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McClure's 2022 Ravens Mock Seven-Round Mock Draft

Ravens look to get healthier, younger in 2022.

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — For Ravens fans, the NFL Draft always brings a feeling of optimism around improving the team’s talent. 

While much has already been said regarding the recent history of injury problems, the 2022 draft represents another step towards purging the roster of those types of players. 

In today’s 17-game NFL season, having a roster of good durable players is just as important to success as having elite talent at key positions. 

What began with the departure of oft-injured players such as Tavon Young, DeShon Elliot, and Sammy Watkins, there are still several players on the roster that have dealt with significant injuries — Nick Boyle, Justice Hill, Iman Marshall, and (dare I say it) Ronnie Stanley. The Ravens need to acquire a combination of starters, situational guys, and depth players over the three days of the draft.

Before I get started with the business at hand, I wanted to extend a heartfelt shout-out to one of the best sports executives we have ever seen in Baltimore, Dick Cass. On behalf of us season-ticket holders, thank you for all that you did to make game-day at the stadium such an excellent experience. 

While you avoided the spotlight, the culture you pushed down throughout the organization brought us fans together as a community. From the friendly demeanor of parking lot attendants to the high-fives dolled out by the greeters on the escalators, Cass' spirit resonated everywhere on game day. Enjoy retirement …. we will miss you.

When it comes to draft needs, this year feels like Groundhog Day with one exception. Pass rush, offensive line and wide receiver all have a familiar ring, but this year, the Ravens also need a solid cornerback. Free-agent defections and injury recovery concerns have a once deep secondary too thin for comfort. 

Ideally, the team would have 11-12 new players by Sunday by trading back in a few spots but at least keeping the 10 picks is paramount to filling the necessary holes. While the Ravens are sure to move around on draft day, this mock focuses on the picks they currently hold.

George Karlaftis

George Karlaftis

Round 1 (Pick 14) – George Karlaftis – Edge, Purdue

Analysis: Complete edge defender with the size to set the edge, the strength to play stout against the run, and the power to collapse the pocket. Having only played football since high school, he has tremendous upside with his technique. Playing elite defense requires players that complement one another. Karlaftis is to  Odafe Oweh as Jamie Sharper was to Peter Boulware. I’m betting one or two teams make the desperate decision of taking a quarterback in the top 13. If so, Karlaftis should fall to the Ravens. If he is gone, trade down a few spots and take Trevor Penning.

Kyler Gordon

Kyler Gordon

Round 2 (Pick 45) – Kyler Gordon, CB, Washington

Analysis: Great blend of size (6 feet, 194 lbs) and speed (4.52 in the 40). Allowed a 47.3 passer rating during 2021, while earning first-team Pac-12 honors. Can play both inside in the slot or outside. Decent in run support as he likes to hit. A confident/cocky demeanor will keep his memory short. Mental aspects need development but that’s coachable. There is a good chance he isn’t available at pick 45. If not, cornerback Rodger McCreary from Auburn is an excellent option. The Ravens must secure a corner from the second tier as the drop-off is huge after they are gone.

Max Mitchell

Max Mitchell

Round 3 (Pick 76) – Max Mitchell, OT, Louisiana Lafayette

Analysis: College football’s highest-rated tackle in 2021 albeit against mostly non-Power 5 opponents. Showed he can play with the best at the Senior bowl. Anchors well against the bull rush. Has the strength to push the pile on running plays. Occasionally gets beat to the inside by speed rushers but uses long arms to recover. Rarely gives up pressure from the outside. Capable of playing on the right or left side.

 Luke Fortner

 Luke Fortner

Round 3 (Pick 100) – Luke Fortner, C, Kentucky

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Analysis: Playing experience at all three interior O-line positions during his college career. Quietly and consistently performed well at center for Kentucky and during Senior Bowl week. Technically sound. Rarely has a bad snap. Uses bulk and lower body strength to limit push into the backfield. Plays a little tall which could make him susceptible against shorter quick defensive linemen.

Alec Pierce

Alec Pierce

Round 4 (Pick 110) – Alec Pierce, WR, Cincinnati

Analysis: A big, 6-2 foot receiver with proven college production. Can be effective against press or zone coverage. Has the ability to use his size and physical technique to make the catch. Lack of quickness and shake could be limiting in some routes. Strength will be an asset in run blocking. Doesn’t have the gaudy stats or name recognition of top receivers in this draft but he could be the do-it-all receiver the Ravens have been seeking. Can you say “Move those chains … Move those chains!

Matthew Butler

Matthew Butler

Round 4 (Pick 119) – Matthew Butler, DL, Tennessee

Analysis: Powerful with a strong punch to take on blocks at the point of attack. Uses his arms well to maintain gap integrity against the run. Plays with a violent demeanor you want in the trenches. Works hard to get better every practice. Will push for playing time as a rotational player in year 1. Has the smarts and range to remain around the ball. Looks the part of a complete pro. Could be a long-term building block on a D-line that needs to get younger.

Charlie Kolar

Charlie Kolar

Round 4 (Pick 128) – Charlie Kolar, TE, Iowa State

Analysis: Considered one of the top returning tight ends going into the 2021 college season, Kolar’s star faded with the emergence of some flashy pass-catching tight ends. He still finished fifth in receiving yardage for the season. Has the frame and weight (260lbs) to be a strong blocker. Releases well and can find the coverage holes against a zone in the passing game. Route running needs development and polish. There is no doubt that the Ravens' run game production suffered in part to Boyle’s absence. The scheme requires a tight end that can block from a variety of formations. For all his positives, Boyle simply cannot stay available on game day.

Neil Farrell Jr.

Neil Farrell Jr.

Round 4 (Pick 139) – Neil Farrell Jr., DT/DE, LSU

Analysis: Broke out in 2021 as a dominant run defender. Plays low with good leverage for his size. Uses his arms exceptionally well to keep blockers off his body and stay in the gap. Excellent upper body strength to go with above-average leg power. Doesn’t get driven off the ball frequently. Adds little in terms of pass pressure. Will keep blockers off the linebackers. Projects as a rotational guy in run situations.

Tariq Castro-Fields,

Tariq Castro-Fields,

Round 4 (Pick 141) - Tariq Castro-Fields, CB, Penn State

Analysis: Castro-Fields has five years of experience in college. Understands defensive schemes and rarely gets caught out of position. Has the speed to run with most receivers with above-average quickness. Slower stopping and restarting so can be susceptible to double moves. Willing tackler that is not afraid to attack a ballcarrier. Physical style is an asset in press coverage. With Anthony Averett gone, adding reliable CB depth to the roster is critical.

Hassan Haskins

Hassan Haskins

Round 6 (Pick 196) – Hassan Haskins, RB, Michigan

Analysis: Punishing workhorse back that runs hard on every play. Carried the Michigan offense at times. Runs with enough patience to let blocks develop. Solid in pass protection both mentally and physically. Good hands make him a serviceable option out of the backfield. Lacks top-tier burst and explosive speed but versatility makes him a useful number 3 back. An upgrade over Justice Hill who has struggled to catch on even during the rare occasion that he is healthy.  

— Scott McClure has provided an annual draft preview for Raven Country since 2020.