Philadelphia Phillies Take Switch Pitcher In New Mock Draft

The Philadelphia Phillies select a different kind of two-way player in MLB Pipeline mock draft.
May 23, 2024; Hoover, AL, USA; Mississippi State Bulldogs pitcher Jurrangelo Cijntje (50) pitches against the Vanderbilt Commodores during the SEC Baseball Tournament at Hoover Metropolitan Stadium. Vasha Hunt-USA TODAY Sports
May 23, 2024; Hoover, AL, USA; Mississippi State Bulldogs pitcher Jurrangelo Cijntje (50) pitches against the Vanderbilt Commodores during the SEC Baseball Tournament at Hoover Metropolitan Stadium. Vasha Hunt-USA TODAY Sports / Vasha Hunt-USA TODAY Sports
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The Philadelphia Phillies are projected to take a very interesting player in a new mock draft. In MLB Pipeline's newest projections, Jonathan Mayo has the Phillies slated to take Jurrangelo Cijntje, an ambidexterous pitcher from Mississippi State. There hasn't been a pitcher of his skillset in MLB since Pat Venditte.

Cijntje made headlines prior to his freshman year in 2023 because of the rarity of what he does. Despite him being one of the most famous college players in the country before he even threw a pitch, the switch pitcher struggled during his freshman year.

In 14 games, he pitched to an 8.10 ERA and despite his ability to miss a lot of bats, sporting an 11.3 K/9, he struggled with control. In the 50 innings he threw that season, he walked 34 batters, ending up with a 6.1 BB/9.

He saw vast improvements in his 2024 season, lowering his ERA to 3.67 in 90.2 innings, still striking out over 11 batters per nine and also cutting his walk rate in half. His performance this year greatly boosted his draft stock, vaulting him into first round consideration, and he's still just 21-years-old.

When talking about Cijntje, the fact that he pitches both right and left handed is always going to be the first thing that comes up. However, much like a switch hitter, he is better from one side of the mound than the other. Although he is a natural lefty, Cijntje is a better prospect from the right side.

From the right side, he has a 60-grade fastball that touches 98 with a plus slider. From the left, his fastball sits in the low 90s and the slider loses about ten mph in velocity.

Most think that as a southpaw, he would end up a reliever despite there not being much velocity. According the his scouting report, he would be a "Marcus Stroman-esuqe" pitcher from the right side. Clearly, his future in pro ball is as a right handed pitcher, especially if he can be a starter touching 98.

The control still leaves a little to be desired, but if he becomes a fulltime righty after being drafted, he can focus more on his control from one side of the mound.

Cijntje is maybe the most fascinating player in the draft this year, simply because a switch pitcher is so rare. A team may let him try to pitch from both sides in pro ball, but it's a pretty slim chance that he continues to do it even a year from now. From the right side, he is a pretty exciting prospect and could get even better when doing it full time.


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Sean O'Leary

SEAN O'LEARY