Tuesday September 13th, 2016

Denver Broncos linebacker Brandon Marshall met with Denver police chief Robert White on Tuesday.

Marshall had asked his followers on Twitter to send him questions they would like him to ask White in the meeting, which was called to discuss Marshall's kneeling during the national anthem to protest police brutality and racial inequality. 

Marshall kneeled when the national anthem was played in the team's season opening game against the Carolina Panthers last Thursday, showing support to San Francisco quarterback Colin Kaepernick. Kaepernick has chosen not stand for the national anthem before games as a protest to police violence and racial inequality in the United States.

“We talked about ‘OK, obviously you taking this stance—exercising your First Amendment rights, acknowledging that there’s an issue that is important to you, which he believes it is—is great,'" White said, according to the Denver Post. "'So now what are you going to do? Now that you’ve acknowledged the issue, what are you going to do?’ Part of that for him is having this conversation."

White also gave Marshall three reports on policing and police reform, including the President's Task Force on 21st Century Policing Report. 

"It became pretty clear to me that his kneeling was to speak to the injustices that he feels are going across in our country," White said, according to the Denver Post. "But I also think he recognizes—and we talked about this—that most of the men and women in law enforcement, and certainly those in Denver, are out doing the right thing every single day. And it’s that small percentage that is a challenge for our community (that) is a challenge for me.”

Kaepernick has said he will continue his protest, which nearly a dozen other NFL players have joined. 

Marshall has lost two endorsement deals because of his protest. Air Academy Federal Credit Union said it was ending its relationship with Marshall last week and on Monday, CenturyLink terminated its contract with Marshall.

"It's an evil world," Marshall tweeted on Tuesday. "It's a hateful world. I'm not here to spread hate. I'm not here to respond to the hate. I'm here to spread love and positivity. I'm a likeable guy. I was once a fan favorite for a reason. It's cool, because people can call me the N-word or cuss...at me or say they wish I'd break my neck all they want. There's no backlash from me. Hate can't drive out hate. Only love can drive out hate."

- Scooby Axson

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