Tuesday April 21st, 2015

Washington Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III told NFL.com that New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady politely declined to offer advice until after after his career was done, citing "a competitive landscape."

Griffin, entering his fourth NFL season, said last August that he would like to pick Brady's brain. At the time, the Redskins and Patriots were holding joint practices in Richmond, Va. New England later won Super Bowl XLIX, Brady's fourth title. Washington finished 4–12, last in the NFC East, and Griffin was limited to nine games by a dislocated left ankle.

Griffin told NFL.com he did indirectly receive some guidance from Brady during training camp, as the opportunity to watch the Patriots practice was a benefit in itself.

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"What you do learn from watching (Brady) -- and then watching the Patriots organization -- you get a big-picture look at it," Griffin said. "Man, honestly, they operate like a high school football team. You remember in high school, how the coach calls everybody up, everybody runs up, gets on a knee and looks at the coach like what he is saying is the most important thing in the world? That's how the Patriots are.

"They're attentive. They run on and off the field. They run after practice. They do what they have to do -- and everyone understands, whether they like it or not, this is what it takes to win championships. And they won the championship.

"For us to see that, as the Washington Redskins -- to see exactly where it starts, and then to see the result -- that's big. We can't ignore that. We don't need to mimic them or try to be like them. We need to create our own culture -- but we can learn from some of those things."

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The Redskins have two weeks to decide if they will pick up Griffin's fifth-year option or allow him the opportunity to reach free agency after this season. If Washington does pick up the option, Griffin's 2016 salary would be guaranteed between $14 million and $16 million.

Mike Fiammetta

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