Angels Announcer Torches MLB for Ending Rookie’s Potentially Historic Streak With Brutal Ruling

Apr 1, 2024; Miami, Florida, USA; Los Angeles Angels first baseman Nolan Schanuel (18) celebrates.
Apr 1, 2024; Miami, Florida, USA; Los Angeles Angels first baseman Nolan Schanuel (18) celebrates. / Rich Storry-USA TODAY Sports

Los Angeles Angels first baseman Nolan Schanuel walked in an otherwise pedestrian 0-for-4 performance in his team's 8-6 loss to the Boston Red Sox on Friday. The walk marked the 36th straight game in which Schanuel had reached base to start his career—the third-longest streak in MLB history.

The above paragraph was correct at the time it transpired. It is now incorrect.

Early Saturday morning on the East Coast, MLB ruled that a March 30 single by Schanuel in a 13-4 loss to the Baltimore Orioles was now an error on Orioles pitcher Mike Baumann. Boom! No more streak.

That did not sit well with Angels play-by-play announcer Wayne Randazzo, who lit into MLB on the air Saturday during Los Angeles's 2-1 win over the Red Sox.

"You have scandal after scandal. You have a fiasco in Oakland. You have these ridiculous-looking jerseys. You have the MLBPA challenging the league about the pitch clock today, because of constant pitcher injuries," Randazzo said. "You have a young player who's trying to make a name for himself, who's come up and reached base safely in every single game that he has played... And the league allows this scoring change to go on... it is an absurdity."

Randazzo suggested the play was "a clear hit," which you can adjudicate for yourself here.

Whether one agrees with Randazzo or not, it seems hard to argue with the idea that MLB could stand to reevaluate its priorities a bit.


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Patrick Andres

PATRICK ANDRES

Patrick Andres has been a Staff Writer on the Breaking & Trending News Team at Sports Illustrated since 2022. Before SI, his work appeared in The Blade, Athlon Sports, Fear the Sword, and Diamond Digest. Patrick has covered everything from zero-attendance Big Ten basketball to a seven-overtime college football game. He is a graduate of Northwestern University.