FILE - In this Sunday, Dec. 21, 2014 file photo, Dallas Cowboys running back Joseph Randle (21) carries the ball during the second half of an NFL football game against the Indianapolis Colts in Arlington, Texas. Kansas prosecutors say there is not suffic
Tim Sharp, File
April 29, 2015

WICHITA, Kan. (AP) Kansas prosecutors declined Wednesday to bring felony charges against Dallas Cowboys running back Joseph Randle following a domestic disturbance at a hotel in Wichita, saying they concluded after reviewing the extensive police investigation that there is a lack of evidence to support them.

''The sufficiency of proof required in a criminal case is proof beyond a reasonable doubt,'' District Attorney Marc Bennett said in a news release. ''We find the nature of the available evidence in this instance is insufficient to meet that burden as to felony charges.''

The case may still be referred by police to the city prosecutor's office for potential misdemeanor charges. Randle's attorney, Gary Ayers, did not immediately return phone and email messages seeking comment on the development.

Ayers has long contended the allegations against his client ''have no merit.'' The Dallas running back has denied he threatened his former girlfriend or pulled a gun during an incident that led to his arrest on a marijuana possession charge that was later dropped.

Spokesmen for the Cowboys and the NFL declined comment.

Randle could face punishment from the league under terms of a personal conduct policy that was revised in December after the league was widely criticized for its handling of Ray Rice's domestic violence case. Randle also faces misdemeanor theft charges in the Dallas area.

The Kansas case stems from a Feb. 3 incident at a Wichita hotel where Randle's former girlfriend, Dalia Jacobs, had gone that day so he could see their baby.

Jacobs told police Randle brandished a gun and broke a car window during the altercation. She filed for a protective order the next day, claiming Randle pointed a gun at a vehicle with their son and Jacobs' friend inside.

Jacobs told a 911 dispatcher that Randle threatened her with a gun near their son and made another woman bleed. In the first 911 call, Jacobs urged the dispatcher to send someone quickly but not tell Randle who had called. A different woman made the second call. In the third, Jacobs said everything was fine.

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AP Sports Writer Schuyler Dixon in Dallas contributed to this report.

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