The Lakers guard's timing always seems to be a little off.

By Alaa Abdeldaiem
December 13, 2018

Josh Hart's second season in the NBA is off to a good start. The Lakers guard has improved since his debut year, averaging 9.1 points, 3.3 rebounds and 1.2 assists so far in 2018.

The one thing he hasn't improved on? High-fives.

Hart's struggles to make contact on high-fives haven't gone unnoticed. In fact, Hart himself has acknowledged his shortcomings, giving himself a high-five after LeBron James left him hanging. James apologized on Twitter and took blame for Hart's failure to connect, but Silver Screen & Roll refused to accept that reasoning behind the second-year guard's terrible streak.

In a serious, whole-hearted attempt to understand Hart's inability to connect on high-fives, Silver Screen & Roll decided to break down the tape.

A film-room analysis of Hart's failures revealed that the Lakers guard has just a 28 percent high-five success rate. The analysis also reveals that the root of the problem is Hart's timing, as he tends to initiate a high-five when his teammates are looking away.

Hart may have a plate full of things he wants to focus on this season, like getting more playing time and ending the Lakers' playoff drought. But if the second-year guard wants to reach his true potential, he'll have to put more effort into the little things, too.

This is one of them.

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HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)