Report: Astros Executive Brandon Taubman's Job Status Being Evaluated

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Astros assistant general manager Brandon Taubman's job status is being evaluated following his comments made on closer Roberto Osuna to a group of reporters on Saturday, according to ESPN's Buster Olney.

Sports Illustrated's Stephanie Apstein reported on Monday that Taubman turned to three female reporters in the Astros' clubhouse after the team clinched the American League pennant on Saturday and yelled multiple times, "Thank God we got Osuna! I’m so f------ glad we got Osuna!" One of the reporters was wearing a purple domestic-violence awareness bracelet. 

In May 2018, Osuna was arrested on domestic violence charges while playing for the Blue Jays. The charges were dropped but Major League Baseball suspended Osuna for 75 games for violating its domestic violence policy. Houston traded for him last year shortly before his suspension ended.

After SI published Apstein's report on Monday, the Astros released a statement calling it an "attempt to fabricate a story where one does not exist."

Sports Illustrated said on Tuesday that it "unequivocally stands behind Apstein, her reporting and the story."

Multiple other outlets—including the Houston Chronicle and Yahoo! Sports—have corroborated SI's reporting.

On Tuesday, Taubman issued a statement apologizing for his comments on Osuna.

"In retrospect, I realized that my comments were unprofessional and inappropriate," Taubman said in the statement. "My overexuberance in support of a player has been misinterpreted as a demonstration of a regressive attitude about an important social issue."

MLB announced on Tuesday it would launch an investigation into the comments made by Taubman and interview those involved.

According to Olney, an MLB official questioned earlier this week what the Astros would do if Taubman's description of Saturday's incident does not match what investigators find.

Speaking to reporters ahead of Game 2 of the World Series on Wednesday, MLB commissioner Rob Manfred said he was waiting on the investigators' report and was "really concerned" about the type of environment the league was creating in team clubhouses.

Manfred added, "there will be a conversation with the club at the end of the investigation, and as is often the case, we'll make a decision with the club as to who should handle it."