NFL Combine: 5 Sleeper WRs who Elevated Their Stock Most

Lance Sanderson

With NFL Draft season fully underway, the nation's top college players began the largest job interview in all of sports in downtown Indianapolis as the 2020 NFL Scouting Combine kicked off the on-field activities on Thursday night.

This might be the deepest and most talented group of wide receivers to ever hit the draft. From deep speed threats to route-running technicians, any team in need of help at the WR position can certainly find it with this list of prospects.

To put this WR class into perspective, there might be six or seven players drafted in the first round at the position. It's that good.

Being as deep and as talented as it is, prospects in this class had a major opportunity to make or break their draft stock. Who stepped up the most? 

Risers

Donovan Peoples-Jones, Michigan: There might not be any player at the WR position that boosted his stock more than DPJ. After blowing the doors out of the building with a 44.5-inch vertical jump, Peoples-Jones ripped off a 4.48-second 40-yard dash. After that, he stayed smooth in the gauntlet and showed his ability to track the ball down the field.

Binjamin Victor, Ohio State: He's long and lanky, but he is smooth. Victor impressed with his hands in the gauntlet drill while maintaining a straight line, as well as his ability to track the ball downfield. However, long and lanky doesn't equal speed, and his 4.63s 40 time was a detriment to his day in Indy.

What happens next for the Broncos in free agency and the draft? Don't miss out on any news and analysis! Take a second and sign up for our free newsletter and get breaking Broncos news delivered to your inbox daily!

Denzel Mims, Baylor: A guy that blew up the Senior Bowl, Mims also blew up the Combine by running 4.4-second 40 and showing smooth hands in the gauntlet. He proved his body control while maintaining his smoothness in and out of his breaks. Mims had a day on Thursday.

Chase Claypool, Notre Dame: For a guy that most people thought should move to tight end because of his size and length, Claypool showed why he belongs amongst the elite at the wide receiver position. At 6-foot-4, Claypool logged a pair of times in the 4.4s area and showed smooth route running ability, and tremendous length to extend and catch the ball.

Darnell Mooney, Tulane: A relatively unknown small-school prospect, Mooney gathered attention by running a 4.38-second 40-yard dash on his first try. He then showed smooth hands, ability to track and catch the ball, and maintain focus with an almost flawless run in the gauntlet. He could be a gadget player to watch as a late-round prospect. 

Follow Lance on Twitter @SandersonMHH and @MileHighHuddle. 

THANKS FOR READING MILE HIGH HUDDLE
Register today or log in to access this premium article.
Comments (21)
No. 1-6
smilinassassin
smilinassassin

Guess we can cancel out Mims as a possible 2nd round target.

Brew77
Brew77

This right here is why the Broncos can look at other needs in this draft besides WR with their first pick. This draft is so deep in WR that you can wait until 2nd 3rd and possibly 4th and get a quality receiver. This is not a necessarily deep draft for defense if the Broncos can get a premier defensive player with their first pick and take a receiver later on that would work for me.

broncobuckeyenomad
broncobuckeyenomad

oh and I'd say Quez Watkins helped his stock quite a bit too...

broncosfan52
broncosfan52

There are 4 or 5 quality offensive linemen, even though I love it when they go for the action players ie running back, wide reciever, etc I do hope they can get a real quality offense lineman or two.

Dick Hanky
Dick Hanky

Chase Claypool is way too fast for such a large human.

CUBuffinTX
CUBuffinTX

I love the combine as much as the next guy but lets not forget what this thing was started for. Medicals, and face to face interviews, almost every team has everyone of these players graded and what they do here moves the needle very little. If they wanted to know who is fast on a football field they would suit them up and have them run. Guys in track clothes don't run the same as guys with pads and helmets on. Example 1) Al Toon and Eddie Brown were both drafted ahead of Jerry Rice because Jerry was "Slow" how many times did jerry Rice get caught from behind ? Example 2) Have you ever watched Eric Dickerson run in full pads ? When John Robinson was coach of the Rams I saw him comment on how Dickerson was the fastest player he had ever seen with pads on. That he could run by you full speed and you did not "hear" his pads or helmet at all, like he was running in shorts and a T-shirt. When you have guys running a 4.4 and he shakes his pads around and bobs his head and his helmet moves how fast is he ? for sure there are exceptions like Hill and possibly even Ruggs and that is still a maybe. What they do on the tape in a game is what matters. Oh and one last thing, for the Teams that do mistakenly fall in love with a football player at a track meet, they get the pleasure of explaining the Mike Mamula's of the world. Don't know who he is ? look him up it will explain it all.


Draft

FEATURED
COMMUNITY