previous 30 rounds with three other top-five finishes.

In his first Masters, Thomas shot 76, 73, 78, and 71 leading a 39th place finish (+10). He followed up with a 22nd in 2017 (+2), 17th in 2018 (-4), 12th in 2019 (-8), and 4th in 2020 (-12). His progression is getting closer to a threat at Augusta. Thomas is 24 under over his last 12 rounds at Augusta with five rounds in the 60s.

He currently sits 63rd in driving distance (300.4) with some struggles with his accuracy (58.8 – 123rd). Thomas is 54th in strokes gained putting (0.356) and second in birdie-to-bogey ratio (2.24).

There is no doubt Thomas will win a Masters before he hangs up his clubs. His progression at this event points to a top-three finish in 2021.

Rory McIlroy ($10,200)

McIlroy has been frustrating to watch this golf season. He already has two missed cuts with many rounds of ugliness. His game lacks a sense of urgency and the desire to be one of the greatest in the game.

In the Dell Match Play Championship, he went 1-0-1 after getting dusted in the first round. McIlroy hasn’t won in the US since October 31 in 2019 (WGC-HSBC Champions). He shot 76, 79, and 75 in his last three rounds in stroke-play events.

Despite the appearance of disaster, McIlroy has nine top 20s over his past 13 tournaments.

In 2015 at the Masters, he came off the pace to finish 4th (-12) after falling 12 shots behind Jordan Spieth after rounds one and two. It was his best Masters event in 12 tries. Last year McIlroy finished 11 under par for a 5th place finish, giving him six top 10s over his previous seven trips to Augusta. Overall, he has 46 rounds at Augusta with one missed cut while being 31 under par (-9 in 2018, -5 in 2019, and -11 in 2020).

He ranks 3rd in driving distance (319.1), but only 57.2 percent (148th) of his drives have hit the fairway. His putter has been ragged at this point of the year (105th – 0.040 strokes-gained). McIlroy fell to 48th in birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.56).

His winning resume at Augusta still isn’t enough for me to take him to the daily dance at DraftKings. McIlroy isn’t in form, and I don’t expect his light to shine bright enough to win this week.

Xander Schauffele: 'Unfair' That Everybody's Clubs Don't Get Checked

Xander Schauffele ($10,000)

Schauffele started the year with three top 5s (5th, 2nd, and 2nd), but his game has gone in the wrong direction since mid-February. He went from 15th to 39th to a missed cut before losing in a playoff to Scottie Scheffler to advance to the quarters at the Dell Match Play Championship.

His last win came at the Sentry Tournament of Champions in January of 2019.

In his three appearances at the Masters, Schauffele made the cut each time, with best play coming in 2019 (2nd) and 2020 (17th). He’s minus 19 over his last eight rounds.

He ranks 28th in driving distance (305.4), with some wildness in his direction off the tees (58.1 percent – 137th). His putter grades as a plus in strokes gained putting (0.759 – 9th) with success in his birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.86 – 13th).

Schauffele tends to fly under the radar when matched up with the top-tier golfers due to his lack of wins. He putts well with the length to take advantage of the par 5s. In the mix at the top end with favorable betting odds (22-1) at DraftKings.

Patrick Cantlay ($9,800)

Cantlay peaked in January when he shot 54 under par over 12 rounds, leading to a second and a third. He closed in the fourth round of The American Express with a 61 to fall a stroke short of a possible win. The following week at the AT&T Pebble Beach, Cantlay opened with 10 under par, but he failed to make a push over the next two rounds (73 and 70).

His play regressed at The Players Championship (missed cut) while losing to Brian Harman in a playoff to advance to the quarter-finals at the Dell Match Play Championship.

In his four trips to Augusta, Cantlay played well in 2019 (-10) and 2020 (-7), which led to a 9th and 17th place finish. He shot 64-68 on the weekend in 2019.

Cantlay fell to 67th in driving distance (300.1) with improvement in finding the fairway (61.3 percent – 87th). He sits 50th in strokes gained putting (0.376) and 3rd in birdie-to-bogey ratio (2.14).

He is a viable play at the Masters based on his pedigree, play, and overall skill set.

MORE MASTERS COVERAGE FROM SI

Collin Morikawa ($9,600)

After taking down the WGC-Mexico Championship in Florida, Morikawa played poorly in The Players Championship (41st) and the Dell Match Play (0-2-1).

Over his last 31 events, he has four wins and six other top 10 finishes. In his rookie appearance in the Masters in 2020, Morikawa placed 44th while shooting even par.

He ranks 124th in driving distance (293.9) with exceptional accuracy (69.6 – 9th). His downfall in many weeks is his putter's value (-.453 in strokes gained putting – 179th). Morikawa tends to minimize the damage in bad holes leading to the 16th best birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.83) on tour.

Great player, but he doesn’t look ready to take down a title at the Masters. He’ll give himself plenty of birdie chances while coming up short in his conversion rate.

Jordan Spieth has added a Presidents Cup berth to his record-setting rookie season. (Getty Images)

Jordan Spieth ($9,400)

In the summer of 2017, Spieth was on top of the golfing world after winning back-to-back events, with the latter being The Open Championship. It’s hard to believe he hasn’t won another event since.

His climb back up the World Golf rankings started in February when Spieth picked up a third and two fourths over four events. Over his last 24 rounds of stroke-play, he shot 70 or under 16 times. Unfortunately, his scoring average was only 72.6 on Sunday until he broke through with a 66 to win the Valero Texas Open. His win ended a four-year drought.

Last week in the Dell Match Play tournament, Spieth lost on the 18th hole in the round of 16 to Matt Kuchar after starting the event 2-0-1.

In his first five chances at the Masters, he has a win, two 2nds, a third, and one 11th place finish while being 39 strokes under par over 20 rounds. Spieth slipped to 21st in 2019 (-5) with further regression in 2020 (46th – +1).

Spieth ranks 99th in driving distance (296.6) with huge problems finding the fairway (50.0 percent – 204th). His putter continues to trail his early career success despite showing improvement (0.300 – 64th in strokes gained putting), leading to a low ranking in his birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.40 – 85th).

The best part about Spieth in 2021 is playing golf again. He’s hitting shots and not over-analyzing his swing. Even with an uptick in success this year, Spieth has plenty of work to do. He can’t win at Augusta without creating many birdie chances, which requires him to play from the fairway. Any investment in him is more on his resume at the Masters than his overall play this season. His victory the week before Augusta creates plenty of intrigue. 

Patrick Reed ($9,300)

Despite a win at the Farmers Insurance Open in late January, Reed has been up and down in 2021. He missed two of five cuts with a dull showing at the Dell Match Play event (1-1-1).

Over his first four trips to Augusta, Reed missed two cuts while being 27 strokes over par over 12 rounds. He broke through for a win in 2018 (-15), followed up by a 36th and 10th place finish over the past two seasons.

Reed is 182nd off the tees (287.4) with improvement in finding the fairway (64.5 percent – 53rd). His best edge comes with his putter (1st in strokes gained putting – 1.101). He sits 33rd in birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.68).

With a win under his belt at the Masters, Reed has the putter to add another green jacket. When in the hunt, he tends to rise in the big moments. The key for Reed is staying in contention until Sunday. In the mix at DraftKings at this salary level.

Brooks Koepka ($9,200)

Koepka came into February with three straight missed cuts. He came off the pace on Sunday (65) to steal the Waste Management Phoenix Open. One bad round led to a 38th place finish at The Genesis Invitational, followed up by a second in the WGC-Mexico Championship.

A right knee injury led to a WD in The Players Championship. Koepka had surgery in mid-March, putting his status in flux for the Masters.

In his first experience at Augusta in 2015, he shot even-par to finish in 33rd place with improvement in 2016 (21st) and 2017 (11th). After missing the Masters in 2018 with a wrist issue, Koepka played well in 2019 (2nd) and 2020 (7th) with seven rounds of 70 or less. Over 20 trips around the course, he is 18 under par.

Koepka is 17th on the PGA Tour in driving distance (308.2) with an uphill battle with his accuracy (54.3 percent - 178th). His putter has been impressive to start the year (0.778 – 7th in stroke gained putting), helping him to a 37th place ranking in birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.65).

If he were healthy, Koepka would be a top contender at the Masters while owning a history of playing well in major events. I'm going to fade even if he is cleared to play. 

Tony Finau ($9,100)

Over a six tournament stretch from December through February, Finau went 75 under par over 24 rounds, leading to a pair of seconds and a fourth. A lousy opening day (78) led to a missed cut at The Player Championship. Finau went 1-1-1 at the Dell Match Play event, leaving him short of a top 16 opportunity.

He played well in his first trip to Augusta in 2018, which led to a 10th place finish thanks to two competitive rounds (68 and 66). Finau posted a third round of 64 in 2019, helping him finish fifth (-11). Last year, he slipped to 38th (-1). Over 12 days of action at the Masters, Finau is 19 under par.

Finau sits 37th in driving distance (304.2), with plenty of risk in his ability to keep the ball on the short grass (56.5 percent – 156th). He ranks 69th in stroke gained putting (0.258) and 20th in birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.81).

There is a lot to like here, except for his ability to win. Finau's last PGA victory came in 2016. He does have 31 top 10s over his previous 85 tournaments. I view him as a board dog rather than an anchor stud to build your teams around at DraftKings.

webb simpson

Webb Simpson ($9,100)

Simpson picked up a fourth and sixth-place finish over his first four starts in 2021 while going 55 under over 16 rounds. His swing went off track at The Players Championship (MC – 71-75), with a quiet showing at the Dell Match Play (1-1-1).

He has made the cut only four times in his first seven events at the Masters, with his best finish coming in 2015 (28th). Simpson played well in his last three tournaments (20th, 5th, and 10th) at Augusta while going 22 under par.

Simpson is 129th in driving distance (292.9) with success hitting the fairway (71.4 percent – 5th). His putter remains one of the best in the game (13th in strokes gained putting – 0.676) while leading the PGA in birdie-to-bogey ratio (2.26).

He is an underrated player who stays out of trouble with success on the greens. Simpson will be challenged to match the top players on par 5s, which is an area needed to win. I expect him to make the cut and contend for a top 10 finish.

Tyrrell Hatton ($8,900)

In his first start on the European Tour, Hatton won the Abu Dhabi HSBC Championship. He shot 70 or under in nine of his next 12 rounds to place 22nd, 6th, and 22nd). A pair of 77s at the Arnold Palmer Invitational led to him finishing 21st, followed by a missed cut at The Players Championship and emptiness at the Dell Match Play (0-2-1).

His play at Augusta has been unimpressive in four appearances (two missed cuts, 44th, and 56th) while being 25 over par over 12 rounds. Hatton has never shot under 72 at the Masters.

He sits 115th in driving distance (294.7) with reasonable success hitting fairways (64.8 – 51st). Hatton putts well (40th in strokes gained – 0.428). He ranks 48th in birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.56).

I don't see a pulse in his game at the Masters, which tells me to leave this club in the bag when playing at DraftKings.

Lee Westwood ($8,800)

After a relatively quiet start to his year in Europe (62nd, 17th, and 50th), Westwood made his trek to play in the United States. His game was unimpressive at the WGC-Mexico Championship (61st) held in Florida. The following two weeks, Westwood brought back memories of yesteryear when battled for a pair of runner-up finishes at the Arnold Palmer Invitational and The Players Championship. A letdown was expected at the Honda Classic (MC) while losing in the Round of 16 in the Dell Match Play event.

Westwood returns to Augusta for his 20th chance at the Masters. He has six impressive showings (2nd, 2nd, 3rd, 6th, 7th, and 8th) while being +28 over 70 rounds. Westwood played on the weekend in his last 12 appearances.

He ranks 111th in driving distance (295.2) with below-par accuracy (59.4 – 108th). His success of late falls on the value of his putter (0.409 – 44th in strokes gained). Westwood will make some mistakes, leading to weakness in his birdie-to-bogey ratio (0.97 – 195th).

His salary is much too high to ride at DraftKings this week. His experience should help him make the cut, but Westwood doesn't have a top 10 feel, which is almost required for his price point.

PGA Viktor Hovland

Viktor Hovland ($8,700)

Hovland picked up a win in early December, setting up an excellent start to 2021 (31st, 2nd, 5th, and 2nd). Over this stretch, he went 62 under par over 20 rounds. After a great start at the Arnold Palmer Invitational (69-68), his swing fell out of form (77-78). Hovland missed the cut the following week at The Players Championship while failing to gain any momentum at the Dell Match Play (1-2).

In his only appearance in 2019 at Augusta, he shot 72, 71, 71, and 71, leading to a 32nd place finish.

Hovland is 53rd in driving distance (301.6) and 79th in his accuracy (62.2). His putter sits just above the league average (0.113 – 90th in strokes gained). He sits 25th in birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.74). 

Based on salary, upside, and his first success at Augusta, Hovland is a live second-tier option at DraftKings. 

Sungjae Im ($8,600)

Over the first three months, Im has already played in 10 tournaments. He made the cut each week, but his top finish (5th) came in the year's first event. I'm in 76 under par over his 36 stroke-play rounds. In the Dell Match Play Championship, he went 1-2.

I'm placed second (-15) in his rookie appearance at the Masters in 2020. He shot 70 or under in all four days.

His driver ranks 87th in driving distance (297.4) but 7th in hitting the fairway (69.9). It is one of the better putters (0.499 – 30th in strokes gained) on tour. He also grades well in birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.86).

Im won't draw a lot of attention based on his one career win over 79 tournaments, but I can't dismiss his success at the Masters last year. He should be a perfect fit on a team with a balance of mid-level options.

Daniel Berger ($8,500)

Since the Houston Open in October of 2019, Berger played on the weekend 20 of 22 events, leading to two wins and eight other top 10s. He won the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am in the second week of February. Berger slipped to 35th in the WGC two weeks later with a good showing at The Players Championship (9th) and the Dell Match Play event (2-1 – lost in a playoff to make the round of 16).

Berger didn't qualify for the Masters in 2019 and 2020. He made the cut in his first three appearances (10th, 27th, and 32nd) while shooting one round in the 60s. Over his 12 days in Augusta, Berger is five strokes over par.

He averages 297.9 yards per drive (81st), with 63.9 percent (59th) landing on the short grass. Berger has a stealth putter (0.607 – 19th in strokes gained) while being one of the best in the game, avoiding disaster holes (1.95 in birdie-to-bogey ratio – 6th).

Berger is a much better player since his last trip to the Masters. He should be a lock to play all four days while almost being overlooked at DraftKings based on his salary. His floor should be a top 15 finish with the game to contend on Sunday.

Rookie Scottie Scheffler is out of the U.S. Open after testing positive for COVID-19.

Scottie Scheffler ($8,400)

Despite not having a career win in 48 starts on the PGA Tour, Scheffler is a rising star. He had his highest finish (2nd) in the Dell Match Play Championship in the last week in March. Over his other seven stroke-play events this season, Scheffler has three missed cuts with a 5th and a 7th. 

In his first experience at Augusta in 2020, he placed 19th with no round over par. Scheffler posted a minus-six while posting a 68 on the second day.

He ranks 33rd in driving distance (304.6), with a high level of success hitting the fairway (67.0 percent – 25th). His next growth area needs to come from his putter (0.109 – 91st in strokes gained). Scheffler sits 13th in birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.86).

I don't expect a win, but Scheffler should improve on his first experience at the Masters.

Hideki Matsuyama ($8,300)

The last win by Matsuyama came at the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational in early August of 2017. Between 2015 and 2017, he won five of 45 events while looking to be on a stud path. Matsuyama doesn't have a win over his past 80 tournaments.

He missed the cut in two of his last four stroke-play events, plus a 1-2 showing at the Dell Match Play. His top two results (15th and 18th) in 2021 came over the previous six weeks.

Matsuyama made the cut in eight of nine events at Augusta with three strong outings (5th, 7th, 9th, and 11th). Over 34 days at the Masters, he is 11 shots under par with six rounds under 70. 

His driver lost about 10 yards since 2019 (297.2 – 90th) while failing to gain an edge in accuracy (62.6 percent – 71st). Matsuyama continues to battle his putter (-0.307 – 170th in strokes gained). He has 206 birdies and 130 bogeys (1.58 ratio – 44th).

I'd like to see growth in his results before investing in Matsuyama in a major event. The best part about his game is his ball-striking with irons. He made a swing change this year to remove a pause, which hasn't emerged as an asset at this point of the season. I'm going to pass even with an attractive salary at DraftKings.

Cameron Smith ($8,200)

Smith only has two wins in his PGA career over 141 tournaments, but his game has been improved over the last nine months. He made the cut in 15 of his previous 16 events with a second and two fourths. Over his 34 rounds in stroke-play, Smith is 82 under par with 23 scores in the 60s.

His play has been up and down over four events at the Masters. He played on the weekend each time while succeeding in 2018 (5th) and 2020 (2nd). Last year he shot under 70 all four days. Overall, Smith is seven under par over 16 trips around Augusta.

Smith ranks 95th in driving distance (296.8) while ranking poorly in his accuracy (56.6 percent – 154th). His ability to make putts (0.607 – 19th in strokes gained) gives him a chance to win when keeping the ball in play. Smith has the 10th best birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.90).

His overall game is a step below the best players, but Smith continues to develop. I expect him to steal a major title at some point in his career, thanks to his putter. He has a favorable salary, which gives him a chance to be on the million-dollar ticket at DraftKings.

Matthew Fitzpatrick ($8,100)

Despite never winning on the PGA Tour, Fitzpatrick flashed a much higher ceiling since arriving in the United States in 2021. He went 2-1 in the Dell Match Play event, which wasn't good enough to make it to the quarter-finals. Fitzpatrick finished 5th, 11th, 10th, and 9th while going 28 under par over 16 rounds over his previous four tournaments.

He'll be making his seventh appearance at the Masters. After missing the cut in 2014, Fitzpatrick placed seventh in 2016 with a score of even par. His play has been erratic over his last 16 rounds (+3) in Augusta with unimpressive results (32nd, 38th, 21st, and 46th).

Fitzpatrick lacks length off the tee (287.1 yards – 183rd) while making up for this shortfall with his ability to hit the fairway (65.5 percent – 40th) and success with his putter (0.529 – 27th in strokes gained). He ranks 51st in birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.55). 

Part of me believes Fitzpatrick is somewhat due at the Masters, which is supported by his recent play. On the flip side, his ownership may be higher than his actual value. Worth a dart, but I won't fight to get him in my lineups.

tommy-fleetwood-nike-golf-clubs-discontinued.jpg

Tommy Fleetwood ($8,000)

Fleetwood shot under 69 in seven of his first 12 rounds in Europe in 2021, but he only managed a 7th, 17th, and 26th place finishes. His play was flat at the WGC-Mexico Championship played in Florida (44th) while also missing The Player Championship cut. Fleetwood flashed in the Arnold Palmer Invitational (10th) and Dell Match Play (top eight).

He struggled in 2014 at Augusta (78-74), leading to an early exit. Over the past three seasons, Fleetwood went 12 under par with a 17th, 36th, and 19th. 

His driver sits 70th in distance (299.6) with a slightly low value in his accuracy (61.6 percent – 84th). Fleetwood has battled the putter (-0.207 – 155th in strokes gained). He only has 23 more birdies than bogeys over 33 rounds in the US.

There's more in the tank, but Fleetwood isn't on top of his game. His uptick in results last week might be just enough for him to unlock his missing link to success. Call him a maybe if you are shopping at this salary level. 

Sergio Garcia ($7,900)

After winning the Masters in 2017, Garcia fell out of form on the PGA Tour over the next three seasons (no wins and one top-three over 42 events). He won the Sanderson Farms Championship last October while playing well in The Players Championship (9th) and Dell Match Play (top 8) this season.

He failed to qualify for an appearance at Augusta in 2020 while failing to make the cut in 2018 (+15) and 2019 (+4) after his title. Garcia played in the 21 straight Masters starting in 1999, leading to three other top 10s (2002 – 8th, 2004 – 4th, and 2013 – 8th). Overall, he is 68 strokes over par in his 70 rounds with seven missed cuts.

Garcia continues to bomb his driver (308.6 – 15th) with only tour average control hitting the fairways (59.3 – 110th). More times than not, his putter lets him down (-0.570 – 190th in strokes gained). Despite his wildness and shaky flat stick, he does rank well in birdie-to-bogey ratio (24th – 1.75).

His game invites risk/reward. Garcia doesn’t look to have the required form or tools to push for a top 10 finish at the Masters, which is almost required based on his salary at DraftKings. I’ll fade him this week while understanding a Sunday battle with him on the leaderboard would be fun to watch.

Golf Clash - Bubba Watson - Sports Illustrated (Zoom).00_02_54_01.Still002

Bubba Watson ($7,800)

Watson picked up three wins in the 2017-2018 season, which led to over $5.7 million in winnings. He’s been skunked from a title since June of 2018 (58 tournaments). In 2021, Watson had three missed cuts with no impact in his two other stroke-play events (22nd and 54th). He lost in the round of 16 at the Dell Match Play event.

He won the Masters in 2012 and 2014 with respectable showings in 2018 (5th) and 2019 (12th). Watson played on the weekend in 11 of his 12 appearances at Augusta. Over 46 rounds, he is even par with 12 scores in the 60s.

Watson sits 30th in driving distance (305.0) with struggles with his accuracy (59.9 – 102nd). His putter is one notch below Sergio Garcia (-0.571 – 191st in strokes gained). He has 109 birdies and 88 bogeys on the year (1.24 ratio – 131st).

I can’t see the switch turning on for Watson at Augusta, even with a pair of wins in his career. He lacks confidence on the greens while creating too much disaster when his tee shots are offline.

Paul Casey ($7,700)

Over his first four events in the United States this season, Casey finished 8th, 5th, 10th, and 5th while going 42 under par over 16 rounds. He won the Omega Dubai Desert Classic in Europe in late January with a solid showing the following week (12th). Casey hasn’t missed the cut over his previous 13 tournaments on the PGA Tour. Last week he went 1-1-1 at the Dell Match Play.

Casey played on the weekend in 10 of his 14 trips at the Masters with five top 10s (2004 – 6th, 2007 – 10th, 2015 – 6th, 2016 – 4th, and 2017 – 6th). Last year he placed 38th with a score of minus one. Overall, Casey is 23 strokes over par at the Augusta over 48 rounds.

He ranks 49th in driving distance (302.1) while putting the ball in play 63.4 percent of the time (64th). Casey has been putting much better this season (0.224 – 74th in strokes gained). His birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.67) is the 34th best on tour.

It’s been a couple of seasons since Casey played well at Augusta. His game looks to be in top form while having plenty of experience and success at the Masters. His salary looks favorable, especially when staring at his run from 2015 to 2017. Casey should be a popular option at the price level. He’s looking for his first major win at age 44.

Adam Scott ($7,600)

Despite making the cut over his previous 13 tournaments, Scott doesn’t have a finish inside the top 10. He has one win (2020 Genesis Open) since March of 2016. Over his last 16 rounds, Scott shot even par with five rounds under 70.

Last year at the Master, he came in 34th (-2). He has a win and a second-place finish plus three other top 10s in 19 contests at Augusta while making the cut in 17 events, including the last 11. Overall in his career at the Masters, Scott is plus 17 over 72 rounds.

Scott has plenty of length off the tees (307.7 – 19th) with risk too many times finding the fairway (53.4 – 186th). His putter has been much better this year (57th in strokes gained – 0.341), but he needs to improve his birdie-bogey ratio (1.28 – 116th).

I expect him to play on the weekend, but I only see a top 30 player at best. To win a million dollars at DraftKings, you need the winner, and the other five golfers need to finish in the top 15. More of a fade than a chase, even with a reasonable salary.

Aug 6, 2020; San Francisco, California, USA; Jason Day hits his tee shot on the 11th hole during the first round of the 2020 PGA Championship golf tournament at TPC Harding Park.

Jason Day ($7,500)

Day hasn’t won a tournament since the Farmers Insurance Open in January of 2018. The following week, he finished second, which was his last top-three finish as well. Day has 16 top 10s over his previous 52 events. He made the cut over his past four tournaments (7th, 18th, 31st, and 35th) while going 1-2 at the Dell Match Play.

In his 10 chances at the Masters, Day finished second (2011), third (2013), and fifth (2019) while withdrawing from the 2012 event due to a wrist issue. Overall, he is 20 under par over 35 rounds at Augusta.

Day is 62rd in driving distance (300.6) on the PGA Tour, with 59.9 percent (100th) finding the short grass. The missing link in his game so far in 2021 is his putter's value (0.069 – 98th in strokes gained). He has 158 birdies and 110 bogeys over 46 rounds (1.44 ratio – 74th).

I’m not excited to roster Day this week, but he doesn’t look far off with improvement on the greens. For comparison, his salary was $9,800 in 2018.

Louis Oosthuizen ($7,500)

Oosthuizen tends to be a streaky player with occasional runs at championships. He’s never won an event in the US while owning one major title (Open Championship – 2010). Oosthuizen made the cut in 14 of his last 15 events on the PGA Tour, with his top finish in 2021 coming in the WGC-Mexico Championship played in Florida (6th).

In his first five trips to the Masters, Oosthuizen failed to play on the weekend four times. His best finish at Augusta came in 2012 (2nd) with a score of -10. Overall, he’s 10 strokes over par over 40 rounds while showing improvement over the previous three years (-15).

Oosthuizen is 90th in driving distance (297.2) with above-average accuracy (63.0 percent – 68th). His putter has saved him so far this season (1.037 – 3rd in strokes gained), creating plenty of birdie chances (45th in birdie-to-bogey ratio – 1.57).

I only see a tweener here. Oosthuizen has a chance to finish inside the top 25, but it may not be enough to be on the winning ticket at DraftKings.

Joakim Niemann ($7,400)

Over the first two events in 2021, Niemann shot 45 under par with a pair of runner-up finishes. His play hasn’t been the same after a five-week layoff (43rd, 28th, 29th, 25th, and 1-0-2 in the Dell Match Play). He played on the weekend in each of his last 13 stroke-play contests.

In his first and only appearance in the Masters in 2018, Niemann shot nine over par, leading to an early exit.

He has the ninth-best driving distance (321.7), with some work needed in his accuracy (60.9 – 93rd). Niemann moved to 37th in strokes gained putting (0.436), pushing him to sixth in birdie-to-bogey rate (1.95).

At age 23, his game is built to be a stud with a chance to win multiple majors. When on his game, Niemann will attack flags with the ability to convert on the green. His salary is well below his ceiling while looking to be much better in his second trip to Augusta. Close to an all-in play as I expect a minimum of a 15th place finish.

Abraham Ancer plays his shot from the 14th tee during the final round of The Masters golf tournament at Augusta National GC.

Abraham Ancer ($7,400)

When making the cut in his last eight completed stroke-play tournaments, Ancer finished 13th, 12th, 17th, 5th, 18th, and 22nd while being 65 strokes under par. He’s still looking for his first PGA win. Ancer lost in a playoff after posting a 2-1 record in the Dell Match Play.

In his rookie showing at Augusta, he finished 13th (-8) while shooting under 70 over the first three rounds (68, 67, and 69).

His driver (290.2 – 161st) is well below the top players in the game. Ancer makes up for this shortfall by placing the second-most balls in the fairway (72.6 percent). He is only league average on the greens (0.023 – 111th in strokes gained putting). Surprisingly, his birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.82) is the 18th best.

I’m intrigued for sure, but I question whether his putter will hold up at Augusta. Ancer is a 50/50 option to finish in the top 25 based on his last 34 tournaments. If the shoe fits, he should be a rotational filler with sneaky upside.

Will Zalatoris ($7,300)

Zalatoris continues to pile up made cuts (nine in a row) in his rookie season on the PGA Tour. He finished 7th, 10th, and 15th in his best outings over this span while going 52 strokes under par over 36 rounds. In the Dell Match Play event, Zalatoris went 1-1-1, which fell short of making it to the weekend.

He’ll be teeing it up for the first time at Augusta.

His driver has plenty of distance (307.9 – 18th), but Zalatoris battles his placement (173rd in his accuracy – 54.9) and his putter (0.029 – 107th in strokes gained). His birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.62) ranks 41st.

He has talent and upside to his game. I’m concerned with some disaster holes when his drives are off-target and his ability to convert when out of position on the greens. Zalatoris is a wild card while also possibly being a trap.

Harry English ($7,300)

Over the final four months of 2020, English was on top of his game, leading to three top 10s (4th, 5th, and 6th) and a 12th place finish at the Tour Championship. He parlayed his success to a win at the Sentry Tournament of Champions in the first event in 2021. His play slipped to 32nd, MC, MC, 66th, and 26th in his next five contests. English went 1-2 in the Dell Match Play.

In his two appearances at the Masters in 2014 and 2016, he went 17 over par over six rounds.

English continues to fade in the driver distance rankings (102nd – 296.4). He does grade well in his ability to find the short grass (65.3 percent – 43rd). His putter sits in 35th in strokes gained (0.442), with success in his birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.88 – 12th).

He’s out of form, but English has been a much better player over the last two seasons (12 top 10s and 19 top 25s over 34 events). When I see a 79, 78, and 80 over his previous 12 stroke-play rounds, I have to put him in the avoid column and let him beat me. 

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Justin Rose ($7,200)

From the fall of 2019 to 2021, Rose lost about a stroke off each round from his success over the previous three years. His downturn in play led to no wins and only one top-three over 20 tournaments. In his two events in the US this season, he finished 5th with a DNF with a back issue. Rose missed The Players Championship with his injury. Over four starts in Europe, he placed 57th, 35th, 2nd, and 54th.

In his career at Augusta, Rose played on the weekend in 14 of his 15 trips with four other top 10s (10th – 2016, 2nd - 2015, 8th - 2012, and 5th - 2007). He's 15 under par over 58 rounds at the Masters, with his best success coming since 2015 (-29 over 22 days of action).

Rose is 71st in driving distance (299.4) while struggling to find the short grass (114th – 59.2 percent). He ranks 71st in stroke gained putting (0.235) while picking up 99 birdies and 77 bogeys (1.29 ratio – 111th).

He expects to be ready for the Masters. It will be almost a month since his back issue. Rose has a favorable salary when considering his previous ceiling. I can’t see him flipping a switch to win after having no competitive rounds since early March.

Billy Horschel ($7,200)

Horschel already has two impressive tournaments this season (2nd at the WGC-Mexico Championship played in Florida and a win at the Dell Match Play Championship). Over seven stroke-play events in 2021, he has two missed cuts and one other top 10.

His play has been suspect over six tournaments at the Masters (37th, MC, 17th, MC, 56th, and 38th). Horschel has never broken 70 while being 29 strokes over par over his 20 trips around Augusta.

He ranks 128th in driving distance (293.1), with success keeping the ball in play (65.3 percent – 44th). Horschel sits 60th in strokes gained putting (0.328) and 54th in his birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.54).

He has two wins over his previous 88 tournaments, 22 top 10s, and 39 top 25s finishes. His lack of success at the Masters would push me elsewhere to find value. I expect a letdown after his big win. On the flip side, Horschel may be due for a competitive four days at Augusta.

Matt Wolff ($7,100)

Wolff came into 2021 with high hopes of a big season after two top threes in 11 events last year. He has been out of form in his six tournaments (40th, MC, 36th, 64th, MC, and 1-1-1 at the Dell Match Play). In the WGC-Mexico Championship played in Florida, Wolff opened with a pair of 83s.

In his first appearance in the Masters in 2020, he shot 70-77, leading to an early shower.

His driver has plenty of distance (314.6 yards – 5th), but Wolff has been one of the worst players on tour, hitting the fairway (50.2 percent – 203rd). Surprisingly, he ranks 69th in strokes gained putting (0.258) while picking up 138 birdies and 112 bogeys (135th – 1.23 ratio).

Wolff is a young upside player who may need a drop-down in class to regain his form. His length will play well at Augusta, but he’ll be in trouble on too many holes to be a factor. Avoid is the crucial work in this decision.

Max Homa ($7,100)

Based on scoring average (70.9) over the past two seasons, Homa still trails the game's top players in scoring and consistency. Even so, he does have 15 top 25s over his previous 36 tournaments. Before missing the cut at The Player Championship, Homa earned his second career win at The Genesis Invitational with three other strong finishes (7th, 10th, and 22nd). He went 2-1 at the Dell Match Play while losing in a playoff before the round of 16 to the eventual winner Billy Horschel.

Homa failed to play on the weekend in his rookie appearance at Augusta in 2020.

He brings a high-ranking drive (303.3 yards – 41st), but Homa missed many fairways (56.6 percent – 155th). His putter grades better than the league average in strokes gained (0.181 – 84th), with better success in his birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.51 – 61st).

There are flashes of brilliance in Homa’s game, but he tends to give away some holes with a short missed putt or an errant drive. I expect him to play better in his second experience at the Masters. Viable dart while needing some breaks to finish inside the top 15.

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Francesco Molinari ($7,000)

Molinari played well in three of his first four starts in 2021 (8th, 10th, and 8th) while going 27 under par over 16 rounds. Over his following two events, he missed the cut both times with scores of 78, 74, 76, and 71.

His best showing at Augusta came in 2019 (5th). Over nine tournaments at the Masters, Molinari has three missed cuts, which includes 2020. He is 24 strokes over par over 30 days of action.

He ranks 144th in driving distance (292.2), with 60.7 percent finding the short grass (96th). Molinari has been off with his putting (-0.002 – 120th in strokes gained). He has 103 birdies and 75 bogeys (1.37 ratio – 87th).

Molinari is a veteran player who can create birdie chances when on top of his game. His resume isn’t high enough to chase in the Millionaire Maker at DraftKings.

Victor Perez ($7,000)

After struggling at the Arnold Palmer Invitational (+8 – 68th) and WGC-Mexico Championship played in Florida (+4 – 52nd), Perez found his rhythm at The Player Championship (9th) and the Dell Match Play (3rd). Over 13 events on the PGA Tour, he only has two top 25 finishes. Perez finished 46th, 72nd, and 4th) in his three tournaments in Europe.

He shot plus one in his first appearance in the Masters in 2020, leading to a 46th place finish.

Perez gains 295.0 yards off the tee (112th) while doing a good job keeping the ball in play (65.1 percent – 48th). His recent success helped his ranking in strokes gained putting (0.465 – 34th). He’s made more bogeys (62) than birdies (59) on the PGA Tour.

His hot run ends at Augusta. I see too much downside and inconsistency to trust as a back-end filler in my pick-6 at DraftKings.

Shane Lowry ($7,000)

There wasn’t a lot of excitement in Lowry’s play in his first three starts (84th, 27th, and 29th) in 2021 in Europe. After a 48th and a MC in the United States, he played well at The Player Championship (8th). The following week, Lowry finished 36th in The Honda Classic.

His career started at the Masters with three missed cuts over four tournaments while being 27 strokes over par in 10 trips around Augusta. Last season, Lowry shot minus four to finish in a tie for 25th.

He sits 71st in driving distance (299.4) while being about league average in his accuracy (59.8 – 103rd). His putter (-0.199 – 152nd in strokes gained) has been a problem. Lowry also doesn’t have an edge in his birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.20 – 143rd).

I don’t see him making a run at a top 15 finish, making him a player to fade at the Masters. His game has more risk than reward at this point of the season.

Corey Conners ($6,900)

Over his last 12 tournaments, Conners played on the weekend 11 times while picking up five top 10s. He finished in 3rd at the Arnold Palmer Invitational and 7th at The Player Championship before getting run over at the Dell Match Play (0-3).

He missed the cut in his first Masters in 2015 (+5). Over the last two years, Conners placed 19th and 10th with two sensational rounds (65 and 69) in 2020.

Conners doesn’t gain an advantage with his driver (294.4 yards – 119th). He does rank well in his ability to keep the ball in play (11th – 69.5 percent). Conners moved to 78th in strokes gained putting (0.210) while having the 22nd best birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.76).

His skill set isn’t ideal for Augusta, but Conners tends to stay out of trouble with improvement in his play at the Masters. Worth a flier if shopping at this salary level

Jason Kokrak ($6,900)

Kokrak started 2021 with seven straight made cuts, with his best results coming in his last three stroke-play events (9th, 8th, and 9th). Over this span, he is 46 under par over 28 rounds. His first PGA win came last fall at The CJ Cup @ Nine Bridges. Kokrak has 38 top 25s over his last 87 tournaments. He did come up short in the Dell Match Play (1-2).

Last season, Kokrak failed to play on the weekend in his first experience at Augusta (+4).

His driver ranks 38th in driving distance (304.1) while hitting the fairway 62.1 percent of the time (81st). Kokrak has been exceptional on the greens (0.772 – 8th in strokes gained), leading to strength in his birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.74 – 25th).

Kokrak offers distance and success with the putter, which bodes well for his expected play at the Masters. When adding-in his recent form, he makes sense as a back-end option in the run at million dollars at DraftKings.

Marc Leishman ($6,900)

After five steady tournaments (24th, 4th, 18th, 32nd, and 39th) to start 2021, Leishman missed the cut over the next two weeks with four sub par rounds (74, 75, 71, and 74). He went 1-1-1 at the Dell Match Play, which wasn’t good enough to play on the weekend.

Leishman struggled in three of his first four trips to the Masters, sandwiched around a fourth-place finish. He’s played 16 rounds over the last four seasons, leading to a 43rd, 9th, 49th, and 13th) while seven strokes under par.

His driver continues to fade in distance (290.0 – 164th) while battling his accuracy (58.6 percent – 128th). Leishman doesn’t gain an edge with his putter (0.013 – 114th in strokes gained). He is about tour average in birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.34 – 96th).

I don’t see any reason to ride Leishman at the Masters. His three negatives add up to a possible missed cut with a minimal chance of finishing inside the top 15.

Brian Harman ($6,800)

Since the middle of last July, Harman made the cut in 17 of his 18 stroke-play events. His game peaked at The Players Championship (3rd) and the Dell Match Play (top eight). Harman won his last tournament (Wells Fargo Championship) in May of 2017. Despite an uptick in play, he only has three top 10s over his previous 37 events.

Harman played at Augusta in 2015 (67th) and 2018 (44th) while going eight over par in his six days of action. He lives in Georgia while being born and raised in the state. His college of choice was the University of Georgia.

He sits 141st in driving distance (292.4 yards) while putting 65.1 percent in the fairway (47th). Harman ranks 24th in strokes gained putting (0.553). He has 229 birdies and 136 bogeys (1.68 ratio – 31st).

The backstory plays well for Harman at Augusta. His game looks to be in top form, but it still doesn’t match the game's top players. He is worth a leap of faith on a ticket or two.

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Matt Kuchar ($6,800)

Kuchar shined in the 2018-2019 season (two wins and over $6.2 million of winnings). Over his next 29 tournaments, he only has two top 10s. His year started with missed three cuts in five events. Kuchar played better at the Dell Match Play (top-eight finish), followed up by 12th in the Valero Open.

On a side note, his win on the 18th hole over Jordan Spieth in the match play event cost me $6,900 via a six-team parlay with all other wins already in the clubhouse.

He’s played in 14 Masters with success in four events (2012 – 3rd, 2013 – 8th, 2014 – 5th, and 2017 – 4th). Kuchar missed the cut in 2020, ending his streak of 10 years of playing on the weekend. Overall, he is one under par over 52 rounds.

Kuchar is short off the tees (286.4 yards – 188th), with 68.9 percent landing on the short grass (13th). His putter has been out of form (-0.024 – 124th in strokes gained), leading to a weak rating in his birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.27 – 122nd).

I can’t write Kuchar off at Augusta based on his career resume and the uptick in recent play. When on his game, he does offer a much better putter. He is more of a dull option, but a snail pace can still finish on a winning ticket if Kuchar minimizes his mistakes.

Ian Poulter ($6,800)

Since the restart of golf last June, Poulter made the cut in 11 of 15 events in the US while delivering only one top 10 finish (5th at the Workday Charity Open). He failed to play on the weekend at The Player Championship (77 and 71) and The Honda Classic (71 and 72) in March before showing improvement in the Dell Match Play (3-0 – top 16 finish).

Poulter has 15 appearances at Augusta with two top 10s (2012 – 7th) and 2015 – 6th). He made the cut 14 times while shooting 12 rounds in the 60s. Overall, Poulter is 17 over par in his 58 trips around the Masters.

He gives up plenty of distance off the tees (286.2 – 191st), with a high level of success putting the ball in the fairway (66.5 percent – 31st). Poulter lost the feel with his putter in his last event, leading to him falling from 39th in strokes gained (0.325) to 61st. He has 83 birdies and 69 bogeys over his 30 rounds.

It is tough to get excited about Poulter at the Masters. He should hang around to play on the weekend with a chance at a top 20 finish. I won’t write him off totally, as his price point is low enough to help with salary cap relief for a top-heavy stud roster.

Gary Woodland ($6,800)

Since The Zozo Championship (WD back issue), Woodland has battled to find his swing and consistency on the course. He missed six of the last nine cuts while posting seven rounds under 70 in his 30 chances. His best play came last week at the Valero Texas Open (6th), thanks to two excellent rounds (67-69) on the weekend.

Woodland has never finished inside the top 24 players in his eight tournaments at the Masters. He’s missed the cut in four of his past five tries, with a high of 32nd in 2019. Augusta tends to give him fits based on his seven rounds of 75 or more. Woodland is 36 over par in 23 days of action.

He jumped to 20th in driving distance (307.7) after airing the ball out in Texas. Unfortunately, his length leads to almost half of his tee shots (46.7 – 188th) landing outside the fairway. Woodland has also battled his putter (-0.368 – 173rd in strokes gained) while also ranking poorly in his birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.09 – 172nd).

Woodland is a bad investment at the Master will almost no shot of being on the winning ticket at DraftKings. He gets into too much trouble off the tees, and his putter won’t save him when he’s out of position on the greens.

Christiaan Bezuidenhout ($6,700)

Bezuidenhout doesn’t bring name value to the Masters, but he is the 35th ranked golfer in the world. Over his previous four events in the United States, Bezuidenhout is 12 under over 16 rounds, with his best showing at the Arnold Palmer Championship (7th). He went 0-2-1 at the Dell Match Play. In Europe in 2021, Bezuidenhout placed 12th, 22nd, and 53rd, while owning three career wins since turning pro in 2015.

In his rookie appearance at the Masters in 2020, he shot minus one to finish 38th.

His driver lacks distance (286.0 – 193rd), with no edge in his accuracy (61.1 percent – 91st). Bezuidenhout does putt well (0.544 – 25th in strokes gained). On the year in the United States, he has more bogeys (63) than birdies (61).

I don’t see the foundation skill set in Bezuidenhout’s game to finish inside the top 15, which I believe is needed to win the overall at DraftKings. His resume on the PGA Tour isn’t ideal, but he has played on many challenging tracks.

Kevin Kisner ($6,700)

Kisner doesn’t have a top 20 finish in his five stroke-play events. He shot 26 under over his first two events in Hawaii, which led to a 24th and 32nd. Kisner missed the cut at The Players Championship (75 and 75) while shining early in the Dell Match Play (2-1).

Last season he failed to play on the weekend at the Masters after posting a 71 and 76. Over his first four appearances, Kisner made the cut, but he could not finish inside the top 20 each time (37th, 43rd, 28th, and 21st). He is 15 over par in his 18 rounds at Augusta.

His driver gained 287.0 yards (188th) off the tee, with 71.9 percent landing the fairway (5th). Kisner picked up an edge on the greens (0.493 – 31st in strokes gained putting). He sits 49th in birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.55 – 49th).

Before his 2020 Masters, Kisner was trending upward in the standing. I don’t see him being in play if the winner is well under par, but he could hang around if the winning score is close to 10 under, which hasn’t been the case over the past three events (-15, -13, and -20). In 2016 when Danny Willett won the Masters, he shot only five-under-par. Kisner is worth a flier or two as he looks to be on a path for the best finish of his career at Augusta.

Dylan Frittelli ($6,700)

Based on his recent play (four missed cuts in six events), Frittelli doesn’t belong in the field at the Masters. Surprisingly, he finished 22nd at The Players Championship, which came after failing to play on the weekend in his previous three tournaments. His only PGA Tour win came in 2019 at the John Deere Classic.

Frittelli struggled at the Masters in 2018 (77 and 74), which led to a missed cut. His play was exceptional in 2020 (5th – 65, 73, 67, and 72), helping someone knock down a big prize at DraftKings.

He brings length off the tees (310.6 – 13th), with only a 50/50 chance of hitting the fairway (207th). When adding his weakness with his putter (-0.540 – 187th in strokes gained), Frittelli doesn’t create enough birdie chances while inviting many disaster holes (1.28 – 109th in birdie-to-bogey ratio).

His recent play says he had no chance of contending, but Frittelli does have a switch where he goes from a bum to a hero in one easy week. I’m staying away as I don’t believe he can repeat his last success at the Masters. The bet here is on his form, which screams donation.

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Si Woo Kim ($6,700)

Over his first two events in 2021, Kim shot 37 under par, leading to a win at The American Express and a 25th place finish at the Sony Open. He proceeded to miss four of his subsequent five cuts. Kim looked better at The Players Championship (9th) and the Valero Texas Open (23rd). He went 0-2-1 at the Dell Match Play.

Kim struggled in his first Masters in 2017 (75 and 81). Over the past three years, he shot minus eight over 12 rounds with two respectable finishes (21st and 24th). Kim has two scores under 70 in his career at Augusta.

His driver gains 297.8 yards (85th), but Kim does struggle to keep the ball in play (57.9 percent – 134th). He is about tour average in strokes gained putting (0.081 – 96th). His big start to the year in birdies (203) helped him to the 30th highest-ranking in birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.68).

There is a dark horse in Kim’s game. He doesn’t shine in any area, but his play at Augusta gives him a chance at pushing inside the top 20. Even so, Kim has a boom or bust feel. The key for him to succeed in keeping the ball in play off the tees.

Sebastian Munoz ($6,600)

From the middle of last August to mid-October, Munoz posted three top 10s while making the cut nine consecutive times. Over the first eight events in 2021, he has two missed cuts and one top 10 (9th). Munoz shot under 70 in the opening round of four of his past five tournaments, but his second scoring came in at 73.4. His only PGA win came at the Sanderson Farms Championship in 2019.

Munoz shot minus six over four rounds over his first trip to Augusta last year, leading to a 19th place finish.

He averages 297.7 yards on his drives (86th), with 61.7 percent finding the short grass (81st). His putter has let him down so far in 2021 (-0.163 – 142nd). Munoz has 239 birdies and 171 bogeys (1.40 ratio – 79th).

His game tends to be streaky while not excelling in any area compared to the game's best players. Munoz is only a coin flip with any investment based on his success at the Masters in 2020.

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Phil Mickelson ($6,600)

After showing a spark at The Honda Classic (25th – 71, 68, 69, and 70), Mickelson blew up in the first round (79) of the Valero Texas Open thanks to a 10 on the par-five 18th. Over his last 13 tournaments on the PGA Tour, he has six missed cuts and five finishes of 35 or higher.

In 28 events at Augusta, Mickelson made the cut 25 times with two wins (2004 and 2006), a second, and five thirds. Overall, he is -72 over 106 rounds at the Masters. Michelson failed to make an impact in his last five trips to Augusta (58th, 22nd, 36th, 18th, and 55th).

His driver still has plenty of distance (301.4 – 57th), but he struggles with accuracy (48.3 - 212th). Mickelson lost the feel for his putter (-0.119 – 138th in strokes gained) while only having three more birdies (124) than bogeys (121).

Even with a great resume at Augusta and his pro career, Mickelson isn’t the same player. His salary reflects his play and value. Easy avoid as his flaws invite too much downside risk.

Danny Willett ($6,600)

Over the last two seasons, Willett averaged 71.8 strokes per round, which is well below the top-tier players. He flashed at the Corales Puntacana Resort & Club Championship (8th) in late March while having no follow-through at the Valero Texas Open (73 and 74). In his three events in Europe this season, Willett finished 16th, 44th, and 63rd.

He won the Masters in 2016, but Willett missed the cut the following three seasons while going 18 over par. In 2020, his swing was much better, leading to a 25th place finish with a score of minus four.

Willett slipped to 129th in driving distance (293.6) while also ranking poorly in his accuracy (55.8 percent – 162nd). He gains no momentum from his putting (-0.288 – 165th in strokes gained) with more bogeys (88) and birdies (85).

This once-in-a-lifetime ticket already came in. Willett isn’t in form while offering disaster behind every crack in his game. I’ll park him on the sidelines this week.

Cameron Champ ($6,600)

Champ showed growth in the 2019-2020 season (10 top 25s in 20 tournaments with one win). After a decent showing (31st) to open this year at the Sentry Tournament of Champions, he’s failed to play on the weekend in six of his next eight tournaments with eight rounds of 75 or more. Last week Champ finished 34th at the Valero Texas Open.

He played well in his first trip to Augusta in 2020 (19th), with a score of minus six.

Champ ranks fourth in driving distance (317.6) and 152th in his success hitting the fairway (56.8 percent). His putter is last on tour in strokes gained (-1.314). He has a 1.25 birdie-to-bogey ratio (123rd).

He is a head shaker for sure, as the pieces to his game continue to underachieve. The bust outweighs the boom by a wide margin at the Masters.

Carlos Ortiz ($6,500)

Last fall, Ortiz picked up his first PGA win at the Houston Open. He made his first eight cuts this season while placing inside the top 10 in two other events (8th and 4th). Over the previous six weeks, Ortiz played in only four tournaments (MC, 15th, and MC), including a 1-2 record at the Dell Match Play. He scored under 70 in 16 of his 24 stroke-play rounds in 2021.

Ortiz will be teeing it up for the first time at the Masters.

His driver comes in at 303.2 yards (43rd), with tour average success finding the fairway (60 percent – 101st). He ranks in the top third in strokes gained putting (0.311 – 63rd) while converting plenty of birdies (217) compared to bogeys (115).

I like what Ortiz brings to the table, but he must avoid the bunkers (195th in sand saves). His game plays better on courses where many birdies are converted. In the mix at this level as the sum of his parts should translate well at Augusta.

Ryan Palmer ($6,500)

Palmer played on the weekend in 14 of his previous 15 events, highlighted by four top 10s (8th, 4th, 4th, and 2nd). Over his last 31 tournaments, he has 18 top 25s and 10 top 10s. Palmer placed 17th at The Players Championship and Valero Texas Open while going 2-0-1 at the Dell Match Play (17).

His last trip to the Masters came in 2015 (33rd). Palmer has two missed cuts over his five appearances paired with one stellar moment (10th in 2011).

He averaged 302.9 yards off the tees (46th) while batting his direction (59.2 percent in the fairways – 115th). Palmer inched up to 65th in strokes gained putting (0.295). His birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.91) is the 10th best on the PGA Tour.

Palmer looks to be underpriced when adding in that he has the 27th ranking globally. He hits the ball far, with upside as well on the greens. Viable backend cheat and his game looks much better than his early days at Augusta.

Kevin Na ($6,500)

In the second week of the 2021 season, Na extended his win streak to four straight years with a Sony Open victory. He has two missed cuts over his previous 10 events. His second-best showing (11th) came in late February at the WGC-Mexico Championship played in Florida. Na shot back-to-back 81s at The Players Championship, followed by a 1-2 record at the Dell Match Play.

In his nine chances at the Masters, he has two missed cuts and three top 15s (12th, 12th, and 13th), with the latter coming in 2020. Over 30 rounds at Augusta, Na is 28 over par.

Na averaged 288.0 yards off the tees (180th) while sitting 26th in fairways hit (66.9 percent). This season, his putting has been much weaker than his career resume (-0.194 – 150th in stroke gained). He ranks 61st in birdie-to-bogey ratio (1.46).

It’s all about creating birdie chances for Na to have success at the Masters. He needs to putt exceptionally well to finish with a playable score at DraftKings. Possible filler for the right team structure.

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Matt Wallace ($6,400)

Wallace played in 21 tournaments in the United States over the past two seasons, leading to two competitive runs (4th in Memorial Tournament and 3rd last week at the Valero Texas Open). Over his three events in Europe, he finished 7th, 51st, and MC. Wallace has four career wins overseas.

In his two trips to Augusta, he is nine over par over 108 holes while finishing in 46th in 2020.

Wallace climbed to 61st in driving distance (300.9), but he has a poor ranking in his accuracy (57.8 – 139th). Despite playing well last week, Wallace slipped to 47th in strokes gained putting (0.389). Over 27 rounds in the US, he has 92 birdies and 82 bogeys.

In his career starts in the PGA Tour, Wallace has never followed up with a higher finish after posting a top 10. In 2019, he played well in PGA Championship (3rd) with success a couple of months later at the US Open (12th). Wallace is trending up, so I would keep an open mind when adding in his low salary.

Lanto Griffin ($6,400)

Other than a clunker at the Dell Match Play (0-3), Griffin has been steady over his previous six stroke-play events (7th, 26th, 22nd, 21st, 35th, and 34th) while going 22 under par. He’s made the cut in 18 of his previous 20 events. Griffin has one PGA win (2019 Houston Open).

He failed to play on the weekend in his first Masters in 2020 (+3).

Griffin has plenty of length off the tees (303.8 yards – 39th). His lack of upside is tied to a low ranking in fairways hit (55.9 percent – 160th) while showing improvement in his putting (0.639 – 16th in strokes gained). He has 224 birdies and 156 bogeys (1.44 ratio – 68th).

With an improving driver and putter, Griffin has the tools to surprise in his second trip to Augusta. I certainly don’t expect a win, but a top 15 finish is not out of the question if he avoids disaster holes. A year of experience at the Masters should help him tremendously in 2021.

Matt Jones ($6,300)

Jones dominated the field in the opening round (61) at The Honda Classic, helping him to a box-to-wire win. He made the cut in 11 of his previous 12 tournaments with two other top 10s (4th and 8th). His scoring average (70.8) in 2021 is almost identical to his two last seasons, which had much lower results.

His only appearance at Augusta came in 2014 when he shot eight over par to miss the cut.

He gains 305.3 yards (30th) on his drives while only finding the short grass 55.6 percent of the time (166th). Jones bumped up to 26th in strokes gained putting (0.540), creating 235 birdies (29th in birdie-to-bogey ratio – 1.72).

Jones took a couple of weeks off after his big win. He’s playing well enough to make the cut, especially when adding in the shorter field. The driver/putter combo has a lot in common with Lanto Griffin. Viable salary cap saver with the tools to surprise in Augusta.


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